Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [swflpc] Cool weather paddling clothes and stuff...

Expand Messages
  • Carey Parks
    What Pat said! - because being cold is not just a comfort issue, it s a safety issue. Your muscles don t work as well when they are chilled and they don t work
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 7, 2010
      What Pat said! - because being cold is not just a comfort issue, it's a safety issue. Your muscles don't work as well when they are chilled and they don't work at all when they are cold. Think of a stick of butter, the colder the stiffer. Your muscles contain a lot of similar fat.

      Want to keep your hands warm? Heat your core. The Army (US or Canada I don't remember which) was researching ways to keep mechanics hands warm in the arctic when they had to work on vehicles and the fine work wouldn't permit heavy gloves. They found that if they over-heated the soldier's core with a heat producing vest, the body would try and cool itself and send the blood to the extremities to cool it off. So they got a nice supply of warm blood in their hands. The reverse is also true. Chill your core and circulation in your hands and feet and then arms and legs is reduced to keep your core warm. 

      The older you get, the worse your circulation to your hands, the worse the effect. 

      Hypothermia can be a slow process you don't realize is happening to you. I once became hypothermic wearing shorts and a T-shirt riding in my father's van on a long trip. He had long pants and socks on, and perhaps had some sun coming through his window. I was chilly, but not terribly so, and it was his van so I didn't say anything. After a number of hours we stopped and I tried to get out, but I couldn't stand up. I crumpled into a shivering crouch next to the van until the sun warmed me up some. Believe me, you are not master of your body if you don't keep it warm. I never would have been able to swim. (You always wear your PFD right?)

      Cheers,

      Carey

      On Sun, Nov 7, 2010 at 4:04 PM, <p8owen@...> wrote:
       


      Paddlers take precautions to keep yourself warm while paddling this winter in Florida.  HYPOTHERMIA CAN HAPPEN TO ANY PADDLER IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA.  Even when the day starts out sunny the the weather could change before your trip ends and you want to be prepared to add layers on the trip back. 

      Most important-- keep your core warm at all times.  Your pfd can help insulate you.  Put away your cotton paddling clothes, wear synthetics (quick dry fabrics), carry extra clothes to put on in case you get cold.   When it's cold here it's usually because it's windy so always carry a windproof jacket.  Wear fleece, neoprene, capilene, polypro, etc (synthetic) tops.  Wear tights, fleece, synthetic bottoms, if you've got em bring your waterproof/windproof pants just in case.  Pack a warm hat (heat escapes through your head), socks (smartwool/neoprene/waterproof), gloves/poggies in case you need them.

      Why no cotton clothing in winter?  Wet cotton provides absolutely no insulation.  Wet fleece or wet neoprene provides some insulation especially under a jacket.

      In cold windy weather I wear a fleece top or neoprene top with waterproof/windproof jacket, fleece or neoprene pants.  Sometimes wear socks with my paddling shoes (you can feel cool water temp through the bottom of your kayak).  I carry a warm hat (not cotton) and poggies (look them up).  I carry an extra set of dry paddling clothes in a waterproof bag and an emergency shelter bag.

      Make sure your paddling companions are dressed appropriately and carry extra clothes before you set out.

      Large thick black garbage bags can be used as emergency shelters so put one or two in your kayak this winter.

      You could also carry a thermos of hot non caffeinated tea.

      If I missed something let me know.

      Pat Owen
      Southwest Florida Paddling Club




      --
      http://parkswhistles.com/
      http://www.facebook.com/carey.parks
      http://twitter.com/LuthierCarey
    • JackC
      Here is a link to a very eye opening video on the effects of cold water immersion. Jack http://vimeo.com/4534662
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 7, 2010
        Here is a link to a very eye opening video on the effects of cold water immersion. Jack
        http://vimeo.com/4534662


        --- In swflpc@yahoogroups.com, Carey Parks <Carey@...> wrote:
        >
        > What Pat said! - because being cold is not just a comfort issue, it's a
        > safety issue. Your muscles don't work as well when they are chilled and they
        > don't work at all when they are cold. Think of a stick of butter, the colder
        > the stiffer. Your muscles contain a lot of similar fat.
        >
        > Want to keep your hands warm? Heat your core. The Army (US or Canada I don't
        > remember which) was researching ways to keep mechanics hands warm in the
        > arctic when they had to work on vehicles and the fine work wouldn't permit
        > heavy gloves. They found that if they over-heated the soldier's core with a
        > heat producing vest, the body would try and cool itself and send the blood
        > to the extremities to cool it off. So they got a nice supply of warm blood
        > in their hands. The reverse is also true. Chill your core and circulation in
        > your hands and feet and then arms and legs is reduced to keep your core
        > warm.
        >
        > The older you get, the worse your circulation to your hands, the worse the
        > effect.
        >
        > Hypothermia can be a slow process you don't realize is happening to you. I
        > once became hypothermic wearing shorts and a T-shirt riding in my father's
        > van on a long trip. He had long pants and socks on, and perhaps had some sun
        > coming through his window. I was chilly, but not terribly so, and it was his
        > van so I didn't say anything. After a number of hours we stopped and I tried
        > to get out, but I couldn't stand up. I crumpled into a shivering crouch next
        > to the van until the sun warmed me up some. Believe me, you are not master
        > of your body if you don't keep it warm. I never would have been able to
        > swim. (You always wear your PFD right?)
        >
        > Cheers,
        >
        > Carey
        >
        > On Sun, Nov 7, 2010 at 4:04 PM, <p8owen@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > *Paddlers take precautions to keep yourself warm while paddling this
        > > winter in Florida. HYPOTHERMIA CAN HAPPEN TO ANY PADDLER IN SOUTHWEST
        > > FLORIDA. Even when the day starts out sunny the the weather could change
        > > before your trip ends and you want to be prepared to add layers on the trip
        > > back. *
        > > *
        > > *
        > > *Most important-- keep your core warm at all times. Your pfd can help
        > > insulate you. Put away your cotton paddling clothes, wear synthetics (quick
        > > dry fabrics), carry extra clothes to put on in case you get cold. When
        > > it's cold here it's usually because it's windy so always carry a windproof
        > > jacket. Wear fleece, neoprene, capilene, polypro, etc (synthetic) tops.
        > > Wear tights, fleece, synthetic bottoms, if you've got em bring your
        > > waterproof/windproof pants just in case. Pack a warm hat (heat escapes
        > > through your head), socks (smartwool/neoprene/waterproof), gloves/poggies in
        > > case you need them.*
        > > *
        > > *
        > > *Why no cotton clothing in winter? Wet cotton provides absolutely no
        > > insulation. Wet fleece or wet neoprene provides some insulation especially
        > > under a jacket.*
        > > *
        > > *
        > > *In cold windy weather I wear a fleece top or neoprene top with
        > > waterproof/windproof jacket, fleece or neoprene pants. Sometimes wear socks
        > > with my paddling shoes (you can feel cool water temp through the bottom of
        > > your kayak). I carry a warm hat (not cotton) and poggies (look them up). I
        > > carry an extra set of dry paddling clothes in a waterproof bag and an
        > > emergency shelter bag.*
        > > *
        > > *
        > > *Make sure your paddling companions are dressed appropriately and carry
        > > extra clothes before you set out.*
        > > *
        > > *
        > > *Large thick black garbage bags can be used as emergency shelters so put
        > > one or two in your kayak this winter.*
        > > *
        > > *
        > > *You could also carry a thermos of hot non caffeinated tea.*
        > > *
        > > *
        > > *If I missed something let me know.*
        > > *
        > > *
        > > *Pat Owen*
        > > *Southwest Florida Paddling Club*
        > > *
        > > *
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > http://parkswhistles.com/
        > http://www.facebook.com/carey.parks
        > http://twitter.com/LuthierCarey
        >
      • Pat Owen
        After viewing this video I hope everyone thinks about what lies underneath your pfd, your heart, pumping warm blood to the rest of your body. If my pfd can
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 7, 2010
          After viewing this video I hope everyone thinks about what lies underneath your pfd, your heart, pumping warm blood to the rest of your body.  If my pfd can keep me floating and insulate my body so my heart can work longer, I think I'll just keep wearing it.   Priceless.  PatO

          ----- Forwarded Message ----
          From: JackC <jconrad@...>
          To: swflpc@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sun, November 7, 2010 5:09:44 PM
          Subject: [swflpc] Re: Cool weather paddling clothes and stuff...

           


          Here is a link to a very eye opening video on the effects of cold water immersion. Jack
          http://vimeo.com/4534662

        • JackC
          That PFD can also give you protection from blunt force trauma such as a large fish. Jack
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 7, 2010
            That PFD can also give you protection from blunt force trauma such as a large fish. Jack



            --- In swflpc@yahoogroups.com, Pat Owen <p8owen@...> wrote:
            >
            > After viewing this video I hope everyone thinks about what lies underneath your
            > pfd, your heart, pumping warm blood to the rest of your body. If my pfd can
            > keep me floating and insulate my body so my heart can work longer, I think I'll
            > just keep wearing it. Priceless. PatO
            >
          • drowland2006
            I know this is no joking matter, but good suggestion Ken. ... From: Ken Rose To: swflpc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, November 7,
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 7, 2010

              I know this is no joking matter, but good suggestion Ken.

               

               

               


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Ken Rose" <kenrose2@...>
              To: swflpc@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, November 7, 2010 4:12:30 PM
              Subject: RE: [swflpc] Cool weather paddling clothes and stuff...

               

              A flask of Scotch.

              Also can be used in emergency for snake bites.

               

              A snake.

               

              From: swflpc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:swflpc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of p8owen@...
              Sent: Sunday, November 07, 2010 4:04 PM
              To: swflpc@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [swflpc] Cool weather paddling clothes and stuff...

               

               

               

              Paddlers take precautions to keep yourself warm while paddling this winter in Florida.  HYPOTHERMIA CAN HAPPEN TO ANY PADDLER IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA.  Even when the day starts out sunny the the weather could change before your trip ends and you want to be prepared to add layers on the trip back. 

               

              Most important-- keep your core warm at all times.  Your pfd can help insulate you.  Put away your cotton paddling clothes, wear synthetics (quick dry fabrics), carry extra clothes to put on in case you get cold.   When it's cold here it's usually because it's windy so always carry a windproof jacket.  Wear fleece, neoprene, capilene, polypro, etc (synthetic) tops.  Wear tights, fleece, synthetic bottoms, if you've got em bring your waterproof/windproof pants just in case.  Pack a warm hat (heat escapes through your head), socks (smartwool/neoprene/waterproof), gloves/poggies in case you need them.

               

              Why no cotton clothing in winter?  Wet cotton provides absolutely no insulation.  Wet fleece or wet neoprene provides some insulation especially under a jacket.

               

              In cold windy weather I wear a fleece top or neoprene top with waterproof/windproof jacket, fleece or neoprene pants.  Sometimes wear socks with my paddling shoes (you can feel cool water temp through the bottom of your kayak).  I carry a warm hat (not cotton) and poggies (look them up).  I carry an extra set of dry paddling clothes in a waterproof bag and an emergency shelter bag.

               

              Make sure your paddling companions are dressed appropriately and carry extra clothes before you set out.

               

              Large thick black garbage bags can be used as emergency shelters so put one or two in your kayak this winter.

               

              You could also carry a thermos of hot non caffeinated tea.

               

              If I missed something let me know.

               

              Pat Owen

              Southwest Florida Paddling Club

               



              --
              Deborah Rowland
              239-732-1344
            • Patrick Dobbels
              Hi Everybody  On a cold day. I aways take a good breathable rain suit with taped seems. Also a goretex booney hat,neo water socks,neo water booties,neo
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 8, 2010
                Hi Everybody
                 On a cold day. I aways take a good breathable rain suit with taped seems. Also a goretex booney hat,neo water socks,neo water booties,neo spray-skirt and some chocolate to eat. My experience is that as you warm up and the day goes by you will want to shed some of this stuff. So a small dry bag to put it in that can be easily accessed is great to have. Also remember to keep hydrated. We all have are own things that are only essential to ourselves. Keep that in mind.
                                   Patrick 

              • Regis Good
                Good tips Patrick! Thanks, Rege ... From: Patrick Dobbels Subject: [swflpc] Cool weather paddling clothes and stuff... To:
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 9, 2010
                  Good tips Patrick!

                  Thanks,
                  Rege

                  --- On Mon, 11/8/10, Patrick Dobbels <partickdobbels@...> wrote:

                  From: Patrick Dobbels <partickdobbels@...>
                  Subject: [swflpc] Cool weather paddling clothes and stuff...
                  To: swflpc@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Monday, November 8, 2010, 12:38 PM

                   

                  Hi Everybody
                   On a cold day. I aways take a good breathable rain suit with taped seems. Also a goretex booney hat,neo water socks,neo water booties,neo spray-skirt and some chocolate to eat. My experience is that as you warm up and the day goes by you will want to shed some of this stuff. So a small dry bag to put it in that can be easily accessed is great to have. Also remember to keep hydrated. We all have are own things that are only essential to ourselves. Keep that in mind.
                                     Patrick 


                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.