Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

[Fwd: [Synoptic-L] Kloppenborg on the MAs (was Re: Incontrovertible evidence?)]

Expand Messages
  • Tim Reynolds
    ... Sorry; don t know. Have you thought of asking on-list? (It may be that you have already done so, but I am just checking a whole batch of mail). Best
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 15, 2001
    • Brian E. Wilson
      ... Tim, I assume you mean the work of C. H. Roberts. His work was continued by collaboration with T. C. Skeat to produce, The Birth of the Codex (London,
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 16, 2001
        >Tim Reynolds wrote:
        >
        >Do you happen to know if anyone is still carrying on Roberts'
        >investigations of codex format origins?
        >
        Tim,
        I assume you mean the work of C. H. Roberts. His work was continued
        by collaboration with T. C. Skeat to produce, "The Birth of the Codex"
        (London, 1983) in which a new hypothesis was put forward - not that the
        codex format book was a development from the parchment notebook (the old
        hypothesis), but that tablets were used to record the Oral Law as
        pronounced by Jesus, and that these tablets might have been developed
        into a primitive form of codex which eventually was expanded to form a
        Proto-Gospel. From this the first Gospel was produced. If this first
        work to be written on a papyrus codex was a Gospel, it is easy to
        understand that the codex rapidly became the sole format for the
        Christian scriptures, given the authority a Gospel would carry. (The
        above summarizes chapter 10, 'The Christian Adoption of the Codex' :
        "Two Hypotheses").

        T. C. Skeat is still alive and producing hand-written letters in clear
        script (rather like a 2nd century Greek papyrus with usually each letter
        written separately but with some consecutive letters joined together) on
        tablets of 21st century note-paper. Since the death of C. H. Roberts, he
        has produced another hypothesis that was published in "Zeitschrift fur
        Papyrologie und Epigraphik' 102, 1994, 263-268 entitled "The Origin of
        the Christian Codex".

        From a different direction, research into the origin of the codex format
        book is being pursued also by John L. Sharpe of Duke University. He is
        especially interested in the wooden codex book as a possible origin of
        the papyrus and parchment codex format book. His writing on the Kellis
        Isocrates wooden codex book provides a new angle on the whole subject of
        the origin of the codex format book. (See the introductory chapter by
        Sharpe in "The Kellis Isocrates Codex", edited K. A. Worp and A.
        Rijksbaronl, Oxbow Monograph 88, 1997.) On page 10, Sharpe writes --
        >
        >"In its form it (the Kellis Isocrates wooden codex book) partakes of
        >the scribal tradition of the papyrus book of the period and also of the
        >great codices - Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, and Alexandrinus - and as such
        >it raises questions as to which one influenced the other. Was the
        >papyrus book - and consequently the large format parchment codices -
        >the model for the wooden tablet, or was it the other way around?
        >The wooden book had been around for quite some time, its format and
        >been developed to meet the demands of the user, and there remains the
        >likelihood that the model of the wooden book in a form such as is found
        >in the Isocrates codex shared in the shaping of the format of the book
        >of the first several centuries of the first millenium A.D."
        >

        Moreover, research is being carried out into the use of wooden writing
        materials by the Romans in the first and second centuries AD. Perhaps
        the key writer on this is Alan K. Bowman. See his "Life and Letters on
        the Roman Frontier" which is mostly about the first/second century AD
        wooden writing-tablets found at Vindolanda on Hadrian's Wall in the UK.
        The photographs are excellent. See particularly Plate III (page 159)
        which displays a quotation from Virgil's "Aeneid".

        Mention should also be made of the work of Menahem Haran of the Hebrew
        University of Jerusalem. He wrote on -- 'Codex, Pinax and Writing Slat'
        -- to be found in "Scripta Classica Isralica", XV, 1996, 212-222. He
        considers writing on wood as well as writing on other materials.

        I imagine there are other scholars who are also engaged in continuing
        the work of Roberts on the origin of the codex format book. One wonders
        what Roberts would have made of the Sharpe's ideas on the wooden codex
        book, and Haran's thoughts on the wooden writing slat.

        I received an e-mail yesterday from a Dutch friend who gave a marvellous
        paper at the SBL International Meeting in Rome last week, suggesting
        that I might be interested to look up, David Trobisch, "The First
        Edition of the New Testament" (Oxford, 2000) since this deals with the
        codex format book and the Nomina Sacra. Maybe further lines of research
        will be indicated in this. I would propose to write to the List about
        this if I obtain a copy soon, although perhaps someone else already has
        a copy and would like to report?

        Best wishes,
        BRIAN WILSON

        >HOMEPAGE *** RECENTLY UPDATED *** http://www.twonh.demon.co.uk/

        Rev B.E.Wilson,10 York Close,Godmanchester,Huntingdon,Cambs,PE29 2EB,UK
        > "What can be said at all can be said clearly; and whereof one cannot
        > speak thereof one must be silent." Ludwig Wittgenstein, "Tractatus".
        _

        Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
        List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
      • David C. Hindley
        ... marvellous paper at the SBL International Meeting in Rome last week, suggesting that I might be interested to look up, David Trobisch, The First Edition
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 16, 2001
          Brian Wilson asks:

          >>I received an e-mail yesterday from a Dutch friend who gave a
          marvellous paper at the SBL International Meeting in Rome last week,
          suggesting that I might be interested to look up, David Trobisch, "The
          First Edition of the New Testament" (Oxford, 2000) since this deals
          with the codex format book and the Nomina Sacra. Maybe further lines
          of research will be indicated in this. I would propose to write to the
          List about this if I obtain a copy soon, although perhaps someone else
          already has a copy and would like to report?<<

          Trobisch is interested in evidence that points to editorial activity
          on the part of publishers. He is of the opinion that the NT,
          substantially as we have it now, was actually published as a unit in
          the 2nd century CE, rather than collected over time. That is not the
          same as meaning that all the individual "books" were contained in
          single codices, or were written for publication as a group. They
          probably were collected from existing collections circulated in the
          familiar groupings of Gospels, Pauline Epistles, Acts+Catholic
          epistles, Revelation.

          Still, he points out catchword associations, many of which appear to
          be interpolated into existing texts, that suggest that the texts that
          have come down were that of a common edition. He also proposes that
          both nomina sacra *and* the codex form were adopted by Christian
          publishers as a way to distinguish their pious literature from that of
          Jews and others. It started with their editions of the Lxx and
          continued with their own devotional literature.

          I have abstained from too much detail due to time constraints, but the
          book is less than 185 pages and is easy to read. It will not deal too
          much with the origin of the codex itself, but rather assumes that it
          was a legitimate alternative book format available in the 1st century
          and later.

          Respectfully,

          Dave Hindley
          Cleveland, Ohio, USA



          Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
          List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
        • Brian E. Wilson
          Brian Wilson wrote -- ... I found a copy of this book on the new books shelf in the UL at Cambridge this afternoon. It seems to me that it is not concerned
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 16, 2001
            Brian Wilson wrote --
            >
            >I received an e-mail yesterday from a Dutch friend who gave a
            >marvellous paper at the SBL International Meeting in Rome last week,
            >suggesting that I might be interested to look up, David Trobisch, "The
            >First Edition of the New Testament" (Oxford, 2000) since this deals
            >with the codex format book and the Nomina Sacra. Maybe further lines of
            >research will be indicated in this. I would propose to write to the
            >List about this if I obtain a copy soon, although perhaps someone else
            >already has a copy and would like to report?
            >

            I found a copy of this book on the new books shelf in the UL at
            Cambridge this afternoon. It seems to me that it is not concerned with
            lines of research into the origins of the codex format book or the
            Nomina Sacra, but rather with the idea that the codex format book and
            the Nomina Sacra may well have been features of the "first edition of
            the New Testament" however they originated.

            Best wishes,
            BRIAN WILSON

            >HOMEPAGE *** RECENTLY UPDATED *** http://www.twonh.demon.co.uk/

            Rev B.E.Wilson,10 York Close,Godmanchester,Huntingdon,Cambs,PE29 2EB,UK
            > "What can be said at all can be said clearly; and whereof one cannot
            > speak thereof one must be silent." Ludwig Wittgenstein, "Tractatus".
            _

            Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
            List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.