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[Synoptic-L] Matthew and Galilee

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  • Maluflen@aol.com
    I mistakenly sent the following message to Synoptic-S instead of to Synoptic-L: In a message dated 11/1/2000 7:52:02 AM Eastern Standard Time,
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 1, 2000
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      I mistakenly sent the following message to Synoptic-S instead of to
      Synoptic-L:


      In a message dated 11/1/2000 7:52:02 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      kloppen@... writes:

      << I was concerned to reconstruct the social
      and economic situation of the Galilee(s) independently of any
      reading of Q, and to "read Q in Galilee" only once the
      reconstruction was done, as a kind of test to see whether Q's
      particular rhetoric appeared to fit this situation. As it turned
      out, it seemed to me that Q can be read successfully in
      Galilee, with Q's focus on issues such as loans and debt
      forgiveness (not a problem exclusive to Galilee, but clearly a
      problem there); its ambivalent attitudes toward Jerusalem, the
      Temple, tithing, and purity distinctions; and Q's negative
      characterization of urban life.

      This reading of Q, I think, gives some concreteness to a
      reading of Q and if the reading is cogent, that is its advantage.
      The reconstruction of the situation of the Galilee, caught
      politically between the pagan cities of the coastal region
      (Ptolemais, Tyre, Sidon) to the north and west, and Jerusalem
      to the south helps to make sense for me of certain elements
      of Q's rhetoric, which plays Gentiles against Jews in its
      shaming strategy. A setting the Galilee, where southern
      influence via the presence of Pharisees and others was neither
      strong nor uniformly welcome, makes sense of other features
      of Q's rhetoric. On the one hand, Q takes for granted the
      markers of Jewish identity (circumcision; sabbath observance;
      some forms of purity distinctions), but problematizes precisely
      those markers that were associated with a temple-oriented
      economy: tithing; and purity of vessels vs. the rapacity of
      representatives of the south.>>

      I find very interesting the apparently successful locating of Q in the
      Galilee. This would represent, I think, just one more aspect of Q that makes
      it indistinguishable from Matt (in line with the now fifty-year-old argument
      of Farrer, in "On Dispensing with Q"). I cannot imagine that the location of
      the post-resurrection commissioning of the eleven disciples in Matt (Matt
      28:16-20, a non-Q, but clearly Matthean passage) is unrelated to the place of
      origin of the Gospel itself, and the details about the social and economic
      issues of Galilee, as described by Professor Kloppenborg-Verbin, seem to me
      to likewise be characteristically Matthean concerns.

      Leonard Maluf

      Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
      List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
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