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Re: [Synoptic-L] CD of color-coded synopsis

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  • David B. Peabody
    Brian, I have interleaved some responses below. ... Thank you. Tom and I look forward to critical responses to this work, particularly from persons like
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 7, 2001
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      Brian,

      I have interleaved some responses below.

      Quoting "Brian E. Wilson" <brian@...>:

      > David B. Peabody wrote --
      > >
      > >Since we are publishing a new and improved version of this synopsis
      > >with Trinity Press International this fall, we are not allowed to
      > >display the newer version on the WEB. However, this new Markan Synopsis
      > >on CD-ROM is advertised in the fall 2001 Trinity catalog to sell for $
      > >30.00. We, therefore, do not expect that this price will prohibit
      > >anyone from purchasing and utilizing this new software.
      > >
      >
      > Congratulations in advance to yourself and Tom Longstaff.

      Thank you. Tom and I look forward to critical responses to this work,
      particularly from persons like yourself who have done some serious thinking about
      the Synoptic Problem and the making of synopses. Certainly we would hope that the
      membership of Synoptic-L would have some interest in what Tom and I have
      composed.

      > What name is the work given in the catalog of Trinity Press
      > International, please?

      The title of this synopsis, as indicated on page 6 of the fall 2001 Trinity Press
      International catalog, is "A Synopsis of Mark. A Synopsis of the First Three
      Gospels Showing the Parallels to the Markan Text.

      > Would you be prepared to say in what sense you see the work as a "Markan
      > Synopsis"?

      This synopsis is Markan in the sense that we have utilized the running text of
      the whole of Mark as the "lead gospel," if you will. Hopefully, next to this
      running text of Mark, we have displayed all of the contextual parallels to Mark
      and quite a few, if not all, of the non-contextual, verbal parallels, as well.
      For instance, in one pericope, we utilized nine columns to display all of what we
      would consider to be the relevant evidence.

      This synopsis may, therefore, primarily be described as "Markan" because we have
      not yet included in it the complete texts of Matthew and Luke, only those
      passages in Mt and Lk that relate, sometimes even rather "loosely," to a parallel
      in Mark. As soon as we can complete the work, we will offer an "upgrade" to this
      synopsis in which the entirety of the texts of Matthew and Luke will be included.

      Nevertheless, even in its current form, we have already included a considerable
      amount of material common to Matthew and Luke that is not also found in Mark.
      Such material appears, or instance, in passages that some advocates of the Two
      Document Hypothesis would label "Mark-Q overlaps".

      This synopsis was also constructed for the primary purpose of illustrating the
      argumentation made in *One Gospel From Two. Mark's Use of Matthew and Luke.* This
      form of the synopsis is, therefore, also "Markan" because that book focuses on
      the composition of Mark.

      This forthcoming volume is also advertised on page 6 in the fall 2001 TPI
      catalog. In the book we say that our "ideal reader" will have our electronic
      color-coded synopsis open as he or she reads this book. Such, at least, are the
      hopes of this forthcoming volume's co-authors, Lamar Cope, editor, David L.
      Dungan, William R. Farmer+, Thomas R. W. Longstaff, Allan J. McNicol, editor,
      David B. Peabody, lead editor, and Philip L. Shuler.

      Unfortunately, this book will not now be published as soon as the synopsis, which
      should be available for purchase for the first time at the Annual Meeting of the
      SBL in Denver, November 2001 and from TPI, of course, anytime thereafter. The
      book will appear as soon as possible after that, now probably sometime in the
      spring or summer of 2002.

      > Am I right that in your country a printed synopsis with no colors would
      > cost more than $30?

      Yes. For instance, Aland's Greek synopsis is currently listed for sale at $ 69.99
      in the on-line catalog for the American Bible Society.

      Synopsis Quattuor Evangeliorum. Greek Synopsis of the 4 Gospels - K. Aland,
      editor. The Nestle-Aland 26th edition text, with full critical apparatus and
      parallels from the apocryphal Gospels and Patristic sources. Key to sigla. GBS,
      Stuttgart, 1990 14th revised edition, 4th printing. Cloth, 27 x 22 cm., xxxii,
      590 p.

      Since the same volume is distributed world-wide, it has the same large pages you
      note as characterizing printed, black and white, synopses available in the UK
      (cf. Bernard Orchard's synopsis). Of course, Aland's synopsis also includes the
      Gospel of John, a rich collection of annotations relating to textual variants, a
      complete text of the Gospel of Thomas, excerpts in Greek from Patristic texts
      relating to the gospels, etc. It is certainly worth its price.

      However, I understand that all texts of the Bible distributed by the American
      Bible Society, including Aland's synopsis, are subsidized. That is, the buyer
      does not pay the total cost of the publication of text of the Bible or "portions"
      of it. Handbooks on the Bible or parts of it or commentaries on the Bible,
      however, even if extensive amounts of Biblical text are quoted, are not
      subsidized.

      > Printed synopses tend to be on the more expensive
      > side in the UK because of their large pages. The price of the CD is
      > surely very reasonable.

      As you have quoted me above, Tom and I would agree and hope that cost will not
      prohibit anyone from using this new synopsis.

      > I find that I use different synopses for different purposes. Each seems
      > to have its own particular advantages. I would want to add your synopsis
      > to my collection. I anticipate that your new creation will have its own
      > special uses and be widely used and quoted.
      >
      > Best wishes,
      > BRIAN WILSON

      I also use a variety of synopses for various purposes and, of course, hope that
      you and others will find a place for this new synopsis in whatever collection of
      tools or aids for the study of the gospels you may have.

      Best,

      David Barrett Peabody





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    • Brian E. Wilson
      Brian Wilson wrote -- ... Stephen Carlson replied -- ... Stephen, I agree with what you say here, including the comment that non- parallelism similarity is a
      Message 2 of 19 , Aug 8, 2001
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        Brian Wilson wrote --
        >
        >In my view the synoptic problem is to put forward a hypothesis that
        >accounts well for the non-parallelism similarities, as well as for
        >the parallelism similarities, between the synoptic gospels.
        >
        Stephen Carlson replied --
        >
        >Phrased in this manner (though the term "non-parallelism similarity"
        >is a bit too infelicitous), the issue may have more relevance to
        >the synoptic problem, but it is important to remember that the
        >synoptic problem exists in the first place because of the so-called
        >"parallelism similarities," without which the so-called "non-
        >parallelism similarities" may be insufficient to establish that some
        >literary relationship exists between and/or among the synoptics.
        >

        Stephen,
        I agree with what you say here, including the comment that "non-
        parallelism similarity" is a bit too infelicitous. I will try and do
        something about that.

        Best wishes,
        BRIAN WILSON

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