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Going with Thunderbolt

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  • Robert Lawson Brown
    Hello SVMUG members, I just finished a little conversion project. In the past, I have been using Firewire and USB connected hard drives, for critical duties of
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2012
      Hello SVMUG members,

      I just finished a little conversion project. In the past, I have been using Firewire and USB connected hard drives, for critical duties of holding my Aperture library, iTunes Media folder, Time Machine backup database, and enormous video files. I have moved this data to a pair of LaCie RAID drives (4TB and 6TB), with Thunderbolt connections. The difference is very noticeable -- much faster access, file movement, etc.

      I am using the default out-of-the-box RAID 0 configuration. This means the two drives in each LaCie box are used in the non-redundant striped data recording. This yields high performance, as data blocks are fetched by sequential alternation between the two drives. The two drives look like a single drive -- e.g. a pair of 3TB drives becomes a massive 6TB drive. But there is consequence: if either drive fails, the whole thing fails.

      Another option is RAID 1. In this case, the two drives are mirrors of each other. If one fails, the other still has the data. But then the capacity has been cut in half.

      Finally, there is the non-RAID option: JBOD -- "just a bunch of drives". This gives you the highest capacity. There is no redundancy, but at least if a drive fails, the data on the other drive in the box is unaffected. Plus, the drives in this configuration are hot-swappable.

      When I can I will add more drives. A rational configuration is to use RAID 1 for a drive set will hold critical data like my iTunes media folder and my Aperture Library. A RAID 0 should be used for the work-in-progress video files. A separate RAID 0 will be for the Time Machine backup, which needs a massive drive.

      -- Robert Brown
    • Jose Francisco Medeiros
      Hi Robert, I am amazed at the I/O speeds advertsied for Thunderbolt. It has better I/O then a 8GB fiber channel connection used in the Storage Area Networks
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 1, 2012
        Hi Robert,

        I am amazed at the I/O speeds advertsied for Thunderbolt. It has better I/O then a 8GB fiber channel connection used in the Storage Area Networks that I once worked on when I was employed in Information Technology and now going on past three years of unemployment.

        I am curious if there is a Mac I/O or  iOPS test tool like iOmeter, http://www.iometer.org/ you can use to measure your actual I/O performance in real world.

        Why not RAID 5 if you have at least three drives?

        Happy Fourth of July everyone.

        Jose F. Medeiros :-)
        408-256-0649
        http://www.linkedin.com/in/josemedeiros

        ----------------------------------------------------------

        On Sun, Jul 1, 2012 at 12:19 AM, Robert Lawson Brown <rlbrown@...> wrote:
         

        Hello SVMUG members,

        I just finished a little conversion project. In the past, I have been using Firewire and USB connected hard drives, for critical duties of holding my Aperture library, iTunes Media folder, Time Machine backup database, and enormous video files. I have moved this data to a pair of LaCie RAID drives (4TB and 6TB), with Thunderbolt connections. The difference is very noticeable -- much faster access, file movement, etc.

        I am using the default out-of-the-box RAID 0 configuration. This means the two drives in each LaCie box are used in the non-redundant striped data recording. This yields high performance, as data blocks are fetched by sequential alternation between the two drives. The two drives look like a single drive -- e.g. a pair of 3TB drives becomes a massive 6TB drive. But there is consequence: if either drive fails, the whole thing fails.

        Another option is RAID 1. In this case, the two drives are mirrors of each other. If one fails, the other still has the data. But then the capacity has been cut in half.

        Finally, there is the non-RAID option: JBOD -- "just a bunch of drives". This gives you the highest capacity. There is no redundancy, but at least if a drive fails, the data on the other drive in the box is unaffected. Plus, the drives in this configuration are hot-swappable.

        When I can I will add more drives. A rational configuration is to use RAID 1 for a drive set will hold critical data like my iTunes media folder and my Aperture Library. A RAID 0 should be used for the work-in-progress video files. A separate RAID 0 will be for the Time Machine backup, which needs a massive drive.

        -- Robert Brown


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