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Fwd: Re: [Synoptic-L] Re: Jesus Genealogies

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  • Chuck Jones
    Leaonard, Great stuff (I d ve loved to have been in that phone booth). So is it possible Luke deviates into a fictional line of Nathan in an effort to play
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 7, 2005
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      Leaonard,
       
      Great stuff (I'd've loved to have been in that phone booth).
       
      So is it possible Luke deviates into a fictional line of Nathan in an effort to play down traditional Messianic, throw-out-those-Roman-bastards expectations?  One of the cumulative goals/effects of Lk-Acts is to spiritualize the messianic kindgom from restored Solomonic, earthly spendor into the church.  (And so the deviation in the line begins with Nathan replacing Solomon....)
       
      Chuck

      Leaonard wrote:
      People who have read my doctoral dissertation (who could hold an assembly in a telephone booth) would not place 1:69 in this list of Lukan texts. In spite of the way it is frequently translated in modern hymn settings, the text does not speak of a "mighty savior from the house of David", but rather of a "horn of salvation [consisting] in the house of David...". It is connected with a kind of salvation that was normative in the OT, beginning with the exodus (alluded to in Lk 1:68), and operative in God's mighty salvation of his people from the enemy inhabitants of the land as mediated by Israel's royal figures, and especially the house of David. The type of salvation common to these eras of the exodus and the dwelling in the land, including that of the judges, is defined in 1:71. The first part of the Benedictus should therefore be read as a prophetic summary (with verbs in the aorist tense) of the past history of Israel as grateful beneficiary of a divine salvation of a certain type. Zechariah looks forward to the new era (with main verbs now in the future tense) in the second part of the text (1:76-79). Here, and in v.77 in particular, a new kind of salvation is predicted, envisioned and defined: a salvation in the forgiveness of "their" (the people's: see Matt 1:21b) sins. Luke thus associates David with a kind of salvation that he sees as in some sense antithetical to the salvation brought by Jesus. David is also contrasted with Jesus in the sermon of Peter in Acts 2 (see 2:29,31). While he lies rotting in the grave, one from his seed, Jesus, sits on his throne forever.. in fulfillment of God's promise.

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