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  • Jim West
    True, Don, it is most likely a preference rather than a question of scholarship. Nevertheless, I do not think that the two can be so easily divorced. For
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 8 10:33 AM
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      True, Don, it is most likely a preference rather than a question of
      scholarship. Nevertheless, I do not think that the two can be so easily
      divorced. For example, if one has the choice of reading the NASB or a comic
      strip version of the Bible (which there actually are!!!)- it says a great
      deal about ones level (or lack thereof) of academic training.

      Likewise, I cast no aspersions of folk who listen to books on tape (though I
      personally find the whole thing rather distasteful); but I do wonder about
      the soul who will not read because listening is "easier". Note, I did not
      say you were in that category- I simply said that I find it hard to accept
      the notion that listening to a tape is better than reading a book.

      Further, memory studies seem to indicate that we recall more of what we read
      than what we hear. This means, doesn't it, that if we are genuinely
      interested in engaging with an idea or a set of ideas, we should probably
      read them rather than listen to them.

      All in all, I still think, academic questions aside, that listening to tapes
      is the easy, convenient, and lazy way to learn. But this is, honestly, to
      be expected in a consumer driven society like America where everything must
      be instant or "it ain't no good".

      In short, the boom in books on tape says more about our culture than it says
      about our interest in really learning something.


      Best,

      Jim

      ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
      Jim West, ThD
      Pastor, Petros Baptist Church
      Adjunct Professor of Bible,
      Quartz Hill School of Theology
      jwest@...
    • Jack Kilmon
      ... For some reason I cannot absorb anything from a tape. No matter how interesting the subject, it just become background noise. Besides, the pictures are
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 9 6:14 AM
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        Jim West wrote:

        > In short, the boom in books on tape says more about our culture than it says
        > about our interest in really learning something.

        For some reason I cannot absorb anything from a tape. No matter how
        interesting the subject, it just become background noise. Besides, the
        pictures are terrible.

        Jack
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