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  • Brian E. Wilson
    I wonder whether there is a definition of the synoptic problem which includes a method of solving it? Best wishes, Brian E. Wilson
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 11, 1998
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      I wonder whether there is a definition of the synoptic problem which
      includes a method of solving it?

      Best wishes,
      Brian E. Wilson
    • Brian E. Wilson
      ... Nan Doerr replied - ... My definition is - The synoptic problem is to put forward a hypothesis of the links between the synoptic gospels which is
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 12, 1998
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        Brian Wilson wrote:
        > I wonder whether there is a definition of the synoptic problem which
        > includes a method of solving it?
        Nan Doerr replied -
        >Brian, it appears to me that if such a definition (including a method
        >for solution) existed, then the problem would already be solved and
        >there would be no reason for this forum.

        My definition is - "The synoptic problem is to put forward a hypothesis
        of the links between the synoptic gospels which is compatible with the
        patterns of similarities and differences of wording and order observed
        in the synoptic gospels."

        I am not suggesting that my method (which is stated below) is included
        in the above definition, though perhaps the method can be partly
        inferred from the definition.

        The method I use is to take one synoptic hypothesis at a time and check
        that it is compatible with all observed patterns of similarities and
        differences of wording and order observed in the synoptic gospels (for
        example, the triple tradition, the minor agreements, the doublets unique
        to each synoptic gospel, the existence of material special to each
        synoptic gospel, and so on). If a hypothesis is shown not to be
        compatible with one or more patterns observed, then it is not a
        solution. If it is compatible with all the observed patterns, then it
        does solve the synoptic problem. If more than one solution is obtained,
        these should be listed.

        Using this method, I have found one solution to the synoptic problem as
        defined above. I know of no others, except trivial complications of it.

        I would be very interested to hear what others have to say about
        my method or their own methods of solving the synoptic problem.

        Best wishes,

        BRIAN WILSON
      • Antonio Jerez
        ... Greetings, I am normally very sceptical about any hypothesis dealing with the synoptic problem that claims to being able to explain just about any
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 13, 1998
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          Brian Wilson wrote:


          >Brian Wilson wrote:
          >> I wonder whether there is a definition of the synoptic problem which
          >> includes a method of solving it?


          >Nan Doerr replied -
          >>Brian, it appears to me that if such a definition (including a method
          >>for solution) existed, then the problem would already be solved and
          >>there would be no reason for this forum.

          Brian replied:
          >My definition is - "The synoptic problem is to put forward a hypothesis
          >of the links between the synoptic gospels which is compatible with the
          >patterns of similarities and differences of wording and order observed
          >in the synoptic gospels."
          >
          >I am not suggesting that my method (which is stated below) is included
          >in the above definition, though perhaps the method can be partly
          >inferred from the definition.
          >
          >The method I use is to take one synoptic hypothesis at a time and check
          >that it is compatible with all observed patterns of similarities and
          >differences of wording and order observed in the synoptic gospels (for
          >example, the triple tradition, the minor agreements, the doublets unique
          >to each synoptic gospel, the existence of material special to each
          >synoptic gospel, and so on). If a hypothesis is shown not to be
          >compatible with one or more patterns observed, then it is not a
          >solution. If it is compatible with all the observed patterns, then it
          >does solve the synoptic problem. If more than one solution is obtained,
          >these should be listed.
          >
          >Using this method, I have found one solution to the synoptic problem as
          >defined above. I know of no others, except trivial complications of it.
          >
          >I would be very interested to hear what others have to say about
          >my method or their own methods of solving the synoptic problem.

          Greetings,

          I am normally very sceptical about any hypothesis
          dealing with the synoptic problem that claims to being
          able to explain just about any incongruity in the texts that
          are available to us. Specially if the price to be paid for explaining
          everything is postulating a plethora of hypothetical sources
          that lie behind our present texts. Brian is as far as I know
          postulating at least two totally unknown hypothetical documents
          in his 2 Notebook hypothesis. A scholar like Boismard comes
          up with an even greater amount of hypothetical documents -
          protogospels and different editions abound in his solution to
          the synoptic problem.
          A hypothesis like the Farrer one may not be able to
          explain just about everything down to the most minimal
          jota, but I think it is enough if it can explain things to
          a fairly high degree without resorting to a lot of crisscrossing
          hypothetical documents.

          Best wishes

          Antonio Jerez
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