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RE: [Synoptic-L] Re: Synoptic Concordance?

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  • Jim West
    ... There is one way that books will always be better than computers--- you cant use a computer when the electricity is off... you cant use a computer when
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 17, 1999
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      At 08:04 AM 9/17/99 -0400, you wrote:
      >I strongly agree with Wieland and have not used a printed concordance in
      >years. It seems to me that electronic resources (such as Gramcord,
      >Accordance, Bibleworks, and others) give us a range of options and
      >capabilities that far exceed those of printed concordances. I would be
      >interested to hear from any participants who have found ways in which
      >printed concordances provide information important for our studies that we
      >cannot get with the electronic versions.

      There is one way that books will always be better than computers--- you cant
      use a computer when the electricity is off... you cant use a computer when
      your sitting on the beach (unless you are one of those slaves of technology
      who must always have your laptop at hand- in which case--- "be free!!!"),
      and you certainly cant set a computer on a table, open it up, flip its
      pages, and find what your lookng for with greater speed. In fact, it takes
      longer to tunr the computer on, boot it up, load the program, and then do
      your search than it does to simply open a book.

      Computers are making us lazy.

      > Indeed, I even believe that
      >synopses will evolve in the direction of electronic rather than print
      >media - although we are at the early stages of that evolution.

      And what a sad day it will be when, rather than using our own minds to parse
      words or locate passages or look up verses we will simply let a machine do
      it for us. In fact, taken to its logical conclusion, there is no further
      need for study as we can soon simply ask a computer what a passage says and
      it will tell us... all hail the new computer age when men are mere
      operators and computers are the dispensers of truth!! ;-P

      Best,

      Jim

      +++++++++++++++++++++++++
      Jim West, ThD
      email- jwest@...
      web page- http://web.infoave.net/~jwest
    • Stephen C. Carlson
      ... I m not aware of electronic resources that will match up the synoptic parallels for you (though I hope to discover some at the booths at SBL), but even so,
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 18, 1999
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        At 08:04 AM 9/17/99 -0400, Thomas R. W. Longstaff wrote:
        >I strongly agree with Wieland and have not used a printed concordance in
        >years. It seems to me that electronic resources (such as Gramcord,
        >Accordance, Bibleworks, and others) give us a range of options and
        >capabilities that far exceed those of printed concordances. I would be
        >interested to hear from any participants who have found ways in which
        >printed concordances provide information important for our studies that we
        >cannot get with the electronic versions. Indeed, I even believe that
        >synopses will evolve in the direction of electronic rather than print
        >media - although we are at the early stages of that evolution.

        I'm not aware of electronic resources that will match up the synoptic
        parallels for you (though I hope to discover some at the booths at
        SBL), but even so, I feel that, aside from the searching and look up,
        many paper resources are simply more practicable and easier on the
        eyes to read. (There are exceptions: e.g. UBS4!)

        I think that paper currently has the following advantages over
        electronic:

        1. Greek text is displayed better on paper. A lot the Greek
        electronic fonts in my experience are clunky and ugly at
        the resolutions commonly supported by monitors.

        2. I like to have a lot of different books open and spread out
        over my work area to facilitate checking each resources. On
        the other hand, multiple windows clutter my screen and dog my
        computer's performance.

        3. While it is easier to search for a particular word in an
        electronic resource, it is easier to browse for no word
        in particular in a paper resource.

        4. Jim West pointed out the low-tech advantages when power
        goes out. (Advantageous only in the day though.)

        At any rate, synoptic concordances, whether paper or electronic,
        suffer from many of the same problems as "neutral" synopses that
        were identified by Dungan.

        Stephen Carlson
        --
        Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
        Synoptic Problem Home Page http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/
        "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35
      • Jeff Peterson
        ... On behalf of all Luddite lurkers (some of them perhaps trying to remember how to use the reply function), I concede the point for most searches, but the
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 20, 1999
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          At 8:04 AM -0400 9/17/99, Thomas R. W. Longstaff wrote:
          >I strongly agree with Wieland and have not used a printed concordance in
          >years. It seems to me that electronic resources (such as Gramcord,
          >Accordance, Bibleworks, and others) give us a range of options and
          >capabilities that far exceed those of printed concordances. I would be
          >interested to hear from any participants who have found ways in which
          >printed concordances provide information important for our studies that we
          >cannot get with the electronic versions.

          On behalf of all Luddite lurkers (some of them perhaps trying to remember
          how to use the "reply" function), I concede the point for most searches,
          but the clear advantage of Hoffman's new concordance over AcCordance etc.
          is the collection of Synoptic parallels for comparison at a glance; are
          there programs available that will display search results in this fashion?
          (I developed an argument that this advantage warrants a $175.00 purchase x
          4, but as my wife did not find it persuasive I'll omit it here.)

          By way of a further modest joust at technological windmills, I would not be
          without my Schmoller, and certainly not during a seminar, where the volume
          can be consulted without interrupting the flow of discussion, whereas
          accessing an electronic concordance would be (a) impractical in most
          seminar rooms and (b) even where available, distracting to the participants
          -- like having a video game running in the corner. But maybe others are
          better than I am at anticipating what lexical data will prove relevant in a
          given discussion!

          Jeff

          ------------------------------------
          Jeffrey Peterson
          Institute for Christian Studies
          Austin, Texas, USA
          ------------------------------------
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