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[Synoptic-L] Prolog of Luke

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  • Wieland Willker
    I vaguely remember that the prolog of Luke resembles another prolog of that time: A treatise written by a medical doctor. It was speculated that Luke maybe
    Message 1 of 2 , May 2 3:24 AM
      I vaguely remember that the prolog of Luke resembles another prolog of that
      time: A treatise written by a medical doctor. It was speculated that Luke
      maybe knew this work (as a doctor himself) and adopted the intro.
      Unfortunately I cannot remember anymore what this was.
      Name? Title? Greek text source? Any info appreciated!


      Best wishes
      Wieland
      ---------------
      mailto:willker@...-bremen.de
      http://www.uni-bremen.de/~wie
    • Maluflen@aol.com
      In a message dated 5/2/2000 6:33:34 AM Eastern Daylight Time, willker@chemie.uni-bremen.de writes:
      Message 2 of 2 , May 2 4:22 AM
        In a message dated 5/2/2000 6:33:34 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
        willker@...-bremen.de writes:

        << I vaguely remember that the prolog of Luke resembles another prolog of that
        time: A treatise written by a medical doctor. It was speculated that Luke
        maybe knew this work (as a doctor himself) and adopted the intro.
        Unfortunately I cannot remember anymore what this was.
        Name? Title? Greek text source? Any info appreciated!>>

        Lovedale Alexander has written extensively on this topic, beginning with a
        1986 (?) article in NT, and followed, closely thereafter, with a monograph in
        the Sheffield Series (?). You may be thinking of the second century treatise
        by Galen "On the Natural Faculties", though this is by no means the closest
        parallel in classical sources to the prologue of Luke. Alexander's main
        thesis in both article and book is that Luke's prologue resembles most
        closely the prologues of semi-popular scientific treatises, rather than the
        prologues of historical works (though there are also significant parallels
        with these). At the close of her NT article she cites a number of the closest
        parallels she found in classical literature. I believe that these include
        the prefaces to Josephus' two-volume work Contra Apion and the Greek preface
        to Sirach. As I write, it occurs to me that there was another, more obscure
        first-century medical author cited by Alexander with an even closer parallel
        to Luke 1:1-4. Was it Dioscorides (Peri iatrikes hyles..?) or something like
        that (sometimes referred to in Latin as De materia medica)?

        Leonard Maluf
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