Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: New article

Expand Messages
  • israel_eisenberg
    Narendra, Richard, Brad thanks. ... I knew one day someone will find something practical to do with my articles :)
    Message 1 of 21 , Dec 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Narendra, Richard, Brad thanks.

      >>I read some of your article. Then I realized how I could do eye lashes in SVG...

      I knew one day someone will find something practical to do with my articles :)
    • israel_eisenberg
      Hi to all, Just finish writing a new article: The Normal Gradient http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/article3.html Hope you find it interesting Regards,
      Message 2 of 21 , Jan 14, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi to all,

        Just finish writing a new article: The Normal Gradient

        http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/article3.html

        Hope you find it interesting

        Regards,

        Israel
      • Francis Hemsher
        Hi Israel, This is very intresting to me. Nice work. I ve stayed away from SVG filters because of slow rendering(ie/asv). However, I surely use gradients
        Message 3 of 21 , Jan 14, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Israel,

          This is very intresting to me. Nice work. I've stayed away from SVG filters because of slow rendering(ie/asv). However, I surely use gradients because they don't seem to bog down performance in the same way as filters.
          Have you done any performance testing for your tubefy gradients? Say I had 500 elements in an svg document, and 20 of them were tubefy gradients. How would the image generally respond to initial loading and zoom/pan rendering?
          Also, could a tubefy gradient respond quickly when turned on/off via mouseover/out event for an element?

          Thanks,
          Francis

          --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "israel_eisenberg" <owlgems@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi to all,
          >
          > Just finish writing a new article: The Normal Gradient
          >
          > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/article3.html
          >
          > Hope you find it interesting
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > Israel
          >
        • israel_eisenberg
          Hi Francis, Glad you find my work interesting (and nice), thanks. Any demo in the article which is not activated (all those who start as empty blue frames),
          Message 4 of 21 , Jan 16, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Francis,

            Glad you find my work interesting (and nice), thanks.

            Any demo in the article which is not activated (all those who start as
            empty blue frames), can be used as test case for loading time. As their
            file sizes are negligible, just see how fast they are constructed after
            you click them. I think best testers would be the more heavy ones:

            The Q demo (2848 paths):

            http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/Q.svg

            can also serve as test case for zooming and mouse response.

            The hue-disk demo (more than 1500 clones):

            http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/hue_disk.svg

            and the place-of-interest demo (1200 clones):

            http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/poi_move.svg

            are good testers with the latter also good as a mouse interaction test:
            consider each time you click, 1200 individual paths change their color
            simultaneously.

            Assuming "turned on/off" means "appear/disappear", I made the
            place-of-interest demo do just that on mouseover/out and put it here:

            http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/poi_move_hide.svg

            Generally peaking, IE/ASV (I test on IE6) perform very well as compared
            to other browsers, both on construction times and JavaScript response.

            Regards,

            Israel



            --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "Francis Hemsher" <fhemsher@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Israel,
            >
            > This is very intresting to me. Nice work. I've stayed away from SVG filters because of slow rendering(ie/asv). However, I surely use gradients because they don't seem to bog down performance in the same way as filters.
            > Have you done any performance testing for your tubefy gradients? Say I had 500 elements in an svg document, and 20 of them were tubefy gradients. How would the image generally respond to initial loading and zoom/pan rendering?
            > Also, could a tubefy gradient respond quickly when turned on/off via mouseover/out event for an element?
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Francis
            >
            > --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "israel_eisenberg" <owlgems@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi to all,
            > >
            > > Just finish writing a new article: The Normal Gradient
            > >
            > > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/article3.html
            > >
            > > Hope you find it interesting
            > >
            > > Regards,
            > >
            > > Israel
            > >
            >
          • jeff_schiller
            Israel, You need to get together a paper/talk for SVG Open 2010! Jeff
            Message 5 of 21 , Jan 16, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Israel,

              You need to get together a paper/talk for SVG Open 2010!

              Jeff

              --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "israel_eisenberg" <owlgems@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Francis,
              >
              > Glad you find my work interesting (and nice), thanks.
              >
              > Any demo in the article which is not activated (all those who start as
              > empty blue frames), can be used as test case for loading time. As their
              > file sizes are negligible, just see how fast they are constructed after
              > you click them. I think best testers would be the more heavy ones:
              >
              > The Q demo (2848 paths):
              >
              > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/Q.svg
              >
              > can also serve as test case for zooming and mouse response.
              >
              > The hue-disk demo (more than 1500 clones):
              >
              > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/hue_disk.svg
              >
              > and the place-of-interest demo (1200 clones):
              >
              > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/poi_move.svg
              >
              > are good testers with the latter also good as a mouse interaction test:
              > consider each time you click, 1200 individual paths change their color
              > simultaneously.
              >
              > Assuming "turned on/off" means "appear/disappear", I made the
              > place-of-interest demo do just that on mouseover/out and put it here:
              >
              > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/poi_move_hide.svg
              >
              > Generally peaking, IE/ASV (I test on IE6) perform very well as compared
              > to other browsers, both on construction times and JavaScript response.
              >
              > Regards,
              >
              > Israel
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "Francis Hemsher" <fhemsher@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi Israel,
              > >
              > > This is very intresting to me. Nice work. I've stayed away from SVG filters because of slow rendering(ie/asv). However, I surely use gradients because they don't seem to bog down performance in the same way as filters.
              > > Have you done any performance testing for your tubefy gradients? Say I had 500 elements in an svg document, and 20 of them were tubefy gradients. How would the image generally respond to initial loading and zoom/pan rendering?
              > > Also, could a tubefy gradient respond quickly when turned on/off via mouseover/out event for an element?
              > >
              > > Thanks,
              > > Francis
              > >
              > > --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "israel_eisenberg" <owlgems@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Hi to all,
              > > >
              > > > Just finish writing a new article: The Normal Gradient
              > > >
              > > > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/article3.html
              > > >
              > > > Hope you find it interesting
              > > >
              > > > Regards,
              > > >
              > > > Israel
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • Francis Hemsher
              Thanks, Israel, for the comeback. I m working on an app that provides the user the ability to add gradients, or a mask gradient, to an element. I m considering
              Message 6 of 21 , Jan 16, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks, Israel, for the comeback.

                I'm working on an app that provides the user the ability to add gradients, or a mask gradient, to an element. I'm considering also including your Normal Gradient feature. Would that be OK with you?
                It would have a selection pane, providing the user 2-color choices and the ability to input various values to dynamically preview the result.(Similar to that presently for the gradient and mask panes).
                See: http://www.svgDiscovery.com

                Regards,
                Francis

                --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "israel_eisenberg" <owlgems@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi Francis,
                >
                > Glad you find my work interesting (and nice), thanks.
                >
                > Any demo in the article which is not activated (all those who start as
                > empty blue frames), can be used as test case for loading time. As their
                > file sizes are negligible, just see how fast they are constructed after
                > you click them. I think best testers would be the more heavy ones:
                >
                > The Q demo (2848 paths):
                >
                > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/Q.svg
                >
                > can also serve as test case for zooming and mouse response.
                >
                > The hue-disk demo (more than 1500 clones):
                >
                > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/hue_disk.svg
                >
                > and the place-of-interest demo (1200 clones):
                >
                > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/poi_move.svg
                >
                > are good testers with the latter also good as a mouse interaction test:
                > consider each time you click, 1200 individual paths change their color
                > simultaneously.
                >
                > Assuming "turned on/off" means "appear/disappear", I made the
                > place-of-interest demo do just that on mouseover/out and put it here:
                >
                > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/poi_move_hide.svg
                >
                > Generally peaking, IE/ASV (I test on IE6) perform very well as compared
                > to other browsers, both on construction times and JavaScript response.
                >
                > Regards,
                >
                > Israel
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "Francis Hemsher" <fhemsher@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Hi Israel,
                > >
                > > This is very intresting to me. Nice work. I've stayed away from SVG filters because of slow rendering(ie/asv). However, I surely use gradients because they don't seem to bog down performance in the same way as filters.
                > > Have you done any performance testing for your tubefy gradients? Say I had 500 elements in an svg document, and 20 of them were tubefy gradients. How would the image generally respond to initial loading and zoom/pan rendering?
                > > Also, could a tubefy gradient respond quickly when turned on/off via mouseover/out event for an element?
                > >
                > > Thanks,
                > > Francis
                > >
                > > --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "israel_eisenberg" <owlgems@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Hi to all,
                > > >
                > > > Just finish writing a new article: The Normal Gradient
                > > >
                > > > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/article3.html
                > > >
                > > > Hope you find it interesting
                > > >
                > > > Regards,
                > > >
                > > > Israel
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • israel_eisenberg
                ... Thanks Jeff. Promise I will consider it, but then, it means I have to invent something new, assuming nobody is interested in reading/hearing something
                Message 7 of 21 , Jan 17, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  Jeff Schiller wrote:

                  >>You need to get together a paper/talk for SVG Open 2010!

                  Thanks Jeff.

                  Promise I will consider it, but then, it means I have to invent something new,
                  assuming nobody is interested in reading/hearing something which is already
                  in an article on the Net :)

                  May I use this opportunity to congrat you on the release of SVG-edit 2.4. It has few
                  qualities I personally appreciate in a good app: Simple, clean and very good usability.
                  I find myself using it again and again for fast sketches of prototypes. Output code
                  has same qualities: Simple and clean. Very nice.


                  Francis Hemsher wrote:

                  >>I'm considering also including your Normal Gradient feature. Would that be OK with you?

                  By all means Francis, go ahead and use it with my blessing. The normalGradient is licensed
                  (and practically stand-alone) in all the demos so you actually don't need my OK to use it,
                  though your courtesy is appreciated, just use whatever you need. Any help you need adapting
                  it to your particular app, don't hesitate to call me.

                  What outcome of an article can be more rewarding than someone wants to implement it few
                  days after publication? (and someone else suggest to present it in SVG Open :))

                  Regards,

                  Israel

                  ==================================================================

                  --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "Francis Hemsher" <fhemsher@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks, Israel, for the comeback.
                  >
                  > I'm working on an app that provides the user the ability to add gradients, or a mask gradient, to an element. I'm considering also including your Normal Gradient feature. Would that be OK with you?
                  > It would have a selection pane, providing the user 2-color choices and the ability to input various values to dynamically preview the result.(Similar to that presently for the gradient and mask panes).
                  > See: http://www.svgDiscovery.com
                  >
                  > Regards,
                  > Francis
                  >
                  > --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "israel_eisenberg" <owlgems@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hi Francis,
                  > >
                  > > Glad you find my work interesting (and nice), thanks.
                  > >
                  > > Any demo in the article which is not activated (all those who start as
                  > > empty blue frames), can be used as test case for loading time. As their
                  > > file sizes are negligible, just see how fast they are constructed after
                  > > you click them. I think best testers would be the more heavy ones:
                  > >
                  > > The Q demo (2848 paths):
                  > >
                  > > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/Q.svg
                  > >
                  > > can also serve as test case for zooming and mouse response.
                  > >
                  > > The hue-disk demo (more than 1500 clones):
                  > >
                  > > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/hue_disk.svg
                  > >
                  > > and the place-of-interest demo (1200 clones):
                  > >
                  > > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/poi_move.svg
                  > >
                  > > are good testers with the latter also good as a mouse interaction test:
                  > > consider each time you click, 1200 individual paths change their color
                  > > simultaneously.
                  > >
                  > > Assuming "turned on/off" means "appear/disappear", I made the
                  > > place-of-interest demo do just that on mouseover/out and put it here:
                  > >
                  > > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/images/article3/poi_move_hide.svg
                  > >
                  > > Generally peaking, IE/ASV (I test on IE6) perform very well as compared
                  > > to other browsers, both on construction times and JavaScript response.
                  > >
                  > > Regards,
                  > >
                  > > Israel
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "Francis Hemsher" <fhemsher@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Hi Israel,
                  > > >
                  > > > This is very intresting to me. Nice work. I've stayed away from SVG filters because of slow rendering(ie/asv). However, I surely use gradients because they don't seem to bog down performance in the same way as filters.
                  > > > Have you done any performance testing for your tubefy gradients? Say I had 500 elements in an svg document, and 20 of them were tubefy gradients. How would the image generally respond to initial loading and zoom/pan rendering?
                  > > > Also, could a tubefy gradient respond quickly when turned on/off via mouseover/out event for an element?
                  > > >
                  > > > Thanks,
                  > > > Francis
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "israel_eisenberg" <owlgems@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Hi to all,
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Just finish writing a new article: The Normal Gradient
                  > > > >
                  > > > > http://owl3d.com/svg/tubefy/articles/article3.html
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Hope you find it interesting
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Regards,
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Israel
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Andrew Matseevsky
                  I m trying for some timešto implementšgradients into vector graphic. There are at least two different variants of gradients, what might be useful. You may
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jan 30, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I'm trying for some time�to implement�gradients into vector graphic. There are at least two different variants of gradients, what might be useful. You may visit my site http://www.smartfills.com , where you may see some samples and download corresponding progs as well.�It could be interesting for you, if you wanna to expand existing specification of SVG�a little.
                    Andrey.


                    ________________________________________________________
                    �� ��� � Yahoo!?
                    ��������� ����������� � ����������. Yahoo! �����! http://ru.mail.yahoo.com

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Francis Hemsher
                    Hi Andrew, I looked at your PaintingPen and PaintingTool, both under development. Someday, hopefully, they will build exquisite SVG documents. I have a
                    Message 9 of 21 , Jan 31, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hi Andrew,

                      I looked at your PaintingPen and PaintingTool, both under development.
                      Someday, hopefully, they will build exquisite SVG documents.
                      I have a suggestion, which I have tried that seems very nice in user tactile feedback. This relates to the freehand drawing of the path:
                      Buffer the user track to remove obviously unwanted squiggles. This may cause the rendered path to slightly fall behind the cursor track itself. However, the smoothness of the resulting freehand path provides the user with a pleasing 'real-time' view of the finished path. Of course, the final rendering will occur when the path is finished.
                      Another feature I have tried that looks good, is to provide the user the ability to toggle, during the creation of the path, whether they want a 'straight' or 'smooth' segment. This toggles the buffer algorithm on the live path.
                      Also, I have found that by saving the user's track points during the live path, and providing a slider to access the points, they can selectively back track the path, and re-continue it at the last track-back point.

                      Anyway, just some thoughts.
                      Good luck with you programs.
                      Francis

                      --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Matseevsky wrote:

                      >
                      > I'm trying for some timešto implementšgradients into vector graphic. There are at least two different variants of gradients, what might be useful. You may visit my site http://www.smartfills.com , where you may see some samples and download corresponding progs as well.šIt could be interesting for you, if you wanna to expand existing specification of SVGša little.
                      > Andrey.
                      >
                    • Cameron Laird
                      On Sun, Jan 31, 2010 at 05:36:37PM -0000, Francis Hemsher wrote: . . . ... . . . Good suggestions. Francis, when you write, Buffer ... , is that what I call
                      Message 10 of 21 , Jan 31, 2010
                      • 0 Attachment
                        On Sun, Jan 31, 2010 at 05:36:37PM -0000, Francis Hemsher wrote:
                        .
                        .
                        .
                        > I looked at your PaintingPen and PaintingTool, both under development.
                        > Someday, hopefully, they will build exquisite SVG documents.
                        > I have a suggestion, which I have tried that seems very nice in user tactile feedback. This relates to the freehand drawing of the path:
                        > Buffer the user track to remove obviously unwanted squiggles. This may cause the rendered path to slightly fall behind the cursor track itself. However, the smoothness of the resulting freehand path provides the user with a pleasing 'real-time' view of the finished path. Of course, the final rendering will occur when the path is finished.
                        > Another feature I have tried that looks good, is to provide the user the ability to toggle, during the creation of the path, whether they want a 'straight' or 'smooth' segment. This toggles the buffer algorithm on the live path.
                        > Also, I have found that by saving the user's track points during the live path, and providing a slider to access the points, they can selectively back track the path, and re-continue it at the last track-back point.
                        >
                        > Anyway, just some thoughts.
                        > Good luck with you programs.
                        .
                        .
                        .
                        Good suggestions.

                        Francis, when you write, "Buffer ...", is that what I call buffering
                        (*delay* in time), or smoothing (which only coincidentally introduces
                        a time lag)?
                      • Francis Hemsher
                        Yes, Cameron, The smoothing, coincidently produces the time lag.
                        Message 11 of 21 , Jan 31, 2010
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Yes, Cameron,
                          The smoothing, coincidently produces the time lag.

                          --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, Cameron Laird <claird@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > On Sun, Jan 31, 2010 at 05:36:37PM -0000, Francis Hemsher wrote:
                          > .
                          > .
                          > .
                          > > I looked at your PaintingPen and PaintingTool, both under development.
                          > > Someday, hopefully, they will build exquisite SVG documents.
                          > > I have a suggestion, which I have tried that seems very nice in user tactile feedback. This relates to the freehand drawing of the path:
                          > > Buffer the user track to remove obviously unwanted squiggles. This may cause the rendered path to slightly fall behind the cursor track itself. However, the smoothness of the resulting freehand path provides the user with a pleasing 'real-time' view of the finished path. Of course, the final rendering will occur when the path is finished.
                          > > Another feature I have tried that looks good, is to provide the user the ability to toggle, during the creation of the path, whether they want a 'straight' or 'smooth' segment. This toggles the buffer algorithm on the live path.
                          > > Also, I have found that by saving the user's track points during the live path, and providing a slider to access the points, they can selectively back track the path, and re-continue it at the last track-back point.
                          > >
                          > > Anyway, just some thoughts.
                          > > Good luck with you programs.
                          > .
                          > .
                          > .
                          > Good suggestions.
                          >
                          > Francis, when you write, "Buffer ...", is that what I call buffering
                          > (*delay* in time), or smoothing (which only coincidentally introduces
                          > a time lag)?
                          >
                        • Andrew Matseevsky
                          ... A problem exists here. Current SVG specification should be expanded a little to support vertices- based gradients (and contour- based too, of course). My
                          Message 12 of 21 , Jan 31, 2010
                          • 0 Attachment
                            > I looked at your PaintingPen and PaintingTool, both under development.
                            > Someday, hopefully, they will build exquisite SVG documents.

                            A problem exists here. Current SVG specification should be expanded a little to support vertices- based gradients (and contour- based too, of course). My SVSViewer contents some sample files, intended to demonstrate which sort of additional records should be included into SVG specification.

                            > I have a suggestion, which I have tried that seems very nice in user >tactile feedback. This relates to the freehand drawing of the path:
                            > Buffer the user track to remove obviously unwanted squiggles. This may >cause the rendered path to slightly fall behind the cursor track itself. >However, the smoothness of the resulting freehand path provides the user >with a pleasing 'real-time' view of the finished path. Of course, the >final rendering will occur when the path is finished.

                            Well, it might be usefull. Currently I have only one artist in a hand-reach, which plays with my soft. May be, I'll make this enhantment after a while, when I have more free time.

                            > Another feature I have tried that looks good, is to provide the user the >ability to toggle, during the creation of the path, whether they want >a 'straight' or 'smooth' segment. This toggles the buffer algorithm on >the live path.

                            'Stright' segments currently are not implemented. My prog produces only Bezier curves.

                            > Also, I have found that by saving the user's track points during the >live path, and providing a slider to access the points, they can >selectively back track the path, and re-continue it at the last track->back point.

                            Of course, re-continue the last path is useful. Otherwise one will be forced to graw a long path with one unbroken movement, what is not an easy op.

                            I wanted to incorporate a raster to vector converter into my progs, to offer a user a good start point to create vector images (of course, it is much simpler to take a snapshot, convert it to vector and edit a little than create a vector 'from zero level'). If it is interesting for you, you may download my last experiments - http://www.smartfills.com/Html/PhotoToPicture.zip . This prog is intended to demonstrate, which sort of vectors could be obtained from their raster prototypes (I dare to say, that my raster to vector converter is the best one).

                            Let me know, if you have some ideas about what could be incorporated into my progs. Currently I took a timeout, because I do need earn money for living. I do some work for cartographs. But, I gonna go back to my vector graphic after a while.



                            ________________________________________________________
                            Вы уже с Yahoo!?
                            Испытайте обновленную и улучшенную. Yahoo! Почту! http://ru.mail.yahoo.com
                          • Francis Hemsher
                            I used three of Andrew s programs(SVGViewer,PaintingPen, and PainitngTool). They are in development, but are good examples on what he believes would improve
                            Message 13 of 21 , Feb 1, 2010
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I used three of Andrew's programs(SVGViewer,PaintingPen, and PainitngTool). They are in development, but are good examples on what he believes would improve SVG.
                              Do others agree that Vertices-Based and Contour-Based gradients should/can be included in SVG?

                              Regards,
                              Francis

                              --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Matseevsky Wrote:---
                              "I'm trying for some time implement gradients into vector graphic. There are
                              at least two different variants of gradients, what might be useful. You may
                              visit my site http://www.smartfills.com , where you may see some samples and
                              download corresponding progs as well. It could be interesting for you, if you
                              wanna to expand existing specification of SVG a little.

                              A problem exists here. Current SVG specification should be expanded a little to support vertices- based gradients (and contour- based too, of course). My SVSViewer contents some sample files, intended to demonstrate which sort of additional records should be included into SVG specification."
                            • israel_eisenberg
                              Hi to all http://owl3d.com/svg/Splines/Splines_to_SVG.html Regards Israel
                              Message 14 of 21 , Sep 12, 2012
                              • 0 Attachment
                              • fhemsher
                                ... Isreal strikes again...a Masterpiece!
                                Message 15 of 21 , Sep 16, 2012
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  --- In svg-developers@yahoogroups.com, "israel_eisenberg" <owlgems@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Hi to all
                                  >
                                  > http://owl3d.com/svg/Splines/Splines_to_SVG.html
                                  >
                                  > Regards
                                  >
                                  > Israel
                                  >
                                  Isreal strikes again...a Masterpiece!
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.