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Re: [stoics] obsequiousness

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  • peter
    Amos wrote: . . . Steve (a kind of de facto moderator) . . . I never read anything that said he was a moderator - de facto or otherwise - please tell me it
    Message 1 of 51 , Jul 1, 2007
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      Amos wrote:

       

      “. . . Steve (a kind of de facto moderator) . . .”

       

      I never read anything that said he was a moderator – de facto or otherwise – please tell me it isn’t true!

       

      “Keith hasn't even offered to give me any of his books free of charge.”

       

      Keith, if you’re reading this . . !

       

      “ For instance, I read today that supermarket cashiers in Santiago now wear diapers because their bosses don't allow them breaks to go to the bathroom. That is an abuse of power.”

       

      Or is it more of Amos’ humour?

       

      Regards,

       

      Peter

       

    • Amos
      Peter: I ve been a vegetarian for about 10 years myself. Sometimes things that are too close to us irritate us more than things that we have no contact with,
      Message 51 of 51 , Jul 4, 2007
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        Peter: I've been a vegetarian for about 10 years myself.
        Sometimes things that are too close to us irritate us more than
        things that we have no contact with, because of the many
        associations involved. I can see that you associate Scruton with
        the whole English class system which you loathe, and which I know
        little about, although the Chilean class system is horrid too. I
        imagine that it would be difficult to explain to you why Neruda, as
        a person, irritates me, even though I recognize his poetic
        talent. Be well, Amos




        --- In stoics@yahoogroups.com, "peter" <phrygianslave@...> wrote:
        >
        > Amos wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > "When I ran across Scruton's book, Modern Philosophy, the
        > book that Gish recommends, in the British Council Library about 8
        > years ago, I had no idea who Scruton is. I glanced at the
        > book, it looked worth reading, and I read it. I found it to be
        > excellent, a worthy successor on some levels to Russell's History
        > of Western Philosophy. There's nothing in the book about fox
        > hunting, and I believe that Scruton, in spite of his political
        > conservatism, explains Marx and Rawls quite well, while Russell's
        > anti-Marxism blinds him to Marx's merits. So you can't tell a
        > book by its cover, as they say."
        >
        >
        >
        > Peter responds:
        >
        >
        >
        > Amos, I wasn't attacking you I was merely drawing forum members'
        attention to the fact that this man is a self-seeking publicity
        merchant who makes an ostentatious display of his hunt activities.
        >
        >
        >
        > Hunting is not a sport but a bloody and brutal pastime for a
        coterie of English society. It has a great deal to do with the
        outmoded English class system at its worst - and if Blair did one
        good thing in his time as Prime Minister it was to attempt to end
        this bloody cruel 'sport,' (which term as I say is a misnomer,) once
        and for all.
        >
        >
        >
        > As Cicero says, ". . . what entertainment can possibly arise to an
        elegant and humanised mind, from seeing a noble beast struck to the
        heart by its merciless hunter . . ."?
        >
        >
        >
        > Thomas More the writer of Utopia amongst many others, (Thoreau
        springs to mind,) condemned this barbaric practise.
        >
        >
        >
        > Scruton has tried to justify hunting, indeed, he is one of the main
        spokespersons for the largely lowbrow group of socialite toffs who
        indulge in this activity. By the way, these people are another group
        who love to dress up; this time they appear on horseback in their
        riding pinks, brandishing hunting whips, shouting, "Tally Ho!" to one
        another as the pack of hounds bays for blood.
        >
        >
        >
        > On ethical principle I would not read anything written by Scruton.
        To tell you the truth, I never reckoned much to Russell's History of
        Western Philosophy either. I owned a copy at one time but found so
        much to take exception to in its pages that I threw it away in
        exasperation at the man.
        >
        >
        >
        > With a few courses in philosophy under his belt and a reasonable
        command of English (or his native tongue) any man can write a chapter
        or two or a book for that matter on Marx (or whoever.)
        >
        >
        >
        > I am a very discerning and critical reader as you probably gather.
        You mentioned John Donne recently: now there's a giant of a thinker
        compared with which Scruton is really only a flash in the proverbial
        pan! OK you may call me arrogant and ask me how I can say these
        things when I have not even read his book. But I have heard him
        speaking a couple of times on the radio: that was enough. After sixty
        years on this planet, you know as well as I do, Amos, you get to be
        able to make pretty accurate judgements as to what's what.
        >
        >
        >
        > All the best to you!
        >
        >
        >
        > Peter
        >
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