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new study of classical philosophy

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  • Jan Garrett
    I d like to call a new book (well, new in English) to the attention of Forum members. It is Greek Thought: A Guide to Classical Knowledge, eds. Jacques
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 5, 2001
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      I'd like to call a new book (well, new in English) to the attention of Forum members. It is Greek Thought: A Guide to Classical Knowledge, eds. Jacques Bruschwig and G.E.R. Lloyd.  It is published by Harvard University Press (2000). In hardbound it is more than $50--which is not bad for a hardbound book these days--and it is a thick substantial volume. (I have not heard about the publication of a softcover version but I would guess there will be one in a year or so.) Folks doing scholarship or a significant amount of teaching related to ancient Greek and Hellenistic philosophy will think seriously about acquiring it. It is also accessible to the generally educated student of philosophy and classical civilization.

      One of the things noteworthy about this book is the collaboration of Italian and French contributors (whose contributions have been translated for this volume). There are important contributions by Anglophone scholars but they do not dominate the book.

      The book is divided into five sections, Philosophy, Politics, Pursuit of Knowledge, Major Figures, Currents of Thought. Articles related directly to Stoicism and the Stoic school include Malcolm Schofield's "The Sage and Politics" in the Politics section, Maurice Caveing's "Zeno" in the Major Figures section, and Jacques Brunschwig's "Stoicism" in the Currents of Thought section. I have read the Schofield article and most of Brunschwig's on "Stoicism," both of which are excellent and thought-provoking. There are also important articles by major francophone Aristotle scholars, Pierre Pellegrin ("Aristotle" in the major figures section) and Richard Bodeus (whose title is something like "Statesman as Political Actor" and which occurs in the Politics section).

      If several of us could read the Bruschwig article on "Stoicism," it might be worth our while to discuss parts of it in this forum. Time permitting (and it may not!) I will try to paraphrase or copy some key passages in future postings.

      Have I mentioned here that my translation of a book by the abovementioned Richard Bodeus has been published by State University of New York Press (in paperback as well as hardbound) in 2000? (The title in English is Aristotle and the Theology of the Living Immortals). The main focus is on the ideas of Aristotle and Plato, but there is some discussion of  Stoic theology toward the end of the first chapter. The word "theology" in the title refers to the "god talk" of the poets Hesiod and Homer and not to a "scientific" or rigorously philosophical treatment of the divine such as we start to find in Stoic philosophy (after Aristotle's death).

    • Keith Seddon
      Hello Jan, I d like to call a new book (well, new in English) to the attention of Forum members. It is Greek Thought: A Guide to Classical Knowledge, eds.
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 9, 2001
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        Hello Jan,
        I'd like to call a new book (well, new in English) to the attention of Forum members. It is Greek Thought: A Guide to Classical Knowledge, eds. Jacques Bruschwig and G.E.R. Lloyd. 

        If several of us could read the Bruschwig article on "Stoicism," it might be worth our while to discuss parts of it in this forum. Time permitting (and it may not!) I will try to paraphrase or copy some key passages in future postings.

        This sounds like a good idea. I did not know about this book, which I have just ordered, so many thanks for your post.
         
        Best wishes,
        Live with honour,
         
         
         
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