Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [Synoptic-L] First Edition of Luke

Expand Messages
  • Maluflen@aol.com
    In a message dated 6/16/2000 6:18:21 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Maluflen@aol.com writes:
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 16, 2000
      In a message dated 6/16/2000 6:18:21 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
      Maluflen@... writes:

      << Again, a serious misunderstanding here, and no argument in favor of an
      infancy-narrativeless original edition of Luke. Indeed the Spirit's activity
      is concentrated in Jesus during his ministry. And this spirit becomes the
      spirit that inspires and directs the apostolic activity of the apostles in
      Acts - a new beginning dramatized in Acts 2 by the Pentecost scene. However,
      Luke is certainly aware of a period of prophetic preparation for the coming
      of Jesus in the entire OT. Now it is to these OT times that the father and
      mother of Zechariah, and John himself, belong. Or rather, they and the other
      characters (except Mary) in Luke's infancy narrative concretely
      represent=Symbolize this period in the writing of Luke (I would say). Cf.
      for
      example the references to the spirit-inspired David in Acts 1:16; 4:25,
      etc.>>

      For clarity's sake, I would rearrange the sentences in the above paragraph as
      follows:

      Again, a serious misunderstanding here, and no argument in favor of an
      infancy-narrativeless original edition of Luke. Indeed the Spirit's activity
      is concentrated in Jesus during his ministry. And this spirit becomes the
      spirit that inspires and directs the apostolic activity of the apostles in
      Acts - a new beginning dramatized in Acts 2 by the Pentecost scene. However,
      Luke is certainly aware of a period of prophetic preparation for the coming
      of Jesus in the entire OT. (Cf. for example the references to the
      spirit-inspired David in Acts 1:16; 4:25, etc.) Now it is to these OT times
      that the father and
      mother of Zechariah, and John the Baptist himself, belong. Or rather, they
      and the other characters (except Mary) in Luke's infancy narrative concretely
      represent=symbolize this period in the writing of Luke (I would say).

      Leonard Maluf
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.