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Re: questions on some basic stoic principles

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  • kbkbk0
    Regarding things in one s own control. There are two different senses of things being in one s own control. Firstly there is the fatalistic sense, which denies
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 5, 2010
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      Regarding things in one's own control.

      There are two different senses of things being in one's own control. Firstly there is the fatalistic sense, which denies free will, and holds that fate or existence is responsible for everything. This may be due to a belief in total determinism (where the future follows determined by the past), or in static time (where the future is held to exist equally with the present and the past).

      To quote Seneca's "On Providence", "everything proceeds according to law that is fixed and enacted for all time. Fate guides us, and it was settled at the first hour of birth what length of time remains for each... Long ago it was determined what would make you rejoice, what would make you weep". Or in a famous quote by the philosopher Schopenhauer's "a man can do as he will, but not will as he will".

      There is a second sense, the practical one. Whether one believes in free will ('real' choice) or the illusion of choice: some things cannot be controlled in either case. The past is the classic example. Nothing we do can alter that now, so why be upset? Or a bereavement or loss: what can we do to change it?

      --- In stoics@yahoogroups.com, "tomvee22" <tomvee22@...> wrote:
      >
      > 1. Things in one's own control
      >
      > As I understand it, the things in one's own control are supposed to be internal things like judgment, intention, volition..
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