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Re: words interpreting the meal

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  • Yuri Kuchinsky
    ... I agree, David. ... Your about that time is well put. The main problem here is the chronology inconsistency between the Synoptic account, and Jn. For Jn,
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 18, 1998
      On 17 Mar 1998, D Mealand wrote:

      > In connection with the large number of vexed questions about the
      > earliest account of the last meal - the question of its possible
      > Passover character is one of the more complex ones.

      I agree, David.

      > I do not wish to rehearse the long debate. Even if not a full Passover
      > meal it was either a) held at about that time or

      Your "about that time" is well put. The main problem here is the
      chronology inconsistency between the Synoptic account, and Jn. For Jn, it
      is a "pre-passover meal", since Jn puts the Last Supper one day earlier.

      > b) "remembered" as a
      > Passover meal at least by some.

      Agreed.

      > My question is this. Has enough attention been paid to what some have
      > noted, namely that there are interpretative words relating to the bread
      > at Passover but not (as far as I am aware) to the cup?

      Do you mean to say Passover Seders don't have such interpretative words?
      But there are many kinds of Seders. I know that today normally Seders
      involve quite a lot of drinking.

      > "This is the bread of affliction which our ancestors ate in the land of
      > Egypt"

      I'm not quite sure where is this quote from.

      > presumably has some connection with the interpretative words
      > which we find in the various NT accounts of the meal. The fact that
      > there seem to be no similar words relating to the cup(s) at Passover
      > and the even greater diversity in the cup sections of the NT accounts
      > may therefore be significant?

      I'm aware of the work of Hans Lietzmann on the eucharist. He suggested
      that the earliest Christian eucharist was the "bread-only", or the
      "bread-and-water" eucharist. I'm not sure how widely this view is accepted
      today.

      Best regards,

      Yuri.
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