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Storr (1786), the proto-Farrerite

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  • Stephen C. Carlson
    Following a tip in Farmer s SYNOPTIC PROBLEM ( Marsh then notes that this [scil. successive dependence] limits the investigator to six possible cases.
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 1, 1999
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      Following a tip in Farmer's SYNOPTIC PROBLEM ("Marsh then notes that this
      [scil. successive dependence] limits the investigator to six possible cases.
      Thereupon he lists the six cases and cites names of scholars who defend
      each case." p.12), I decided to look up Herbert Marsh's dissertation on
      the origins of the three first gospels (1801) to determine who, if anyone,
      advocated a Farrer-type hypothesis in the earliest decades of the modern
      consideration of the synoptic problem.

      The first of the six possible configurations that Marsh listed is the
      Farrer Hypothesis, that Matthew used Mark, and Luke used both Matthew
      and Mark. The only critic Marsh listed in support of this configuration
      is "partly by Storr". Marsh stated that Storr affirmed that Matthew
      and Luke used Mark, but was undecided whether Luke used Matthew or
      whether the translator of Matthew used Luke. I am concerned about the
      latter option because it suggests that Storr's Matthew and/or Mark was
      not a Greek document, which places Storr further afield from the FH.

      Therefore, can anyone having access to Gottlob Christian Storr, Über
      den Zweck der evangelischen Geschichte und der Briefe Johannis, Tübingen
      (1786), pp.274ff, 287ff. confirm or deny Marsh's description of Storr's
      views?

      Thanks,

      Stephen Carlson
      --
      Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
      Synoptic Problem Home Page http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/
      "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35
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