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Re: A Stoic Calendar?

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  • John Barnett
    I like Nigel s idea of a Stoic calendar. I once quipped with a friend that the difference between a philosophy and a religion is that with religion you get
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 2, 2004
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      I like Nigel's idea of a Stoic calendar. I once quipped with a
      friend that the difference between a philosophy and a religion is
      that with religion you get holidays. I like the idea of setting
      aside times to periodically reflect on ideas and beliefs. I doubt if
      you could get many people to agree on what days to commemorate, but I
      personally like the concept. Nigel, I think I'm going to borrow some
      of your feast days; at least to "mark the day with a white stone" as
      the Romans would say.

      Now if I can just convince my boss to give me Marcus Aurelius
      Antonious' birthday off.....

      John


      --- In stoics@yahoogroups.com, "Nigel Glassborow" <thestoa@b...>
      wrote:
      > Following on from the idea of will power and self discipline, I
      would like to share the following idea.
      >
      >
      >
      > Most cultures and such like have a calendar - the purpose for the
      various philosophies is to create times when the follower of the
      philosophy will be reminded to take time out and re-root themselves
      in their philosophy. Where a person's life has been particularly
      hectic it is good to have a time to refresh one's belief.
      >
      >
      >
      > So looking at the Stoic philosophy I have set myself a calendar
      of 'celebration' days.
      >
      >
      >
      > The full moons - as feast days to celebrate life.
      >
      > The Sun's Equinoxes and Solstices - these have long been days to
      celebrate the cycles of life, which is one of the manifestation of
      Phusis.
      >
      > Olympus - this is the first full moon after the summer solstice,
      which I see as a day to honour the fathers of Stoicism.
      >
      > And,
      >
      > The Dodeka - the twelve days from the 21st December to and
      including the 1st January. This period goes back beyond the 12 days
      of Christmas, to pre Christian times. So I see no problem in sharing
      such a time, and setting it aside as a period of renewal and
      affirmation - both of one's beliefs and one's friendships.
      >
      >
      >
      > If nothing else, the wife (also a Stoic) sees the full moons as an
      excuse to eat out and save on washing up afterwards!
      >
      >
      >
      > Nigel
    • Adam Ophir Shapira
      ... Naw. There s a *lot* more difference than that. ... That could be useful. ... How about a lunar-solar calendar? Each new-moon s day is the first day of a
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 3, 2004
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        John Barnett wrote:

        >
        > I like Nigel's idea of a Stoic calendar. I once quipped with a
        > friend that the difference between a philosophy and a religion is
        > that with religion you get holidays.

        Naw. There's a *lot* more difference than that.


        > I like the idea of setting
        > aside times to periodically reflect on ideas and beliefs.

        That could be useful.


        > I doubt if
        > you could get many people to agree on what days to commemorate, but I
        > personally like the concept. Nigel, I think I'm going to borrow some
        > of your feast days; at least to "mark the day with a white stone" as
        > the Romans would say.

        How about a lunar-solar calendar?

        Each new-moon's day is the first day of a month.

        The new-year's day can be the first new-moon's day
        that falls on-or-after a certain solar marker.
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