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Re: [syndication] Digest Number 262

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  • Pino Calzo
    Hello julian, syc should then be used to cite the source that the item was syc developed from. syc syc eg. I write a story which is a comment
    Message 1 of 4 , May 6, 2001
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      Hello julian,

      syc> <source> should then be used to cite the source that the item was
      syc> developed from.
      syc>
      syc> eg. I write a story which is a comment about a Wired article. <link>
      syc> should point at my story, <source> should point at the Wired article.
      syc>
      syc> Going down this route suggests that each <item> should be allowed to
      syc> have multiple <source> with one for each link in the page at <link>


      this brings me to the issue how to code "wired". There doesnt seem to
      be an international standard which uniquely identifies the Wired
      Magazine (and all the private weblogs out there, which can be a
      source,too). Problem with simple text coding are obvious: A site like
      NewsIsFree, parses the newsfeed and creates links. How can the
      software now know that Wired, Wired Magazine (and whatever synonym
      there may be) is the same.

      In the B2B-World there is the same issue with international catalog
      coding. They have been looking for a way to give every supplier an
      unique ID. They came up with the Dun&Bradstreet (DUNS) Number, which
      every company gets with registration. That way everybody knows, that
      1541212 equals "Staples" (example, not real life number).

      --
      Best regards,
      Pino mailto:pino@...
    • Mark Nottingham
      The obvious answer is a URI of some sort; it s just a matter of choosing the sort. There are URN schemes for ISBN and DUNS, IIRC. Or, use a normalized form of
      Message 2 of 4 , May 6, 2001
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        The obvious answer is a URI of some sort; it's just a matter of
        choosing the sort. There are URN schemes for ISBN and DUNS, IIRC. Or,
        use a normalized form of the site's domain name (HTTP URL, or just
        domain name; it's a registry, after all).

        Cheers,



        On Sun, May 06, 2001 at 10:31:05AM +0200, Pino Calzo wrote:
        > Hello julian,
        >
        > syc> <source> should then be used to cite the source that the item was
        > syc> developed from.
        > syc>
        > syc> eg. I write a story which is a comment about a Wired article. <link>
        > syc> should point at my story, <source> should point at the Wired article.
        > syc>
        > syc> Going down this route suggests that each <item> should be allowed to
        > syc> have multiple <source> with one for each link in the page at <link>
        >
        >
        > this brings me to the issue how to code "wired". There doesnt seem to
        > be an international standard which uniquely identifies the Wired
        > Magazine (and all the private weblogs out there, which can be a
        > source,too). Problem with simple text coding are obvious: A site like
        > NewsIsFree, parses the newsfeed and creates links. How can the
        > software now know that Wired, Wired Magazine (and whatever synonym
        > there may be) is the same.
        >
        > In the B2B-World there is the same issue with international catalog
        > coding. They have been looking for a way to give every supplier an
        > unique ID. They came up with the Dun&Bradstreet (DUNS) Number, which
        > every company gets with registration. That way everybody knows, that
        > 1541212 equals "Staples" (example, not real life number).
        >
        > --
        > Best regards,
        > Pino mailto:pino@...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >

        --
        Mark Nottingham
        http://www.mnot.net/
      • Dan Lyke
        ... What s wrong with an ISSN? ... Just FYI, I believe that Wired.com and Wired magazine are distinctly _not_ the same. Dan
        Message 3 of 4 , May 6, 2001
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          Pino Calzo writes:
          > this brings me to the issue how to code "wired". There doesnt seem to
          > be an international standard which uniquely identifies the Wired
          > Magazine (and all the private weblogs out there, which can be a
          > source,too).

          What's wrong with an ISSN?

          > How can the software now know that Wired, Wired Magazine (and
          > whatever synonym there may be) is the same.

          Just FYI, I believe that Wired.com and Wired magazine are distinctly
          _not_ the same.

          Dan
        • Julian Bond
          In article , Pino Calzo writes ... My immediate thought here is to ask why you want to be able to
          Message 4 of 4 , May 6, 2001
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            In article <2995021553.20010506103105@...>, Pino Calzo
            <pino@...> writes
            >this brings me to the issue how to code "wired". There doesnt seem to
            >be an international standard which uniquely identifies the Wired
            >Magazine (and all the private weblogs out there, which can be a
            >source,too). Problem with simple text coding are obvious: A site like
            >NewsIsFree, parses the newsfeed and creates links. How can the
            >software now know that Wired, Wired Magazine (and whatever synonym
            >there may be) is the same.

            My immediate thought here is to ask why you want to be able to reference
            a specific source over time. This is the only reason I can see for
            wanting to define a unique ID.

            I don't like the idea of an "international standard for IDs" because
            it's very hard to do it in an open and extendible way. For our purposes,
            I think that a Domain name or perhaps the <channel>.<link> value is
            sufficiently accurate for any reference you're likely to want.

            >In the B2B-World there is the same issue with international catalog
            >coding. They have been looking for a way to give every supplier an
            >unique ID. They came up with the Dun&Bradstreet (DUNS) Number, which
            >every company gets with registration. That way everybody knows, that
            >1541212 equals "Staples" (example, not real life number).

            In my B2B life we ended up doing the same thing, using DUNS. It works
            fine in the US, poorly in Europe and is less than useless in SE Asia.

            --
            Julian Bond eMail: julian@...
            HomeURL: http://www.shockwav.demon.co.uk/
            WorkURL: http://www.netmarketseurope.com/
            WebLog: http://roguemoon.manilasites.com/
            M: +44 (0)77 5907 2173 T: +44 (0)20 7420 4363
            ICQ:33679668 tag:So many words, so little time
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