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js 12-12-98

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  • yochanan bitan
    Notes from the Shabbat Evening Synoptic Gospels Sessions December 12, 1998 Pericope: Persecutions foretold (Luke 21:12-19; Luke 12:11-12; Mark 13:9-13; Matthew
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 29, 1999
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      Notes from the Shabbat Evening Synoptic Gospels Sessions
      December 12, 1998

      Pericope: Persecutions foretold (Luke 21:12-19; Luke 12:11-12; Mark
      13:9-13; Matthew 10:17-22a)

      **We continued an ongoing treatment of the Synoptic Apocalypse. We focused
      very little upon the synoptic presentation of this pericope and rather gave
      a more focused attention to the Lukan doublet.

      **The occurrence of epibalousin...tas ceiras autwn seems to reflect the
      Hebraic construction lishloaH yad. Also, it was noted that the LXX of
      Esther 6.2 uses the plural construction (ceiras) as perhaps here in Luke as
      opposed to the more common Hebrew singular (yad).

      **Notley observed that the saying in Luke 21 mentions persecutions and
      Gentile rulers both of which are lacking in the doublet in Luke 12. He
      commented that the saying in Luke 12 lacks any antagonistic manner; there,
      it simply portrays Jesus assuring his disciples when they are brought into
      the synagogues to bear testimony the Holy Spirit will teach them. Thus,
      due in part to the introduction of persecutions and foreign rulers, Notley
      commented on what appeared to him as the secondary nature of Luke 21.

      **The word paradidontes in verse 12 of Luke 21 reflects the Hebrew limsor.

      **The phrase in Luke 21:14 qete oun en tais kardiais umwn superficially
      appeared to be a Hebraic construction, lasim balev, but this phrase does
      not occur in Hebrew. One rather finds the construction lasim `al lev.
      This, the LXX renders as qete en tais kardiais (see Jeremiah 12:11).
      Furthermore, upon further examination it appears that this construction
      actually is good Greek, for one finds it frequently in the LXX where it is
      not represented exactly by the Hebrew (1 Sam. 9:20; 20:9, 10; 2 Sam. 13:20;
      Ps. 48:10; Ecc. 7:21; Job 11:13; and Hag. 1:7).

      **Notley and Bivin both commented on the ease with which one could
      translate word for word the text of Luke 12:11-12 from Greek into Hebrew,
      and the relative difficulty which Luke 21:12-19 produced in a similar
      exercise. Concluding, therefore, that Luke 12:11-12 has preserved the text
      more faithfully, while the differences between Luke 12 and 21 could reflect
      the use of two different sources.

      **The doublet in Luke 12 reflects the Jewish conception of the Holy Spirit
      as pedagogue. This has been changed in the text of Luke 21 where it says
      egw gar dwsw umin stomakai sofian. This was a Greek hendiadys and not a
      Hebraic. Joseph noted the parallel between this language and that of
      Exodus 4:12 where God spoke to Moses: ve`ata lex veehye `im pixa vehoretixa
      asher tedabber (cf. also Is. 49:2).

      (Abstract of M. Turnage) [coming next minutes: a matthean fatigue vis-a-vis
      luke]
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