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Re: [Synoptic-L] Did Luke know Hebrew?

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  • Maluflen@aol.com
    In a message dated 3/4/01 1:57:46 PM Eastern Standard Time, brian@TwoNH.demon.co.uk writes:
    Message 1 of 39 , Mar 5, 2001
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      In a message dated 3/4/01 1:57:46 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      brian@... writes:

      << The question on my mind at the moment is why the birth narratives in the
      first two chapters of Luke contain dozens of OT quotations/allusions and
      yet not one instance of an agreement in wording with the Hebrew wording
      of the MT where this does not correspond to the Greek wording of the
      LXX. Is this because Luke has systematically gone through his Greek
      source material and assimilated the OT quotations/allusions to the Greek
      wording of the LXX ?>>


      Why do you not envision the possibility that Luke's "Greek sources" are
      principally Matt's infancy story and LXX OT narratives and poetry which Luke
      himself chooses to exploit in the attempt to do the same thing as, but better
      even than Matthew has done, namely to connect Jesus in numerous ways to OT
      preparations for and illuminations of his mission and identity? If you assume
      that someone else has done precisely this in Hebrew or Aramaic, underlying a
      Greek translation thereof to which Luke had access, why should one not
      imagine that Luke did all of this himself, with the Greek text of the Bible,
      even exploiting at times the meaning of well-known Hebrew names taken over
      into Greek? This requires a considerable degree of creativity on the part of
      Luke, but it also solves all your problems and avoids the inconvenience of
      hypothesized, and non-extant sources.

      Leonard Maluf

      Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
      List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
    • Stephen C. Carlson
      ... Philosophical is indeed my word, and I stand by it. I do apologize misquoting on the exact use of the term unscholarly. Nevertheless I feel it is an
      Message 39 of 39 , Mar 23, 2001
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        At 10:15 AM 3/23/01 +0000, Brian E. Wilson wrote:
        >Stephen Carlson wrote --
        >>What I'm having great difficulty understanding is the philosophical
        >>objection to providing a reconstruction, especially by stating it would
        >>be "unscholarly" to do so.
        >>
        >"Unscholarly" here is your word, not mine, as also the description
        >"philosophical".

        Philosophical is indeed my word, and I stand by it. I do apologize
        misquoting on the exact use of the term "unscholarly." Nevertheless
        I feel it is an accurate characterization of what you did write, as
        follows:

        At 11:50 AM 3/19/01 +0000, Brian E. Wilson wrote:
        >The scholar who
        >accepted your imposition would not be very scholarly to my mind.

        Later in the 3/23 message you write:

        >I am putting together what hopefully will be a monograph of about 50,000
        >words on the LTH. I am very close to finishing. And yes, it will
        >include my file of the complete provisional table of contents of the
        >Greek Logia accompanied by reasons why this reconstruction cannot be
        >used to check the Logia Translation Hypothesis. Also answers to many
        >other questions are set out.

        This sounds wonderful. I am very much looking to forward to
        its publication.

        Stephen Carlson
        --
        Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
        Synoptic Problem Home Page http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/
        "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35

        Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
        List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
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