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[Synoptic-L] revised page for Web Link to Harris Chapter 7

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  • Jeffrey B. Gibson
    With apologies for cross posting. Here s my first draft of the revision to the Web Links page for Chapter 7, Gospels: Form and Purpose, in Harris s Into.
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 2, 2005
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      With apologies for cross posting.

      Here's my first draft of the revision to the Web Links page for Chapter
      7, "Gospels: Form and Purpose," in Harris's Into.

      Comments, corrections, and suggestions are most welcome.

      Jeffrey

      ***********
      Chapter 7. The Gospels: Form and Purpose

      Web Links

      Gospel and Gospels
      http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06655b.htm
      An older but still useful and detailed analysis by Francis E. Gigot of
      meaning of the term "Gospel" and how it came to be identified with a
      literary form, with a discussion of the differences between the
      canonical and the apocryphal Gospels. From the online version of the
      Catholic Encyclopedia.

      Gospel
      http://cf.blueletterbible.org/isbe/isbe.cfm?id=3895
      Brief discussion by David H. Bauslin, reflecting a conservative
      Protestant view, of the meaning of the term which came to designate a
      genre of early Christian writing. From the The International Standard
      Bible Encyclopaedia edited by James Orr (Eerdmans, 1918), available
      online at the Blue Letter Bible Web site.

      Gospels, the Synoptic
      http://cf.blueletterbible.org/isbe/isbe.cfm?id=3899
      The 1918 International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia's article by James
      Iverach that focuses on the relations and general features of the first
      3 Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke). With a discussion of the question of
      the Gospel's historicity. From the Blue Letter Bible Web site.

      The Gospels
      http://www.katapi.org.uk/HistNTIntro-Grant/Ch7.htm
      Robert M. Grant's discussion of the literary character of the canonical
      Gospels. Chapter 7 of his A Historical Introduction to the New
      Testament (Collins, 1963), available online at the Katapi Bible
      Resource Pages Web Site.

      Meaning of the term gospel
      http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?tocId=73427
      The discussion of the meaning of the term Gospel from the online
      Encyclopedia Britanica's article on Biblical Literature.

      The Literary Genre of the Gospels
      http://www.anova.org/sev/es/intro_gospels.htm
      A brief but incisive answer to the question of the type of literature
      the Gospels are that is set against a comparison of their distinctive
      features with those of the Greco Roman ‘bioi". From the article
      entitled "The Introduction to the Gospels" in New Oxford Annotated
      Bible with the Apocrypha: New Revised Standard Version. Ed. Michael D.
      Coogan.

      Midrash and the Gospels
      http://cloudsmagazine.com/12/Philip_S_Alexander_Midrash_and_the_Gospels.htm

      An analysis by Philip S. Alexander (Professor of Professor of
      Post-Biblical Jewish Literature in the Department of Near Eastern
      Studies , The University of Manchester , England) of the meaning of the
      term, and the characteristics of literary category, Midrash undertaken
      to determine how much, if at all, the Gospels are Midrashic in nature.

      What Are the Gospels?
      http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/religion/story/gospels.html

      A response from I. Michael White, Paula Fredriksen, Harold Attridge and
      other contemporary New Testament scholars to the question of the type of
      literary works the Gospels are. From the PBS Series From Jesus to
      Christ Web Site.

      What Are the Gospels?
      http://www.beliefnet.com/story/34/story_3423_1.html
      A Discussion of the Gospel Genre by Ben Witherington III, professor of
      New Testament Interpretation at Asbury Seminary in Kentucky published on
      the Beliefnet Web Site.

      Synoptics
      http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14389b.htm
      The article from the Catholic Encyclopedia by Francis E. Gigot
      (transcribed by Douglas J. Potter) outlining the various similarities
      and differences in form, content, and language between and among the
      Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, which advocates an older, but not
      entirely abandoned, view of Matthean Gospel priority and the
      "Augustinian" solution to the Synoptic Problem.

      Form Criticism
      http://www.katapi.org.uk/NTIntro/FormCrit.htm
      A.H. McNeile and C.S. William's discussion of the work of the Form
      Historians, from Schmidt, Bultmann, and Dibelius to Grant and Taylor, to
      isolate and classify the pre-literary forms of the Gospel tradition and
      to set them in the context of the life of the Church. From Chapter 3 of
      their An Introduction to the Study of the New Testament available online
      at the katapi bible resource pages.

      Form Criticsim
      http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?tocId=73428
      The Online Encyclopedia Britannica's discussion of the literary critical
      approach to the Gospels that deals with detecting, analyzing, and
      classifying the pre-literary "forms" of the tradition used by the
      evangelists.

      The Synoptic Problem
      http://www.katapi.org.uk/NTIntro/SynopProblem.htm
      A.H. McNeile and C.S. William's outline of the literary relationships
      between and among the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke, with their
      discussion of the ways that this has been explained. Older but detailed
      defense of the "Two Document Hypothesis". This is Chapter 4 of their An
      Introduction to the Study of the New Testament available online at the
      katapi bible resource pages.

      The Synoptic problem
      http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?tocId=73430
      The article from the online Encyclopedia Britannica that outlines the
      early history of the attempts to account for the extensive parallels in
      structure, content, and wording of Matthew, Mark, and Luke and discusses
      the principle modern views of how those parallels are to be explained.

      The Synoptic Problem Home Page
      http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/
      The Synoptic Problem Home Page A comprehensive and quite scholarly
      survey of all dimensions of the Synoptic Problem. Includes diagrams of
      all of the leading solutions to the problem suggested by scholars over
      the years. Also includes external testimony concerning the authorship of
      the Synoptics from ancient church fathers and a very comprehensive
      bibliography.

      The Synoptic Gospels Primer
      http://religion.rutgers.edu/nt/primer/
      Maintained by Mahlon Smith of Rutgers University, this Web site is
      designed for college students who are studying the synoptic problem for
      the first time. It contains many of the same features as the Synoptic
      Problem Home Page, but, it does not provide the original Greek for the
      source materials it quotes as the above site does.

      The Two Gospel Hypothesis
      http://www.colby.edu/rel/2gh/
      A Web site maintained by a team of scholars devoted to the Two Gospel
      Hypothesis formerly known as the Griesbach Hypothesis. Includes an
      analysis of the synoptic gospels in the original Greek in a manner
      illustrating the hypothesis. Also includes numerous articles by William
      Farmer, one of the foremost proponents of the Griesbach Hypothesis.

      Mark Without Q: A Synoptic Problem Web site
      http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/q/
      This site, maintained by Mark Goodacre, presents the intriguing thesis,
      known as the Farrer Theory, that Q is an unnecessary element in
      understanding Synoptic Gospel relationships.

      The Search for the No-Frills Jesus
      http://www.theatlantic.com//issues/96dec/jesus/jesus.htm
      This article from Atlantic Monthly is an informed yet detailed summary
      of the Synoptic Problem and how it continues to fuel contemporary
      scholarly debate about who Jesus was.
      --
      Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon)
      1500 W. Pratt Blvd.
      Chicago, Illinois
      e-mail jgibson000@...



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