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Re: TOLSTOICISM

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  • phrygianslave
    Hi Amos! Thanks for that! I couldn t quite recall the words. Thanks for the Eliot too! He s essential reading. And as for, And Did Those Feet . . . – are
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 1, 2007
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      Hi Amos!

      Thanks for that! I couldn't quite recall the words.

      Thanks for the Eliot too! He's essential reading.

      And as for, "And Did Those Feet . . ." – are you an ex-pat
      Englishman? We used to sing that in school assembly at least twice a
      year! Surely you're not striding the streets of Santiago singing
      of, "the holy Lamb of God in England's pleasant pastures seen"?

      I don't know this poem of Yeats. I'll have to look it up.

      All the very best to you Amos!

      Peter









      --- In stoics@yahoogroups.com, "Amos" <vivepablo@...> wrote:
      >
      > Amos: I don't feel up to arguing with you either. Here's part
      of
      > the Blake poem you mention:
      >
      > I wander thro each chartered street,
      > Near where the chartered Thames does flow.
      > And mark in every face I meet
      > Marks of weakness, marks of woe.
      >
      > That reminds me of some similar lines from Eliot's Wasteland:
      >
      > Unreal city,
      > Under the brown fog of a winter dawn,
      > A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many,
      > I had not thought that death had undone so many,
      > Sighs, short and infrequent, were exhaled,
      > And each man fixed his eyes before his feet.
      >
      > Blake's "And Did Those Feet in Ancient Time" is also worth
      rereading
      > as is Yeat's "Why Should Not Old Men Be Mad?" All my best, Amos
      >
    • Amos
      Peter: No, I never sang And Did Those Feet... . I just recommended it because I found it on the page after the first Blake poem in a poetry anthology a
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 1, 2007
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        Peter: No, I never sang "And Did Those Feet...". I just
        recommended it because I found it on the page after the first Blake
        poem in a poetry anthology a girl friend left me. It pays off in
        life to have girl friends with intellectual pretenses without the
        slightest intellectual interest because they generally leave you
        their books when they split. Since you are a God seeker, a much
        rarer breed of man than is commonly thought, I recommend
        Eliot's "Little Gidding", perhaps the finest God seeking poem in
        the English language. I don't agree with your theory of history,
        but it's better to share poetry than to argue. My sister always
        quotes the writer Grace Paley: I never argue when there's a genuine
        disagreement. Be well, Amos



        --- In stoics@yahoogroups.com, "phrygianslave" <phrygianslave@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hi Amos!
        >
        > Thanks for that! I couldn't quite recall the words.
        >
        > Thanks for the Eliot too! He's essential reading.
        >
        > And as for, "And Did Those Feet . . ." – are you an ex-pat
        > Englishman? We used to sing that in school assembly at least twice
        a
        > year! Surely you're not striding the streets of Santiago singing
        > of, "the holy Lamb of God in England's pleasant pastures seen"?
        >
        > I don't know this poem of Yeats. I'll have to look it up.
        >
        > All the very best to you Amos!
        >
        > Peter
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In stoics@yahoogroups.com, "Amos" <vivepablo@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Amos: I don't feel up to arguing with you either. Here's
        part
        > of
        > > the Blake poem you mention:
        > >
        > > I wander thro each chartered street,
        > > Near where the chartered Thames does flow.
        > > And mark in every face I meet
        > > Marks of weakness, marks of woe.
        > >
        > > That reminds me of some similar lines from Eliot's Wasteland:
        > >
        > > Unreal city,
        > > Under the brown fog of a winter dawn,
        > > A crowd flowed over London Bridge, so many,
        > > I had not thought that death had undone so many,
        > > Sighs, short and infrequent, were exhaled,
        > > And each man fixed his eyes before his feet.
        > >
        > > Blake's "And Did Those Feet in Ancient Time" is also worth
        > rereading
        > > as is Yeat's "Why Should Not Old Men Be Mad?" All my best,
        Amos
        > >
        >
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