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re: emergent nuclear weapons moratorium

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  • coyote_starship
    I ve been revisiting Critical Path. When living in DC, I put quite a bit of time into trying to verify some of the content, as noted in my journal. Large
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 3, 2010
      I've been revisiting Critical Path. When living in DC, I put
      quite a bit of time into trying to verify some of the content,
      as noted in my journal.

      Large numbers of people get their livelihood from ship building
      and the world navies don't want to lose the knowledge of how
      to construct and operate such machinery. Many people are wanting
      to get into that business, which includes learning about nuclear
      power and of course nuclear weapons.

      A ban on installing new nuclear weapons on subs might be popular
      with civilians, often the targets of said weapons in war planning.
      The spending is also lethal. The world navies a continuing to
      place a load on all sectors in order to provide these work / study
      opportunities. The benefits to our "global university" should
      be accounted in net return in the form of life support (wealth).

      Wikipedia now has an entry devoted to submarine aircraft carriers,
      which have been tried in several forms. Fuller is never cited as
      no verifying information has ever corroborated his Critical Path
      assertion that large VTOL-carrying subs had secretly wended their
      way into the world fleet, without the knowledge of either Congress
      or Jane's. These are still science fiction and futuristic as far
      as Cyberia is concerned.

      Dire conditions in Africa have motivated high risk quasi-suicidal
      "pirates" to attack shipping lanes as far away as the Indian Ocean,
      in hopes of holding a freighter and its crew hostage for ransom.
      Addressing the humanitarian needs of the region, creating more life
      support, would be an alternative to enlisting the world navy, in
      this case surface ships with no need of nuclear weapons. The navy
      appreciates having a clear mission in this case (to protect shipping
      lanes) but the drama is so one-sided and the actions of the pirates
      so desperate as to motivate faculty to search for better scripts with
      better outcomes. A university that can afford nuclear subs should
      be able to alleviate living conditions along coastal Africa, where
      over-fishing has contributed to students' desperation.

      The number of nuclear weapons already deployed on submarines is
      sufficient to completely devastate the university's infrastructure
      and wreak opportunities for productive livelihoods for the world's
      billions. The proliferation of ballistic missiles to these vessels
      is hardly what the doctors ordered, in terms of hoping to provide
      ameliorative care to a student body in dire straits, striving to
      pass "final exams" i.e. nature's tests of our continued viability.
      We've seen new opportunities come our way, for shelter, for energy
      harvesting. If humanity chooses to exercise its option to succeed,
      than we would need to take greater advantage of these opportunities.

      The idea that which curriculum we follow doesn't matter holds no
      water of course. The syllabus (or syllabi) we use makes a big
      difference. In this day and age, "readings" have been greatly
      augmented by "viewings" e.g. television programs. What goes out
      over television is literally a kind of programming of our shared
      neuro-anatomy, as it shapes our expectations and conditioned
      reflexes. Our shared intuitions, a manifestation of the Zeitgeist
      or Noosphere, now become manifest in Cyberia (2nd world, cyberspace),
      creating a collective consciousness where we used to have more of
      a collective unconscious. The psyche of humanity has been
      transformed by a world-embracing telecommunications infrastructure.

      Back to the moratorium idea: the criminalization of nuclear weapons
      of all description has become a mainstream idea, with an august list
      of diplomats, senators, faculty at all levels lending their support.
      The problem of their decommissioning and disposal is already
      sufficiently challenging to keep humans gainfully occupied for
      centuries to come. The karma of unstable elements with toxic effects
      and long half lives is already plenty devastating, even without
      further self-damaging and psychopathic nuclear warfare. Rendering
      nuclear power a safer option, if its to be used at all, is likewise
      a worthy focus.

      Turning world submarines into university assets of greater value
      will require redesigning the curriculum to make these work / study
      opportunities less about nationalist fantasies of world domination,
      and more about actual self mastery at the level of personal skills
      and abilities. Living on a submarine is not necessarily easy,
      takes practice and training. These skills are transferable to
      close quarters living in other marine environments, such as
      underwater research stations, as well as to the environment of
      extraterrestrial space. Those who certify on a submarine are more
      likely candidates for space station duties, or even moon base duties
      should we deploy students and faculty to the lunar campus.

      In other words, converting submarines to civilian service, without
      cutting ties to memory banks, without suppressing military lore,
      would be consistent with a nuclear weaponry ban. The corresponding
      programming would need to acknowledge the newly integrated nature
      of the naval fleets, in the sense that desovereignization is the
      new psychic reality, thanks to "Cyberia" (the collective
      consciousness). Serving on a submarine with a clear sense of purpose
      and mission will make a lot more existential sense to the crews.
      Creating life support (wealth) for world humans is a worthy exercise,
      whereas simply living the dream of the past, indulging in fantasies
      of nations at war, is both dangerous (such prophesies may be
      self-fulfilling) and draining (mentally, and resource-wise).
    • Dick Fischbeck
      http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/04/01/the_little_nukes_that_got_away
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 3, 2010
        http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/04/01/the_little_nukes_that_got_away

        > Back to the moratorium idea: the criminalization of nuclear weapons
        > of all description has become a mainstream idea, with an august list
        > of diplomats, senators, faculty at all levels lending their support.
        > The problem of their decommissioning and disposal is already
        > sufficiently challenging to keep humans gainfully occupied for
        > centuries to come.

        > K Urner
      • Dick Fischbeck
        http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/25/world/europe/25start.html
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 3, 2010
        • Dick Fischbeck
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MGR-1_Honest_John
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 3, 2010
          • coyote_starship
            ... Yes excellent. This kind of information deserves a lot more focus. People spontaneously want to collaborate on solving these problems and help one another
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 3, 2010
              --- In synergeo@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Fischbeck" <dick_fischbeck@...> wrote:
              >
              > http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/04/01/the_little_nukes_that_got_away
              >

              Yes excellent.

              This kind of information deserves a lot more focus. People
              spontaneously want to collaborate on solving these problems
              and help one another without regard for "sovereignty" (the
              reigning king). It's kind of a do or die situation and those
              wishing to improve the security situation are working on
              improving the trust and verification protocols needed to
              get these weapons out of circulation.

              It's worthwhile to celebrate gains that have already been made.

              Freeman Dyson was going over some of that history when in
              Portland recently. Humans do have the capacity to self-organize
              around catalyzing leadership plus the Global U's new telecomm
              infrastructure has the potential to shorten the time lag between
              the dream and the reality.

              This is why today's warfaring is considered psychological and/or
              cybernetic first and foremost i.e. there's contention among world
              views (ontologies) and which get to most manifest.

              Do we want our university to spend billions on new weapons of mass
              self-destruction, or student housing and food services?

              The so-called "math wars" are a case in point. One gets to the
              "front line" simply by urging more spatial geometry in K-12,
              some new nomenclature, some exploration with tetrahedral accounting.

              The Greek root "cyber" means "to steer" as you probably know.

              A moratorium on proliferation of any kind makes it easier for
              whistle blowers to report a violation whenever they see one.

              Kirby

              > > Back to the moratorium idea: the criminalization of nuclear weapons
              > > of all description has become a mainstream idea, with an august list
              > > of diplomats, senators, faculty at all levels lending their support.
              > > The problem of their decommissioning and disposal is already
              > > sufficiently challenging to keep humans gainfully occupied for
              > > centuries to come.
              >
              > > K Urner
              >
            • coyote_starship
              ... Killingry vs. Livingry. The belief in a lethal inadequacy of life support continues to generate self-fulfilling prophecies. Positive futurism needs to
              Message 6 of 15 , Apr 3, 2010
                --- In synergeo@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Fischbeck" <dick_fischbeck@...> wrote:
                >
                > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MGR-1_Honest_John
                >

                Killingry vs. Livingry.

                The belief in a lethal inadequacy of life support continues to
                generate self-fulfilling prophecies.

                Positive futurism needs to include some mega-projects that
                actually get off the drawing boards. Old Man River City for example.

                Consider the work / study opportunities.

                I was applying this same "Global U" model to railroad projects
                recently:

                http://worldgame.blogspot.com/2010/03/work-study-programs.html

                Kirby
              • Dick Fischbeck
                Born on a mountain top in Tennessee... Thanks for the link, Alan. Reminds me of the Burl Ives records growing up. 18. Ballad Of Davy Crockett
                Message 7 of 15 , Apr 3, 2010
                  "Born on a mountain top in Tennessee..."

                  Thanks for the link, Alan. Reminds me of the Burl Ives records growing up.

                  18. Ballad Of Davy Crockett

                  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Little-Bitty-Tear-Best/dp/B000024SYD

                  <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davy_Crockett_(nuclear_device)>

                  > > http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/04/01/the_little_nukes_that_got_away
                  > >
                  >
                  > Yes excellent.
                • Dick Fischbeck
                  I leave this rule for others when I m dead Be always sure you re right †THEN GO AHEAD!
                  Message 8 of 15 , Apr 3, 2010
                    "I leave this rule for others when I'm dead
                    Be always sure you're right â€" THEN GO AHEAD!"


                    > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davy_Crockett_(nuclear_device)>
                    >
                    > > > http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/04/01/the_little_nukes_that_got_away
                  • coyote_starship
                    ... Here s a journal entry about that time period: http://mybizmo.blogspot.com/2006/07/making-waves-in-dc.html ... Here s a story about proliferating nuclear
                    Message 9 of 15 , Apr 3, 2010
                      --- In synergeo@yahoogroups.com, "coyote_starship" <kirby.urner@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > I've been revisiting Critical Path. When living in DC, I put
                      > quite a bit of time into trying to verify some of the content,
                      > as noted in my journal.
                      >

                      Here's a journal entry about that time period:

                      http://mybizmo.blogspot.com/2006/07/making-waves-in-dc.html

                      > Large numbers of people get their livelihood from ship building
                      > and the world navies don't want to lose the knowledge of how
                      > to construct and operate such machinery. Many people are wanting
                      > to get into that business, which includes learning about nuclear
                      > power and of course nuclear weapons.
                      >

                      Here's a story about proliferating nuclear weapons via subs:

                      http://rusnavy.com/news/othernavies/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=8938

                      > A ban on installing new nuclear weapons on subs might be popular
                      > with civilians, often the targets of said weapons in war planning.
                      > The spending is also lethal. The world navies a continuing to
                      > place a load on all sectors in order to provide these work / study
                      > opportunities. The benefits to our "global university" should
                      > be accounted in net return in the form of life support (wealth).
                      >
                      > Wikipedia now has an entry devoted to submarine aircraft carriers,
                      > which have been tried in several forms. Fuller is never cited as
                      > no verifying information has ever corroborated his Critical Path
                      > assertion that large VTOL-carrying subs had secretly wended their
                      > way into the world fleet, without the knowledge of either Congress
                      > or Jane's. These are still science fiction and futuristic as far
                      > as Cyberia is concerned.
                      >
                      > Dire conditions in Africa have motivated high risk quasi-suicidal
                      > "pirates" to attack shipping lanes as far away as the Indian Ocean,
                      > in hopes of holding a freighter and its crew hostage for ransom.
                      > Addressing the humanitarian needs of the region, creating more life
                      > support, would be an alternative to enlisting the world navy, in
                      > this case surface ships with no need of nuclear weapons. The navy
                      > appreciates having a clear mission in this case (to protect shipping
                      > lanes) but the drama is so one-sided and the actions of the pirates
                      > so desperate as to motivate faculty to search for better scripts with
                      > better outcomes. A university that can afford nuclear subs should
                      > be able to alleviate living conditions along coastal Africa, where
                      > over-fishing has contributed to students' desperation.
                      >

                      An article on piracy:

                      http://rusnavy.com/nowadays/tasks/piracy/piracy_profitable.htm

                      There "pirates" have run out of other options. More work / study
                      programming needed.

                      Per GST, the Global U is an open system, powered by the sun which
                      in turn powers biomass, a set of living systems capable of
                      exponential rates of change.

                      An economic accounting system which creates debt any time an asset
                      is created is failing to credit the sun and all the consequent
                      biomass machinery upon which humans depend.

                      This is not a zero-sum closed system that we're living on.

                      On the other hand, not every resource is growing.

                      Doing more with less, recycling, efficiency, frugality -- these are
                      ancient values. Waste is ugly. Lifestyles that involve lots of
                      waste and squandering are not enticing, do not connote "higher living
                      standards".

                      Higher living standards goes hand in hand with raising academic
                      standards, which means increasing student satisfaction with the
                      work / study programs in which they get to enroll.

                      Satisfaction increases because it's clear how these programs are
                      creating life support, solving problems. Time for study and
                      reflection is built in. Intuitive access to inner leadings,
                      self-directed learning, is an integral aspect of being human.
                      Spontaneous self-organization arises when people give themselves
                      permission to practice mindfulness.

                      Humans with no time to reflect react on the basis of reflex
                      conditioning, past habits and strategies. Sometimes this works out,
                      but higher living standards means having time to ponder and to
                      plan, both alone and with peers.

                      > The number of nuclear weapons already deployed on submarines is
                      > sufficient to completely devastate the university's infrastructure
                      > and wreak opportunities for productive livelihoods for the world's

                      "wreck opportunities" -- must've been thinking of "wreaking havoc".

                      > billions. The proliferation of ballistic missiles to these vessels
                      > is hardly what the doctors ordered, in terms of hoping to provide
                      > ameliorative care to a student body in dire straits, striving to
                      > pass "final exams" i.e. nature's tests of our continued viability.
                      > We've seen new opportunities come our way, for shelter, for energy
                      > harvesting. If humanity chooses to exercise its option to succeed,
                      > than we would need to take greater advantage of these opportunities.
                      >

                      News We Could Use:

                      http://controlroom.blogspot.com/2010/02/news-we-could-use.html

                      > The idea that which curriculum we follow doesn't matter holds no
                      > water of course.

                      ... a convoluted double negative.

                      > The syllabus (or syllabi) we use makes a big
                      > difference. In this day and age, "readings" have been greatly
                      > augmented by "viewings" e.g. television programs. What goes out
                      > over television is literally a kind of programming of our shared
                      > neuro-anatomy, as it shapes our expectations and conditioned
                      > reflexes. Our shared intuitions, a manifestation of the Zeitgeist
                      > or Noosphere, now become manifest in Cyberia (2nd world, cyberspace),
                      > creating a collective consciousness where we used to have more of
                      > a collective unconscious. The psyche of humanity has been
                      > transformed by a world-embracing telecommunications infrastructure.
                      >

                      "We all feel it now".

                      > Back to the moratorium idea: the criminalization of nuclear weapons
                      > of all description has become a mainstream idea, with an august list
                      > of diplomats, senators, faculty at all levels lending their support.
                      > The problem of their decommissioning and disposal is already
                      > sufficiently challenging to keep humans gainfully occupied for
                      > centuries to come. The karma of unstable elements with toxic effects
                      > and long half lives is already plenty devastating, even without
                      > further self-damaging and psychopathic nuclear warfare. Rendering
                      > nuclear power a safer option, if its to be used at all, is likewise
                      > a worthy focus.
                      >

                      """
                      Actions by national governments and legislatures to prohibit and criminalize nuclear weapons would strengthen the global norm of illegality of these weapons. This would be true particularly if States included extra-territoriality (i.e. where it would be a crime for citizens of the country, including public officials, to engage in nuclear weapons activities regardless of where in the world they undertake such activities) and universality (i.e. where the State exercises jurisdiction over such activities regardless of where in the world the crime was committed and regardless of the citizenship of the perpetrator). [8]
                      """
                      http://www.gsinstitute.org/pnnd/AlynWareGlobalCoordinatoratOPENAL.htm
                      http://www.lcnp.org/disarmament/Ju-Jitsu_UNSC1540.htm

                      But do we have time for the slow grinding of State wheels?

                      Defacto: these weapons are criminal. Those working to improve
                      global security by augmenting life support need to assume this
                      point of view. This becomes a military responsibility, not only
                      a civilian one. The Global U cannot afford to be squandering
                      resources on self-destructive WMSs (weapons of mass suicide).

                      > Turning world submarines into university assets of greater value
                      > will require redesigning the curriculum to make these work / study
                      > opportunities less about nationalist fantasies of world domination,
                      > and more about actual self mastery at the level of personal skills
                      > and abilities. Living on a submarine is not necessarily easy,
                      > takes practice and training. These skills are transferable to
                      > close quarters living in other marine environments, such as
                      > underwater research stations, as well as to the environment of
                      > extraterrestrial space. Those who certify on a submarine are more
                      > likely candidates for space station duties, or even moon base duties
                      > should we deploy students and faculty to the lunar campus.
                      >

                      We could have co-ed and separated by gender. Women-only subs,
                      why not?

                      > In other words, converting submarines to civilian service, without
                      > cutting ties to memory banks, without suppressing military lore,
                      > would be consistent with a nuclear weaponry ban. The corresponding
                      > programming would need to acknowledge the newly integrated nature
                      > of the naval fleets, in the sense that desovereignization is the
                      > new psychic reality, thanks to "Cyberia" (the collective
                      > consciousness). Serving on a submarine with a clear sense of purpose
                      > and mission will make a lot more existential sense to the crews.
                      > Creating life support (wealth) for world humans is a worthy exercise,
                      > whereas simply living the dream of the past, indulging in fantasies
                      > of nations at war, is both dangerous (such prophesies may be
                      > self-fulfilling) and draining (mentally, and resource-wise).
                      >
                    • Dick Fischbeck
                      Humans first need: (single answer please) Shelter, water, food for all? (maybe that s 3 answers)
                      Message 10 of 15 , Apr 4, 2010
                        Humans first need:

                        (single answer please)

                        Shelter, water, food for all? (maybe that's 3 answers)
                      • coyote_starship
                        ... Humans also provide, don t just need. They need to provide in order to be able to develop better ways of meeting their needs, a cybernetic circle eh?
                        Message 11 of 15 , Apr 4, 2010
                          --- In synergeo@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Fischbeck" <dick_fischbeck@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Humans first need:
                          >
                          > (single answer please)
                          >
                          > Shelter, water, food for all? (maybe that's 3 answers)
                          >

                          Humans also provide, don't just need. They need to
                          provide in order to be able to develop better ways
                          of meeting their needs, a cybernetic circle eh?

                          Kirby
                        • Alan M
                          ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cybernetic#Overview The term cybernetics stems from the Greek (kybernetes, steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder — the same
                          Message 12 of 15 , Apr 4, 2010
                            --- In synergeo@yahoogroups.com, "coyote_starship" wrote:
                            >
                            > --- In synergeo@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Fischbeck" wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Humans first need:
                            > >
                            > > (single answer please)
                            > >
                            > > Shelter, water, food for all? (maybe that's 3 answers)
                            > >
                            >
                            > Humans also provide, don't just need. They need to
                            > provide in order to be able to develop better ways
                            > of meeting their needs, a cybernetic circle eh?

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cybernetic#Overview
                            "The term cybernetics stems from the Greek (kybernetes, steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder — the same root as government)."
                            Does that mean Trim-Tab?

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Control_theory
                            "Control theory is an interdisciplinary branch of engineering and mathematics, that deals with the behavior of dynamical systems."
                            I believe that I took an engineering course in "Control Systems" in college once.
                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Control_systems

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systems_theory
                            "Systems theory is an interdisciplinary theory about the nature of complex systems in nature, society, and science, and is a framework by which one can investigate and/or describe any group of objects that work together to produce some result."
                            Is that Synergetics?
                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synergetics
                          • Dick Fischbeck
                            They do a billion things but what comes first...
                            Message 13 of 15 , Apr 5, 2010
                              They do a billion things but what comes first...


                              > > Humans first need:
                              > >
                              > > (single answer please)
                              > >
                              > > Shelter, water, food for all? (maybe that's 3 answers)
                              > >
                              >
                              > Humans also provide, don't just need. They need to
                              > provide in order to be able to develop better ways
                              > of meeting their needs, a cybernetic circle eh?
                              >
                              > Kirby
                              >
                            • John Brawley
                              ......stuffing people into self-contained multiple housing packages, no matter how beautiful or efficient, is no answer. People need open space, free
                              Message 14 of 15 , Apr 6, 2010
                                ......stuffing people into self-contained multiple housing packages, no
                                matter how beautiful or efficient, is no answer. People need open space,
                                free movement, and the surface of the planet upon which to live.
                                "Arkologies" are fine fun science-fiction dreamings, nothing more.

                                --just opinion, of course, since I personally would not want to live in one.
                                I vastly prefer the wild, the ever-was-and-will-be, the real, which is why I
                                live as far from the city's hard canyons as makes sense to.

                                JBw

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: "coyote_starship" <kirby.urner@...>
                                To: <synergeo@yahoogroups.com>
                                Sent: Saturday, April 03, 2010 2:17 PM
                                Subject: [synergeo] Re: emergent nuclear weapons moratorium


                                > --- In synergeo@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Fischbeck" <dick_fischbeck@...>
                                > wrote:
                                >>
                                >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MGR-1_Honest_John
                                >>
                                >
                                > Killingry vs. Livingry.
                                >
                                > The belief in a lethal inadequacy of life support continues to
                                > generate self-fulfilling prophecies.
                                >
                                > Positive futurism needs to include some mega-projects that
                                > actually get off the drawing boards. Old Man River City for example.
                                >
                                > Consider the work / study opportunities.
                                >
                                > I was applying this same "Global U" model to railroad projects
                                > recently:
                                >
                                > http://worldgame.blogspot.com/2010/03/work-study-programs.html
                                >
                                > Kirby
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > ------------------------------------
                                >
                                > To post a message, send plain text only to: synergeo@yahoogroups.com, to
                                > send a message to the list owners send to synergeo-owner@yahoogroups.com.
                                > Patent searches at http://www.google.com/patents
                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >
                                >
                                >
                              • Alan M
                                http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets/episodes/japanese-supersub-preview-this-episode/546/
                                Message 15 of 15 , May 5, 2010
                                  http://www.pbs.org/wnet/secrets/episodes/japanese-supersub-preview-this-episode/546/

                                  --- In synergeo@yahoogroups.com, "coyote_starship" <Kirby.urner@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Wikipedia now has an entry devoted to submarine aircraft carriers,
                                  > which have been tried in several forms. Fuller is never cited as
                                  > no verifying information has ever corroborated his Critical Path
                                  > assertion that large VTOL-carrying subs had secretly wended their
                                  > way into the world fleet, without the knowledge of either Congress
                                  > or Jane's. These are still science fiction and futuristic as far
                                  > as Cyberia is concerned.
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