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[Synoptic-L] pericopes all

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  • Brian E. Wilson
    Brian Wilson wrote -- ... Tim Reynolds replied -- ... Tim, Clearly we can explain easily why one writer used pericopes for all his material, and therefore why
    Message 1 of 3 , May 14, 2000
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      Brian Wilson wrote --
      >
      >In the Gospel of John, the story of Lazarus extends for more than a
      >chapter, from Jn 11.1 to Jn 12.11, which is just under 1,000 words.
      >Similarly in Acts, the story of Stephen extends for over a chapter,
      >from Acts 6.8 to Acts 8.1, and is about 1,160 and words long. Such
      >longer speeches/narratives are not found in the material special to
      >any synoptic gospel. Can anyone explain why the material special to
      >each synoptic gospel divides into relatively short pericopes in the
      >same way as does the remainder of the synoptic gospels? Why seemingly
      >the same "thumb-print" in all three cases?
      >
      Tim Reynolds replied --
      >
      >Mk comes in pericopes because Peter came in pericopes, "adapting his
      >teaching to the occasion, without making a systematic arrangements of
      >the Lord's sayings", Papias says.
      >
      Tim,
      Clearly we can explain easily why one writer used pericopes for all
      his material, and therefore why he used it for the material special to
      his gospel. The question is about all three synoptic gospels, however.
      What about special-Matthew and special-Luke?

      Even if Mark did use pericopes for all his material, why did Matthew use
      short pericopes for the large amount of material special to his gospel,
      and why did Luke also use short pericopes for his even larger amount of
      special material?

      Best wishes,
      BRIAN WILSON

      EM brian@... HP www.twonh.demon.co.uk TEL+44(0)1480385043
      Rev B.E.Wilson,10 York Close,Godmanchester,Huntingdon,Cambs,PE18 8EB,UK
      > "What can be said at all can be said clearly; and whereof one cannot
      > speak thereof one must be silent." Ludwig Wittgenstein, "Tractatus".
      _
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