Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

a Stoic paradox

Expand Messages
  • Thomas
    An interesting potential paradox in Stoicism that I found it Martha Nussbaum s The Therapy of Desire P.359. It goes like this: The only thing that can make
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 5, 2000
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      An interesting potential paradox in Stoicism that I found it Martha
      Nussbaum's "The Therapy of Desire" P.359. It goes like this: The only thing
      that can make one truly happy (eudaimonia) is to become virtuous. Virtue is
      so special because it does not depend on externals (money, friends) that are
      beyond our control. But virtue is not acquired gradually, only a sage has
      it. .
      Martha Nussbaum writes:
      "For since the Stoics, beginning at least with Chrisyppus, did not claim to
      be wise men, for which decent effort alone is not sufficient, they might
      appear to be placing this most important matter in the control of forces
      beyond the agent."

      So only the quest for virtue is under our control, but attaining virtue
      itself is beyond our control. So why pursue something likely to be beyond
      our control? Does someone see a solution to this puzzling paradox?
      Hello from
      Thomas
      _________________
      Colamus humanitatem
      Let us cultivate humanity - Seneca
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.