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Re: [SUSE Linux Users] where is PATH=$PATH:/.... ??

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  • horrorvacui@gmx.net
    On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 06:52:39 -0000 ... It seems like over the past ten years you ve had much more luck than brains... Time you started pushing the balance
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 1, 2006
      On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 06:52:39 -0000
      "jerome" <romansky2002@...> wrote:

      > Einsteinwitz, thanks for your reply!
      >
      > Eeeek! I've been discovered. Yep running as root and have been doing
      > so for the past ten years -- nothing bad has happened to me (yet). Am
      > I lucky or are you extra extra cautious?

      It seems like over the past ten years you've had much more luck than
      brains... Time you started pushing the balance towards brains.

      To run as root is the first impulse of a newbie who notices, for sake
      of an example, that he can't access his cd-writer as a normal user. The
      newbie usually also doesn't know, or bother to find out, that it's
      possible to selectively or generally allow access to almost anything he
      needs. So he continues running as root, asking for trouble. That you
      have managed to keep it up for so long without any major damage is a
      mystery to me. Are you sure really nothing happened - mind you, having
      to re-install the OS every now and then may be normal practice for
      other OSes, with GNU/Linux it is a doubleplusungood thing to happen.

      Running as non-root simply reduces the damage any of the possible
      factors - programming errors, the net and last but not least, yourself
      - can cause. Try to delete important files as a normal user and you
      will fail, as root, you will not. Reducing the level of access to your
      system is a very effective safety net, and - contrary to other OSes
      already mentioned - it also doesn't cripple your system. So there's no
      reason not to use it.

      Cheers
      --
      Horror Vacui

      War Is Peace
      Freedom Is Slavery
      Ignorance Is Strength
    • ROLAND L BEHUNIN
      Hello, I have been installing new distributions of SUSE every year or two. However, I found that if you partition your hard drive so you have one partiton as
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 1, 2006
        Hello,

        I have been installing new distributions of SUSE every year or two. However, I found that if you partition your hard drive so you have one partiton as a /home to keep your data in, and do not overwrite or format that partition you can upgrade from one distribution to another and not loose your data.

        (From Suse 9.1 to Suse 10.0, or from SUSE to Ubuntu, or come back form Ubuntu to SUSE).

        When I attempted to share the home partiton between two seperate distributions, the computer sort of went nuts...

        roland

        -----Original Message-----
        From: "horrorvacui@..." <horrorvacui@...>
        To: suselinuxusers@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2006 13:59:36 +0100
        Subject: Re: [SUSE Linux Users] where is PATH=$PATH:/.... ??

        On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 06:52:39 -0000
        "jerome" <romansky2002@...> wrote:

        > Einsteinwitz, thanks for your reply!
        >
        > Eeeek! I've been discovered. Yep running as root and have been doing
        > so for the past ten years -- nothing bad has happened to me (yet). Am
        > I lucky or are you extra extra cautious?

        It seems like over the past ten years you've had much more luck than
        brains... Time you started pushing the balance towards brains.

        To run as root is the first impulse of a newbie who notices, for sake
        of an example, that he can't access his cd-writer as a normal user. The
        newbie usually also doesn't know, or bother to find out, that it's
        possible to selectively or generally allow access to almost anything he
        needs. So he continues running as root, asking for trouble. That you
        have managed to keep it up for so long without any major damage is a
        mystery to me. Are you sure really nothing happened - mind you, having
        to re-install the OS every now and then may be normal practice for
        other OSes, with GNU/Linux it is a doubleplusungood thing to happen.

        Running as non-root simply reduces the damage any of the possible
        factors - programming errors, the net and last but not least, yourself
        - can cause. Try to delete important files as a normal user and you
        will fail, as root, you will not. Reducing the level of access to your
        system is a very effective safety net, and - contrary to other OSes
        already mentioned - it also doesn't cripple your system. So there's no
        reason not to use it.

        Cheers
        --
        Horror Vacui

        War Is Peace
        Freedom Is Slavery
        Ignorance Is Strength
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