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Re: [Synoptic-L] mary magdalene

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  • Maluflen@aol.com
    In a message dated 6/6/2000 11:14:47 AM Eastern Daylight Time, mauros@iol.ie writes:
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 14, 2000
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      In a message dated 6/6/2000 11:14:47 AM Eastern Daylight Time, mauros@...
      writes:

      << Be that as it may, the title that most intrigues me is:
      Saxer, Victor. "Marie Madeleine dans le commentaire d'Hippolyte sur le
      Cantique des Cantiques." Revue bénédictine 101 (1991): 219 - 239.

      As I do not have French ( or access to this publication ) perhaps someone
      who has both could provide a precis?
      >>
      In a message dated 6/6/2000 11:14:47 AM Eastern Daylight Time, mauros@...
      writes:

      << Be that as it may, the title that most intrigues me is:
      Saxer, Victor. "Marie Madeleine dans le commentaire d'Hippolyte sur le
      Cantique des Cantiques." Revue bénédictine 101 (1991): 219 - 239.

      As I do not have French ( or access to this publication ) perhaps someone
      who has both could provide a precis?>>

      At the time I read the above, I was living at what is equivalently the world
      headquarters of the Benedictine Confederation, Collegio di Sant'Anselmo in
      Rome; accordingly, I felt obliged to track down this article in the library,
      which I did. I never got it copied, so I don't have it in front of me as I
      write, but the following notes I took (reading through it very hastily) might
      be helpful.

      The article has the following subdivisions:

      1. Hippolytus' Commentary on the Song of Songs;
      2.The Passage on Magdalene;
      3. Hyppolytus' exegesis in the commentary;
      4. Magdalene in the commentary;

      The passage on Mary Magdalene is found in chapters 24 and 25 of the
      commentary, containing H's comments on Song of Songs 3:1-4. The Greek text
      has not survived (and it is also thought by most scholars, according to
      Saxer, that the Hyppolytus who wrote this commentary is not the same person
      as the second century Hyppolytus who was making headlines in the West, but a
      roughly contemporary writer, with the same name, in the East). Saxer gives a
      French translation of the entire passage (the first ever, as far as he knows)
      based on a Latin version (by Gerard Garrite), itself based on Georgian and
      Armenian originals, and an English translation by Stewart Dingwell Fordyce
      Salmond in 1868. The style of the passage is somewhere between the
      testimonial form and a commentary proper, and in particular it comments on
      Song of Songs 3:1-4 by paralleling it with Jn 20:11-18. Luke 24:1-5, as well
      as the Matthean version of the women at the tomb story are also clearly used
      by H. (My impression is that nothing distinctive is taken from the Gospel of
      Mark, though Saxer cites Mark a couple of times, in passages that have a
      Matthean parallel). A few more points:


      1. Nothing at all is said about the women who appear in the various Synoptic
      stories that speak about anointing Jesus' head or feet during his lifetime.
      Only the tomb narratives are exploited.

      2. We do find here for the first time a reference to the women at the tomb as
      "apostles of the apostles ".

      3. Hyppolytus is not interested in Mary Magdalene, or even the women as a
      group, in themselves: they are, for him, a symbol of the Church (which he
      calls "the Synagogue", so, clearly thinking of Judeo-Christianity);

      4. Strangely, he often refers to the women in the plural, without naming any
      names, even when apparently following the text of Jn 20, which speaks only of
      M.M.

      5. Where he does give names, Hyppolytus usually mentions two women, Martha
      (!) and Mary Magdalene, in that order, and at one point, if I remember
      correctly, he actually mentions Martha alone.

      Perhaps my memory would be further jogged if anyone has questions on the
      above. In general, though, I suspect that the passage is less interesting
      than might have been thought from the title of Saxer's article.

      Leonard Maluf
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