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Ventura River Ecosystem: City plans threaten aquifers

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  • Paul Jenkin
    http://venturaecosystem.blogspot.com/2009/09/city-plans-threaten-aquifers.html Today, while the Sustainability Council was taking public comment on how to
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 21, 2009
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      http://venturaecosystem.blogspot.com/2009/09/city-plans-threaten-aquifers.html


      Today, while the 'Sustainability Council' was taking public comment on how to indefinitely continue the current growth rate in Ventura County, the City of Ventura was planning to certify another EIR to facilitate urbanization of some of the last agricultural lands within the city. A very telling letter from County water managers states, "We have reviewed the City's 2008 Biennial Water Supply Study (2008 Supply Report). We believe some of the assumptions may be flawed, and thus its predictions for future water supply may be overestimated."

      I sent the following letter to city council:


      To: Ventura City Council
      SUBJECT: Agenda Item #16 Saticoy and Wells Development Code and Final
      EIR: Addenda/Errata
      RE: FURTHER COMMENTS ON CITY OF VENTURA'S PLANNED ADOPTION
      OF THE SATICOY & WELLS COMMUNITY PLAN, DEVELOPMENT CODE AND
      REVIEW OF PROPOSED FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT (MP-
      152, Z-934. AO-233, EIR 2473)
      It has come to our attention that the Fox Canyon Groundwater Management
      Agency (FCGMA) has raised significant issues relating to the Saticoy & Wells
      Community Plan EIR. The FCGMA letter highlights key factors in the long-term
      sustainability of the city’s water supply. These issues are not adequately
      addressed in the EIR.
      As outlined by FCGMA water managers, cumulative impacts from a drought will
      (a) overdraft local aquifers causing saltwater intrusion, and (b) dry up the
      lower Ventura River, critical habitat for the endangered southern steelhead.
      The city is mistakenly seeking additional water supplies from new wells at
      Saticoy and Foster Park to provide for increased urban growth. The city is also
      mistaken in its bid to maintain the status quo at the wastewater treatment plant
      and delay modernization of outdated urban infrastructure such as storm drains,
      both of which could provide additional sources of water. Integrated Water
      Management should be a priority if the city wants to continue growth with these
      uncertain water supplies.
      I urge you to ask the right questions, and be aware of the implications of today’s
      decision.




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