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Re: [stoics] Re: A flashcard representation of Stolic practice

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  • Dave Kelly
    This flashcard representation of the Three Disciplines associates the three disciplines with Horney s three coping strategies and some typical irrational
    Message 1 of 101 , Jul 3, 2013
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      This flashcard representation of the Three Disciplines associates the
      three disciplines with Horney's three "coping strategies" and some
      typical irrational needs, or vices.


      Moving Toward People

      The need for help, guidance, and reassurance

      The Discipline of Judgment



      Moving Against People

      The need for recognition and approval

      The Discipline of Desire



      Moving Away from People

      The need for solitude

      The Discipline of Action



      Best wishes,
      Dave


      On Fri, Jun 28, 2013 at 11:48 AM, Dave Kelly <ptypes@...> wrote:
      > In a number of his meditations Marcus Aurelius (Hadot, Inner Citadel,
      > pp. 129-31) provides himself with an ontological foundation for the
      > disciplines of desire and action.
      >
      > Don't imagine that anything is important except that you act as
      > your_own_nature leads you and that you suffer as common_nature ordains
      > (XII, 32, 3).
      >
      > At this moment I have what common _Nature wants me to have in this
      > moment, and I'm doing what my_own_nature wants me do be doing at this
      > moment (V, 25).
      >
      > No one is going to stop you from living according to the reason of
      > your_own_nature, and nothing will happen to you contrary to the reason
      > of common Nature (VI, 58).
      >
      > What evil can there be for you, if you _do_ that which, in this
      > present moment, is appropriate to your_nature; and if you _accept that
      > which, in this present moment, comes at the moment which is opportune
      > for the Nature of the All (XI, 13, 4).
      >
      > Nothing will happen to me which is not in accordance with the Nature
      > of the Whole, and it is possible for me to _do_ nothing which is
      > contrary to my_god_and_my_daimon (V, 10, 6).
      >
      > Keep looking straight ahead, in order to see where nature is leading
      > you; both the_nature of the_All, by means of the events which happen
      > to you, and your_own_nature, by means of that which you must_do (VII,
      > 55, 1).
      >
      > He who flees the reason of the human community is a fugitive. He who
      > separates and distances himself from the Reason of common Nature, and
      > complains about what happens to him, is an abscess upon the world ...
      > He who splits off his own particular soul from the soul of other
      > rational beings is like an amputated limb of the city, for the soul is
      > one (IV, 29, 2).
      >
      > Best wishes,
      > Dave
      >
      >
      >
      > On Sun, Jun 23, 2013 at 12:46 PM, Dave <ptypes@...> wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Below is an exercise of Stoic `mindfulness' (_prosoche_, `awareness of
      >> oneself', especially of one's judgments). by Donald Robertson.
      >>
      >> The Discipline of Assent, or Judgment, can be said to be the method of the
      >> other two disciplines.
      >
      > [snip]
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > It's not events that trouble us, but our judgments about events.
      > The universe is change; life is judgment.



      --
      It's not events that trouble us, but our judgments about events.
      The universe is change; life is judgment.
    • ptypes
      Epictetus most often and predominently describes the good as a prohairesis in accordance with nature or as making proper use of impressions. Goods are things
      Message 101 of 101 , Apr 9
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        Epictetus most often and predominently describes the good as a prohairesis in accordance with nature or as making proper use of impressions.

         

        Goods are things in our power.

         

        So, making proper use of impressions is in our power.

        In our power are judgment, intention, desire and aversion, in a word, every that is our own doing.

         

        Judgment, intention, desire and aversion are the capacities, or powers, we exercise  to make proper use of impressions.

         

        So, making proper use of impressions is in our power. Everything else is not in our power.

         

        An awareness of this dichotomy is the attitude to have for making proper use of impressions.

         

        Regards,

        Dave

         

         

         

         

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