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Re: Stoicism and mathematics

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  • Paul G
    ... The Hellenistic Philosophers, Vol. I by A. A. Long, D. N. Sedley has original sources and commentary. On P.301 they indicate that in the Hellenistic age,
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 1, 2010
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      --- In stoics@yahoogroups.com, William Denton <wtd@...> wrote:
      >
      > Can anyone point me towards any discussions of the Stoic approach to
      > mathematics?


      The Hellenistic Philosophers, Vol. I by A. A. Long, D. N. Sedley has original sources and commentary. On P.301 they indicate that in the Hellenistic age, in general, philosophers had not much interest in mathematics. That said, L&S point out that the stoics regarded limits as purely mental constructs, and fall "outside the corporeal-incorporeal dichotomy". I guess that means the stoics think limits, and other mathematical constructs, are not objects you can "hold", or Platonic ideal forms? This sounds like Lakoff & Nunez - worth reading if you want a modern attack on Platonism in mathematics!
    • Kevin
      Posidonius was the only Stoic who was a noted mathmatician, I am aware of. There are some works about him but I haven t read them.   Regards Kevin ... From:
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 1, 2010
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        Posidonius was the only Stoic who was a noted mathmatician, I am aware of. There are some works about him but I haven't read them.
         
        Regards
        Kevin

        --- On Wed, 9/1/10, Paul G <pgrieg@...> wrote:

        From: Paul G <pgrieg@...>
        Subject: [stoics] Re: Stoicism and mathematics
        To: stoics@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, September 1, 2010, 6:42 AM

         


        --- In stoics@yahoogroups.com, William Denton <wtd@...> wrote:
        >
        > Can anyone point me towards any discussions of the Stoic approach to
        > mathematics?

        The Hellenistic Philosophers, Vol. I by A. A. Long, D. N. Sedley has original sources and commentary. On P.301 they indicate that in the Hellenistic age, in general, philosophers had not much interest in mathematics. That said, L&S point out that the stoics regarded limits as purely mental constructs, and fall "outside the corporeal-incorporeal dichotomy". I guess that means the stoics think limits, and other mathematical constructs, are not objects you can "hold", or Platonic ideal forms? This sounds like Lakoff & Nunez - worth reading if you want a modern attack on Platonism in mathematics!


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