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Re: Matthean Irony (was: Re: Beast(s) ridden by Jesus)

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  • skelley@daemen.edu
    On 6/3/98 12:38PM, in message , Antonio ... I agree. With all due respect to Bob Fowler, I follow Mary Ann Tolbert on
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 3, 1998
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      On 6/3/98 12:38PM, in message <01bd8f0e$0a68db00$LocalHost@antonioj>, "Antonio
      Jerez" <antonio.jerez@...> wrote:
      >
      > I know that Robert Fowler has argued for this interpretation of
      > the Centurions words in "Let the reader understand". But I think
      > this may be a case where we are reading just too much irony
      > into Mark's text. Why is this "clearly ironic"? Is there something
      > in the greek that makes the Centurions words mocking and not
      > just simply reverential?
      >

      I agree. With all due respect to Bob Fowler, I follow Mary Ann Tolbert on this
      one. If the Centurion's words are a confession of faith, however, they are not
      without a certain amount of irony. Jesus spends much of Mark trying to open
      the disciple's eyes to the meaning of the cross and, despite his best efforts,
      is unable to do so. Then the Centurion, who (presumably) has never heard Jesus
      teach, recognizes that he's the Messiah by the way he dies. Its dramatic
      irony, but its ironic nonetheless- and it fits in with a lot of Mark's overall
      themes.

      Shawn Kelley
      skelley@...
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