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Re: Stoic design principles

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  • fvanderpoel
    ... Hi David, this is from their website and how they think why they are doing this: Stoic Design started out in 2002 in response to a gap in the market
    Message 1 of 12 , May 1, 2009
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      --- In stoics@yahoogroups.com, Dave Kelly <ptypes@...> wrote:
      >
      > What would be Stoic principles or values with regard to architectural
      > and interior design?
      >
      > I've seen the Stoic values of simplicity and frugality mentioned in
      > other contexts. I think harmony should be a core principle. I've also
      > thought that the reality of impermanence of this world should be
      > represented somehow.
      >
      > I found a design company which claims to take their inspiration from
      > Stoicism. How do you think they're doing?
      >
      > http://www.stoic-design.co.uk/about.html
      >
      > http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&um=1&q=+site:www.stoic-design.co.uk+stoic+design
      >
      > Best wishes,
      > Dave
      >
      > --
      > PTypes Personality Types
      > http://www.ptypes.com/

      Hi David, this is from their website and how they think why they are doing this:

      "Stoic Design started out in 2002 in response to a gap in the market place, for an Interior specialist with a more consultative approach. We chose the Stoics as our namesakes as their beliefs and doctrines are close to some of the ideals we aspire to;

      "When considering the doctrines of the Stoics, it is important to remember that they think of philosophy not as an interesting pastime or even a particular body of knowledge, but as a way of life. They define philosophy as a kind of practice or exercise in the expertise concerning what is beneficial. Once we come to know what we and the world around us are really like, and especially the nature of value, we will be utterly transformed".

      The Stoic ethic espouses a deterministic perspective; in regards to those who lack Stoic virtue, Cleanthes once opined that the wicked man is "like a dog tied to a cart, and compelled to go wherever it goes". A Stoic of virtue, by contrast, would amend his will to suit the world and remain, in the words of Epictetus, "sick and yet happy, in peril and yet happy, dying and yet happy, in exile and happy, in disgrace and happy," thus positing a "completely autonomous" individual will, and at the same time a universe that is "a rigidly deterministic single whole".

      To me this is just marketing drivel.
      If it looks like any style, I say it is Bauhaus,

      fred
    • Dave Kelly
      Hmmm, Bauhaus seems to fit my criteria of simplicity and frugality, and Kevin s of functionality. Modernism, at the moment, seems counter-cultural and
      Message 2 of 12 , May 1, 2009
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        Hmmm, Bauhaus seems to fit my criteria of simplicity and frugality,
        and Kevin's of functionality. Modernism, at the moment, seems
        counter-cultural and relatively conservative. It contrasts well, I
        think, with the emotionalism of postmodernism.

        "The Bauhaus Design showed a simplicity with emphasis on straight
        edges and smooth, slim forms. The rooms were sparsely furnished, but
        filled with hygienic freshness. Superfluous features were taboo.
        Shining steel was discovered as a material for furniture. The aim was
        to take advantage of the possibilities of mass production to achieve a
        style of design that was both functional and aesthetic. Objects were
        to be designed to have "simplicity, multiplicity, economical use of
        space, material, time and money which looks as modern as anything in
        production today."

        http://www.dezignare.com/newsletter/bauhaus.html

        Thanks for the clue, Fred.

        http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&um=1&sa=1&q=bauhaus+simplicity&btnG=Search+Images&aq=f&oq=

        Best wishes,
        Dave




        On Fri, May 1, 2009 at 2:24 AM, fvanderpoel <fvanderpoel@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > --- In stoics@yahoogroups.com, Dave Kelly <ptypes@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> What would be Stoic principles or values with regard to architectural
        >> and interior design?
        >>
        >> I've seen the Stoic values of simplicity and frugality mentioned in
        >> other contexts. I think harmony should be a core principle. I've also
        >> thought that the reality of impermanence of this world should be
        >> represented somehow.
        >>
        >> I found a design company which claims to take their inspiration from
        >> Stoicism. How do you think they're doing?
        >>
        >> http://www.stoic-design.co.uk/about.html
        >>
        >>
        >> http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&um=1&q=+site:www.stoic-design.co.uk+stoic+design
        >>
        >> Best wishes,
        >> Dave
        >>
        >> --
        >> PTypes Personality Types
        >> http://www.ptypes.com/
        >
        > Hi David, this is from their website and how they think why they are doing
        > this:
        >
        > "Stoic Design started out in 2002 in response to a gap in the market place,
        > for an Interior specialist with a more consultative approach. We chose the
        > Stoics as our namesakes as their beliefs and doctrines are close to some of
        > the ideals we aspire to;
        >
        > "When considering the doctrines of the Stoics, it is important to remember
        > that they think of philosophy not as an interesting pastime or even a
        > particular body of knowledge, but as a way of life. They define philosophy
        > as a kind of practice or exercise in the expertise concerning what is
        > beneficial. Once we come to know what we and the world around us are really
        > like, and especially the nature of value, we will be utterly transformed".
        >
        > The Stoic ethic espouses a deterministic perspective; in regards to those
        > who lack Stoic virtue, Cleanthes once opined that the wicked man is "like a
        > dog tied to a cart, and compelled to go wherever it goes". A Stoic of
        > virtue, by contrast, would amend his will to suit the world and remain, in
        > the words of Epictetus, "sick and yet happy, in peril and yet happy, dying
        > and yet happy, in exile and happy, in disgrace and happy," thus positing a
        > "completely autonomous" individual will, and at the same time a universe
        > that is "a rigidly deterministic single whole".
        >
        > To me this is just marketing drivel.
        > If it looks like any style, I say it is Bauhaus,
        >
        > fred
        >
        >



        --
        PTypes Personality Types
        http://www.ptypes.com/
      • murrell91910
        Dave Kelly wrote:
        Message 3 of 12 , May 1, 2009
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          Dave Kelly <ptypes@> wrote:
          << What would be Stoic principles or values with regard
          to architectural and interior design?...I've seen the Stoic
          values of simplicity and frugality mentioned in other contexts.
          I think harmony should be a core principle. >>

          Almost ten years back my sister and I bought an old
          Craftsman bungalow--and, no, not the Sears & Roebuck
          kind, but rather an original Greene & Greene design.
          After we restored this little beauty and enhanced the
          landscaping, I finally had some time to read more
          about the Craftsman homes as well as about the Arts
          and Crafts Era, of which Greene and Greene were all
          about. They were in good company, with the likes of
          Frank Lloyd Wright for example.

          Evidently the Craftsman houses were the antithesis of
          the dominant Victorian houses at the turn of the 20th
          century. Greene & Greene built their new designs to
          correspond with Nature, to open their houses through
          windows, porches, patios allowing the land, the trees,
          the air to flow-in--as if the house and Nature were all
          one, so to speak. Compared to the willy-nilly of the
          Victorian houses, the Craftsman was the epitome of
          "simplicity and frugality;"

          Our Craftsman bungalow, too, is built from beautiful
          natural materials--redwood and river stone.

          I start my days, literally open to a tropical paradise
          come into our den whilst reading the morning paper.
          And the sun dances amongst the branches of a huge
          jacaranda tree as I watch swaying palms. It's Nature
          at its best, and the Craftsman brings it all seemingly
          inside.

          So, maybe a stretch, but I smile when I think of that
          Stoic mandate "Live according to Nature." The
          Craftsman accomodates. :-)

          Cheers,
          --Beatrix
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