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[Synoptic-L] Mark and 2 Macc

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  • Stephen C. Carlson
    As you all may know, Augustine was the first to posit an actual literary basis for the composition of the gospels, stating that Mark seems to have followed
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 8, 1999
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      As you all may know, Augustine was the first to posit an
      actual literary basis for the composition of the gospels,
      stating that "Mark seems to have followed closely after
      him [sc. Matthew] like someone following on his footsteps
      and abbreviating him." (DE CONSENSU EVANGELISTARUM I.4)

      This view was critiqued by Streeter, FOUR GOSPELS (1924),
      among others, who argues that "only a lunatic would leave
      out Matthew's account ... in order to get room for purely
      verbal expansion of what was retained." (p. 158) Although
      E.P. Sanders had his doubts about the Streeter's argument
      (TENDENCIES (1969), p. 85), it seems that most people have
      followed Streeter's critique (see, e.g., Stein, SYNOPTIC
      PROBLEM (1987) p.45).

      For unrelated reasons, I was reading the ANCHOR BIBLE
      DICTIONARY article on Second Maccabees, vol. 4, p. 442,
      in which Thomas Fischer (Cryer trans.) stated that:

      The somewhat verbose epitomizer (or abridger),
      who modestly remained anonymous, abbreviated
      the five books of Jason . . . into a single
      book . . . . This redactor organized and
      partly expanded the contents, as was the current
      practice . . . . (Parentheticals omitted).

      Is this behavior, however, what the supporters of
      Augustine and Griesbach allege on the part of Mark's
      use of Matthew: that he abridged Matthew, yet expanded
      the contents with the typical Markan flourishes (when
      Abiathar was high priest, Jesus sat on a cushion, etc.)?

      [I think the Jerusalem School posits a similar deed of
      Mark on Luke, but with some evidence that the Markan
      expansions are harder to translate into idiomatic Hebrew.]

      Is any one aware of any studies on the Synoptic Problem
      and Epitomization? Or is this a topic for a future Ph.D.?

      Stephen Carlson
      --
      Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
      Synoptic Problem Home Page http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/
      "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35
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