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(Fwd) Re: EIS = into in Mark 1.10?

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  • Mark Goodacre
    Forwarded for Jeffrey Gibson whose attempt to post this to Synoptic-L did not work. Jeffrey is currently using his alternative address:
    Message 1 of 1 , May 9, 1998
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      Forwarded for Jeffrey Gibson whose attempt to post this
      to Synoptic-L did not work. Jeffrey is currently using his
      alternative address: jgibson000@...

      Mark

      ------------

      On Wed, 6 May 1998, in response to Mark Goodacre's question re:
      > >
      > >What do others think? Are there any good grounds for going for
      > >'upon' instead of 'into' here?

      Carl W. Conrad wrote:

      > Well, I think that there are at least AS GOOD grounds: I'd
      > understand it as "onto"--just as one boards a ship, EISBAINEI EIS TO
      > PLOION. You may say that implies "to the inside of the boundaries
      > of"--yes, but it doesn't necessarily imply "below the surface of."
      > I'd still be inclined to think we have an echo here of OT usage of
      > the RUACH-YHWH coming "upon" a person, be it a judge or a prophet.

      I offer three other considerations in favour of "onto" rather than
      into.

      1. In Mk. 1:11 we have the second of the two revelatory events that
      Mark reports as occuring at Jesus' baptism, the famous voice from
      heaven, which apparantly is an interpretation of the significance of
      the Spirit's descent. Now if, as many note, the voice contains an echo
      Is. 42:1, then there would seem to be evidence that in Mk 1:10 Mark
      uses EIS with the sense of EPI. For the Isaian text speaks of God
      putting his spirit "upon" his elect.

      2. In vs 12 we have a notice which speaks of the same Spirit which has
      descended EIS Jesus then "driving" (EKBALLW) Jesus into the
      wilderness. Since EKBALLW is used elsewhere by Mark to describe not
      complusion from within, but a force acting externally upon some person
      or object, then, in 1:12 this Spirit is external to Jesus. And if
      external to Jesus, then the the preupposition in vs. 10 is that the
      Spirit has only come upon Jesus.

      3. there is the testimony of T. Levi 18:6-7.

      The heavens will be opened
      and from the temple of glory sanctification will come upon him,
      with a fatherly voice, as from Abraham to Isaac.
      And the glory of the most high shall burst forth *upon* him.
      And the spirit of understanding and sanctification
      shall rest *upon* him [in the water]

      The parallels are too close to be coincidental. If Mark is referring
      to this text in his Baptismal story, then, though he writes EIS, he is
      obviously thinking EPI. If T. Levi is dependent upon Mark, then we
      have an independent witness to how Mk 1:10 was understood.

      Jeffrey Gibson
      jgibson@...
      jgibson000@...
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