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Algol

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  • mmorrell1
    Dear Forum members, Last night I stepped outside and did a little star gazing before turning in. The night was cloudless, but the sky was not completely
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 24, 2002
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      Dear Forum members,

      Last night I stepped outside and did a little star gazing before
      turning in. The night was cloudless, but the sky was not completely
      clear; a brisk spring shower had previously rolled over Kansas,
      leaving a faint, opaque haze near the horizon. With a glass of ice
      tea in one hand, and a pair of binoculars covering my eyes, my
      magnified trajectory of consciousness fell upon the eclipsing binary
      star, Algol (or Beta Persei), hovering in the constellation Perseus.
      My eyes told me it was a harmless pin-point of light suspended in
      outerspace, moreover a thing of beauty, that totally contradicted its
      evil reputation, and I gazed at it admiring its subtle blue-tint
      wavering in the haze.

      There are other "winking" stars in the cosmos, some visible
      to the naked eye, yet no star is maligned as Algol is maligned.
      Homer called it "a ghastly sight, deformed and dreadful, and a
      sight
      of woe." To Medieval Arabian astronomers, the term for Algol was
      Al
      Ra's al Ghul, meaning "The Demon's Head." Every 2.37
      days Algol mysteriously dims from a 2.1 magnitude brightness down to
      a 3.4, thus Algol seemed to blink, and was called a "winking
      demon."
      In fact, it is eclipsing.

      Algol is not one star, but two co-orbiting stars making up a binary
      system consisting in a blue, spectral class B8 (Algol 1) and a
      larger, older, but less bright K2 giant (Algol 2). Arabian armies
      made it a point to delay important battles until the star regained
      its brightness, because ill-fortune was thought to befall men during
      the eclipse, which lasts nearly ten hours. The eclipse occurs when
      Algol 2 orbits into the line of sight between Earth and Algol 1;
      then, from our reference point, the star dims into the orange-tinted
      shade of the K2 giant. The space between the K2 & the B8 is 10.4
      km., although a large space by human standards, close enough so where
      the decaying K2 giant is locked into an elliptical orbit and unable
      to escape the "sucking" gravitational field exerted by the
      B8. Connecting them is a Roche Lobe, which is a kind of cosmic
      umbilical cord. Through it flows hot, gaseous accretions that are
      stripped from Algol 2 and devoured by the young, vampiristic blue
      star absorbing the death and dying essence radiating from the K2
      giant, which is lessening in mass every moment that its gaseous
      accretions spill over into the Roche lobe, essentially feeding the
      ghoulish accumulating mass building up in Algol 1. There is a belief
      held by some in the occult: that ancient priest-astronomers were
      Initiates capable of immersing themselves psychologically inside the
      inner workings of a star, could pierce Algol spiritually by merely
      gazing at it, feel himself involved soulfully within its interacting
      forces. Deep in trance, and fully immersed in a vivid dream-life,
      the universe unravels itself symbolically like a great tableau of
      hieroglyphic images. The stars, thus seen, are no longer points of
      light. The myth-saturated Egypto-Chaldean man presents us with just
      such a Universe where stars were gods personified.

      Hallucinations, perhaps? Then consider the pictures with which
      cultures, the world over, use to represent Algol. They show an
      amazing uniformity. Greek star charts, for example, show Algol as a
      head writhing with lives snake, a head belonging to Medusa (a wicked
      Greek goddess) whose bluish white eyes, when looked upon, crystallize
      men into stone figures. For the Hebrew's, Algol was Rosh ha
      Satan, "the Head of Satan." The Chinese simply thought it
      was a thing of disgust. They gave Algol the macabre title Tseih She,
      "the Piled up Corpses." Either ancient man was uniformly
      schizophrenic and hallucinating `gods in stars,' or we are
      dealing
      with a mode of perception that modern man does not understand, or has
      somehow lost and now deigns false.

      May the First Cause be with you,
      MMORRELL
    • DRStarman2001@aol.com
      ... There is a belief held by some in the occult: that ancient priest-astronomers were Initiates capable of immersing themselves psychologically inside the
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 25, 2002
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        tma4cbt@... writes:
        > There are other "winking" stars in the cosmos, some visible
        > to the naked eye, yet no star is maligned as Algol is maligned. Homer called it "a ghastly sight, deformed and dreadful, and a sight of woe." To Medieval Arabian astronomers, the term for Algol was Al Ra's al Ghul, meaning "The Demon's Head." Every 2.37 days Algol mysteriously dims from a 2.1 magnitude brightness down to a 3.4, thus Algol seemed to blink, and was called a "winking demon." In fact, it is eclipsing. Algol is not one star, but two co-orbiting stars making up a binary system consisting in a blue, spectral class B8 (Algol 1) and a larger, older, but less bright K2 giant (Algol 2). Arabian armies made it a point to delay important battles until the star regained its brightness, because ill-fortune was thought to befall men during the eclipse, which lasts nearly ten hours. The eclipse occurs when Algol 2 orbits into the line of sight between Earth and Algol 1; then, from our reference point, the star dims into the orange-tinted shade of the K2 giant. The space between the K2 & the B8 is 10.4 km., although a large space by human standards, close enough so where the decaying K2 giant is locked into an elliptical orbit and unable to escape the "sucking" gravitational field exerted by the B8. Connecting them is a Roche Lobe, which is a kind of cosmic umbilical cord. Through it flows hot, gaseous accretions that are stripped from Algol 2 and devoured by the young, vampiristic blue star absorbing the death and dying essence radiating from the K2 giant, which is lessening in mass every moment that its gaseous accretions spill over into the Roche lobe, essentially feeding the ghoulish accumulating mass building up in Algol 1.
        There is a belief held by some in the occult: that ancient priest-astronomers were Initiates capable of immersing themselves psychologically inside the inner workings of a star, could pierce Algol spiritually by merely gazing at it, feel himself involved soulfully within its interacting
        > forces. Deep in trance, and fully immersed in a vivid dream-life, the universe unravels itself symbolically like a great tableau of hieroglyphic images. The stars, thus seen, are no longer points of light. The myth-saturated Egypto-Chaldean man presents us with just such a Universe where stars were gods personified.
        > Hallucinations, perhaps? Then consider the pictures with which cultures, the world over, use to represent Algol. They show an amazing uniformity. Greek star charts, for example, show Algol as a head writhing with lives snake, a head belonging to Medusa (a wicked Greek goddess) whose bluish white eyes, when looked upon, crystallize men into stone figures. For the Hebrew's, Algol was Rosh ha Satan, "the Head of Satan." The Chinese simply thought it was a thing of disgust. They gave Algol the macabre title Tseih She,
        > "the Piled up Corpses." Either ancient man was uniformly
        > schizophrenic and hallucinating `gods in stars,' or we are
        > dealing with a mode of perception that modern man does not
        > understand, or has somehow lost and now deigns false.
        > May the First Cause be with you,
        > MMORRELL

        *******If you work with the states of existence described in Occult Science, and then look at the findings of Astronomy in that light, binary stars can be seen to be in the 'Moon' state---and this is that in which the Fall of Man occurred. Hence their evil reputation.

        Dr. Starman
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