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new/improved SP fonts

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  • James R. Adair
    Updated versions of the public-domain SP fonts are now available for downloading at ftp://shemesh.scholar.emory.edu/pub/fonts. Several of our existing fonts
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 18, 1998
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      Updated versions of the public-domain SP fonts are now available for
      downloading at ftp://shemesh.scholar.emory.edu/pub/fonts. Several of our
      existing fonts have been enhanced in one way or another. For example, the
      dotless d/r has been added to SPEdessa, sub-linear dots and circles (for
      transcriptions) have been added to SPTiberian, and an overstrike character
      for nomina sacra has been added to SPIonic. Two new fonts, SPDamascus and
      SPDoric have been created, and an italic version of SPAtlantis is also now
      available. A brief description of the fonts follows:

      SPTiberian: Our standard Hebrew/Aramaic font.

      SPDamascus: A thinner Hebrew/Aramaic font, which includes super-linear
      Palestinian vowel points. It may be used with SPTiberian in documents in
      which it is useful to distinguish Hebrew from Aramaic.

      SPEzra: A fixed-width Hebrew/Aramaic font.

      SPIonic: Our standard Greek font.

      SPDoric: A simpler, uncial font.

      SPAchmim: A Coptic font.

      SPEdessa: A Syriac Estrangela font.

      SPAtlantis: A transliteration font, with alphabetic characters and
      numerous diacritical and special characters, including subdots, superdots,
      macrons, breves, rockers (for H/h), and raise left and right half-rings
      (to transliterate ayin & alef, bzw.). An italic version of this font is
      also available.

      Note that these fonts were designed primarily for displaying non-Roman
      characters on Web pages, and they are the standard fonts used in _TC: A
      Journal of Bibical Textual Criticism_ (http://purl.org/TC). For this
      reason, the character maps for Macintoshes and Windows machines are
      identical in all the fonts. In addition to their intended use as display
      fonts, they also look reasonably good in print. Tell your friends!

      Jimmy Adair
      Manager of Information Technology Services, Scholars Press
      and
      Managing Editor of TELA, the Scholars Press World Wide Web Site
      -------------> http://shemesh.scholar.emory.edu <--------------
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