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Re: who brought the staves and sandals? (was: Re: [Synoptic-L] the Priority o...

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  • Maluflen@aol.com
    n a message dated 7/3/2005 4:37:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... You are stretching the meaning of TROFH in this verse beyond tolerable limits, don t you
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 3, 2005
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      n a message dated 7/3/2005 4:37:26 PM Eastern Daylight Time, kenolson101@... writes:

      Matthew adds that they don't need to take sandals or
      staves either, because those will *also* be provided by the congregation;
      this is the point of "the worker is worthy of his maintenance."


      You are stretching the meaning of TROFH in this verse beyond tolerable limits, don't you think? The Latin words in the Vulgate used to translate this Greek noun are cibus, esca, and victus, all of which mean nothing more than "food", or "nourishment" -- which is the clear meaning of the Greek term in this and all other Matthean passages where it is used. If "maintainance" in English can include things like a staff and sandals, then it is semantically too broad to serve as an accurate translation of TROFH, and should not be used in this discussion. What you would really like to say is that the entire phrase ("the labor is worthy of his food") is a late addition by Matthew to an earlier text of Mark which lacked these words. The only problem with that is of course the fact that these are the only words of the missionary discourse for which we have independent confirmation that goes back to the mid-50's (1 Cor 9:14). Paul here knows (from an already existing tradition, and perhaps from an already existing copy of Matthew?) of an ordinance given by "the Lord" with the provision that those who preach the gospel should live by the gospel.

      As I read Mark's text it is clear to me that he is trying to race through the essentials of the lengthy text of Matt 10, just as he skipped over the sermon on the mount (to excerpt from it briefly in 11:25) and will condense the parable chapter of Matthew as well (all the while giving indications, as he does in Mk 4:2,13 and 33-34, that he is excerpting from a larger mass of material). All of Matthew's lengthy discourses pose a challenge for Mark, who wishes to create a fast-moving gospel drama to be read all at a single reading. He deals with each of these discourses in a somewhat different fashion, but always managing to significantly reduce the material, which is already well known to his community.

      Leonard Maluf
      Blessed John XXIII National Seminary
      Weston, MA
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