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Re: Help w/ Networks, Servers, Web Serve

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  • dae_mon_ik
    When building a server, there are some general questions that you should consider. 1> Is the server going to be in a local network only, with
    Message 1 of 1427 , Jan 29, 2002
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      When building a server, there are some general
      questions that you should consider.<br><br>1> Is the
      server going to be in a local network only, with
      specific times of availability, or accessed from the
      Internet 24/7<br><br>2> What services will you be
      offering? Email? News? Chat? Quake? Web? What secondary
      services will you be offering, such as a database tied to
      the webserver, guest ftp access,
      etc.<br><br>Depending on your needs, you could install linux and just
      enough tools to run apache in less than 100MB on a 486
      with 32MB of RAM and get very good performance from
      it. If the pc is intended to offer more than one
      service, then a P200-P266 with 64MB would do fine. (That's
      more than the Quake3 gameserver needs)<br><br>You
      don't begin to need anything serious until you're
      serving a database to a few thousand users, and even then
      the amount of RAM available is always more important
      than processing speed. Second to RAM is disk access
      speeds.<br><br>One of the servers I utilize at work has a PII 350
      and 384MB of RAM. It's currently serving SAMBA shares
      and printer access to 20 users. 90% of it's time is
      underutilized, but I'm not about to tell the boss it could run
      on anything less :) (Budgets are a precious
      thing)<br><br>Anyway, remember: When it comes to servers, RAM is very
      much more important than Processor.<br><br>I would
      suggest keeping the PIII box for Windows and gaming, then
      turning the K6 into a server/workstation with a RAM
      increase to at least 256MB. It should be able to support a
      local user, light web services and provide Internet
      connection sharing as well fairly easily.<br><br>If you
      intend on building another pc anyway, then seriously
      consider making the K6 a dedicated server and Internet
      access point since it would be much easier to make it
      secure against attack.
    • dapperdan12003
      ... I m no newbie to Linux. I ve had Mandrake 6, 8, and 10. I got SuSE 9.1 and I love it. I think you are right about YaST and SuSE. It was easy to install and
      Message 1427 of 1427 , Jul 23, 2004
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        --- In suselinuxusers@yahoogroups.com, simp03 wrote:
        > Is anybody there.....? <echo><br><br>Very
        > quiet group this - either you are much more contented
        > than other Linux users or much better sysadmins. It's
        > noticeable how few SuSE users post to the other help groups
        > - either YaST is proving it's worth in taking the
        > pain out for newbies or more experienced users move to
        > SuSE from distribs like Slackware and maybe
        > RH5.<br><br>Personally I subscribe to the idea that YaST is a
        > near-perfect ice-breaker for the newbie and will overcome most
        > of the little config probs that you see posted
        > elsewhere.<br><br>It would be interesting to see more opinions from
        > SuSE uses (even if just to kick some life into this
        > club).

        I'm no newbie to Linux. I've had Mandrake 6, 8, and 10. I
        got SuSE 9.1 and I love it. I think you are right about
        YaST and SuSE. It was easy to install and networked to
        my windows (sorry) machine flawlessly. I got on this site
        to see what was being posted . . .
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