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[Synoptic-L] Synoptics Synopsis?

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  • Kyle Dillon
    http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/harmony/ I m looking for a book that follows the example of the above web site, in which Synoptic pericopes can be
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 1, 2000
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      I'm looking for a book that follows the example of the above web site, in which Synoptic pericopes can be viewed alongside their parallels in the other Gospels, preferably in Greek. Does such a book even exist?
       
      Kyle Dillon
    • Mark Goodacre
      ... There are two leading contemporary Greek Synopses: Albert Huck, _Synopsis of the First Three Gospels_, 13th edition, fundamentally revised by Heinrich
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 2, 2000
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        On 1 Jul 00, at 22:07, Kyle Dillon wrote:

        > http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/harmony/
        >
        > I'm looking for a book that follows the example of the above web site, in
        > which Synoptic pericopes can be viewed alongside their parallels in the
        > other Gospels, preferably in Greek. Does such a book even exist?

        There are two leading contemporary Greek Synopses:

        Albert Huck, _Synopsis of the First Three Gospels_, 13th edition,
        fundamentally revised by Heinrich Greeven (Tübingen: J. C. B. Mohr (Paul
        Siebeck), 1981)

        Kurt Aland, Synopsis Quattuor Evangeliorum (Editio quindecima revisa;
        Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 1996, 1997).

        It is worth attempting to get the 15th addition of the Aland Synopsis because
        it has a major new appendix 1: Evangelium Thomae copticum, prepared by
        Hans-Gebhard Bethge.

        In theory at least you can get hold of Aland from your nearest Bible Society,
        though when I checked a little while ago very few of them, especially in the
        States, were stocking the latest (15th) edition.

        Hope this is the kind of thing you meant. I'm afraid there is not yet a
        complete published Synopsis that has the kind of colouring that makes
        Stephen Carlson's useful. I understand, though, that adherents of the
        Griesbach ("Two Gospel" hypothesis) are currently producing a complete
        Synopsis in colour and you can see samples at:

        http://www.colby.edu/rel/2gh/synopsis/titlepage.html


        Mark

        ---------------------------
        Dr Mark Goodacre mailto:M.S.Goodacre@...
        Dept of Theology
        University of Birmingham Fax.: +44 (0)121 414 6866
        Birmingham B15 2TT Tel.: +44 (0)121 414 7512

        http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/goodacre
        Homepage
        http://www.ntgateway.com
        The New Testament Gateway
      • David Barrett Peabody
        ... Kyle et al., Here are some details about one of the synopses Mark has mentioned above. A new electronic color-coded synopsis of *Mark* on CD-ROM will be
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 2, 2000
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          >From: "Mark Goodacre" <M.S.Goodacre@...>

          >I'm afraid there is not yet a
          >complete published Synopsis that has the kind of colouring that makes
          >Stephen Carlson's useful. I understand, though, that adherents of the
          >Griesbach ("Two Gospel" hypothesis) are currently producing a complete
          >Synopsis in colour and you can see samples at:
          >
          >http://www.colby.edu/rel/2gh/synopsis/titlepage.html

          Kyle et al.,

          Here are some details about one of the synopses Mark has mentioned above.

          A new electronic color-coded synopsis of *Mark* on CD-ROM will be available
          for preview at the Trinity Press International booth during the annual
          meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature in Nashville in November 2000.

          This synopsis includes the complete text of the gospel of Mark and
          parallels. In order to display all of the relevant evidence we have often
          utilized more than the usual two or three columns. For instance, the
          synopsis for Mark 4:21-25 includes nine columns. The one for Mark l:2-3
          includes seven.

          We have utilized boxes to indicate material that has either been transposed
          within a pericope or moved to another literary context altogether. Another
          type of line coding highlights the direction of dominant or exclusive
          dependence between Mark and either Matthew or Luke. Sometimes, of course,
          the dependence is equally distributed among all three of the synoptics and
          the line coding can indicate this, too.

          Every verbatim agreement among all three synoptics is color coded in blue
          with solid underlining. Every partial agreement (same word, different
          grammatical form) among all three is also color coded in blue with dashed
          underlining. If there is verbatim agreement between two and partial
          agreement between another two of the synoptics within the triple tradition,
          all are color coded in blue, but the two in full agreement are underlined
          and the third in partial agreement has dashed underlining.

          Agreements between Matthew and Mark apart from a Lukan parallel are
          similarly underlined, but color coded in cyan (magenta in the old samples
          still available on-line). Those between Mark and Luke are in green. Those
          between Matthew and Luke are in red. We have utilized black underlining to
          note parallels with other texts, such as passages from the LXX or the
          letters of Paul. We have also used full underlining or dashed underlining in
          black to highlight verbal identities or similarities between two or more
          contexts within a single gospel.

          Following the work of David L. Dungan on synopses and synopsis making,
          published in *Biblica,* we have been convinced by the evidence that no
          synopsis can be multi-purpose. That is, no synopsis can be constructed that
          is equally valuable for text criticism, source criticism, redaction
          criticism, tradition history, etc. We also know from David's work and
          personal experience that the construction of a synopsis that is "neutral,"
          even with regard to the single issue of source criticism, is impossible, the
          continuing protestations of some other synopsis makers notwithstanding.

          This synopsis is, therefore, specifically constructed to best present the
          literary evidence in support of the neo-Griesbach or Two Gospel Hypothesis
          and, for the moment, only one aspect of that hypothesis, i. e. Mark's use of
          Matthew and Luke. We expect to bundle the CD containing this Markan synopsis
          with the following, forthcoming volume:

          David Barrett Peabody with Lamar Cope and Allan J. McNicol, eds., *Beyond
          the Impasse of Markan Priority. Mark's Use of Matthew and Luke. A
          Demonstration by the Research Team of the International Institute for
          Renewal of Gospel Studies* (Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International,
          November 2001) approx. xl + 300pp. In addition to the three editors,
          co-authors include David L. Dungan, William R. Farmer, Thomas R. W.
          Longstaff and Philip L. Shuler.

          At a later date, the co-authors of this Markan synopsis, Peabody and
          Longstaff, plan to expand it with another section that will best illustrate
          Luke's use of Matthew. This section of the synopsis will, therefore not only
          include all of the parallels to Mark in Mt and Lk, but also all of the
          parallels between Matthew and Luke that are not shared by Mark as well as
          all of the material in either Mt or Lk that has no parallel in either of the
          other two synoptic gospels. Peabody, who developed the synoptic arrangements
          for the "Markan" synopsis and Longstaff who developed its electronic
          formatting and interfacing will again collaborate on a "complete"
          neo-Griesbach (Two Gospel) color-coded electronic synopsis. At the moment we
          expect to publish such a complete synopsis, again on CD-ROM but separately,
          in the next two or three years.

          All of us who have worked on this forthcoming book on Mark's Use of Mt and
          Lk and especially Tom and I who have produced the accompanying Markan
          synopsis cordially invite all interested members/readers of Synoptic-L,
          along with any and all other interested scholars, to join us at the TPI
          booth during the annual meeting of the SBL in Nashville this year to preview
          and "test drive" this new synopsis on CD-ROM.

          Sincerely,

          David Barrett Peabody
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