Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

The Human Will

Expand Messages
  • DRStarman2001@aol.com
    Now at last we get into the question of our will and how it works. DRSteiner in Ch. 8 writes:
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 1, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Now at last we get into the question of our will and how it works.

      DRSteiner in Ch. 8 writes:

      << The human organism is the foundation of the "I-consciousness." It is also
      the
      source of will-activity. It follows from the preceding explanation that an
      insight into the connection between thinking, conscious I, and will activity
      can only be obtained if we first observe how will-activity issues from the
      human organism.

      The factors to be considered in a particular act of will are the MOTIVE
      and
      the DRIVING FORCE. The motive is either a concept or a representation; the
      driving force is the will element and is directly conditioned by the human
      organism. The conceptual factor, or motive, is the momentary source from
      which the will is determined; the driving force is the permanent source of
      determination in the individual. A motive of will may be a pure concept or a
      concept with a definite reference to what is perceived, i.e. a
      representation. General and individual concepts (representations) become
      motives of will by influencing the human individual and determine him to act
      in a particular direction. But one and the same concept, or one and the same
      representation, influences different individuals differently. It impels
      different people to different actions. Will, therefore, does not come about
      merely as a result of the concept, or representation, but also through the
      individual disposition of human beings. This individual disposition we will
      call-in this respect one can follow Eduard von Hartmann -the
      characterological disposition. The way in which concepts and representations
      influence the characterological disposition of a person gives his life a
      definite moral or ethical stamp.
      The characterological disposition is formed through the more or less constant
      life-content of our subject, that is, through the content of our
      representations and feelings. Whether a present representation stimulates me
      to will or not, depends on how the representation is related to the content
      of the rest of my representations, and also to my particular feelings. The
      content of my representations is determined in turn by all those concepts
      which in the course of my individual life have come into contact with
      perceptions, that is, have become representations. This again depends on my
      greater or lesser capacity for intuition, and on the range of my
      observations, that is, on the subjective and the objective factors of
      experience, on my inner determination and my place in life. The
      characterological disposition is more particularly determined by the life of
      feeling. Whether I make a definite representation or concept the motive of my
      action will depend on whether it gives me pleasure or pain. -These are the
      elements which come into consideration in an act of will. The immediately
      present representation or concept which becomes motive, determines the aim,
      the purpose of my will; my characterological disposition determines me to
      direct my activity toward this aim. The representation, to go for a walk in
      the next half-hour, determines the aim of my action. But this representation
      is elevated to a motive of will only if it meets with a suitable
      characterological disposition, that is, if during my life until now I have
      formed representations concerning the purpose of walking, its value for
      health, and further, if the representation of walking combines in me with a
      feeling of pleasure. We therefore must distinguish: 1) the possible
      subjective dispositions which are suitable for turning definite
      representations and concepts into motives; and 2) the possible
      representations and concepts which are capable of so influencing my
      characterological disposition that willing is the result. The first
      represents the driving force, the second, the aims of morality. >>

      *******So in willing any action, there is the thing we take as the momentary
      motive for doing it, which can be an idea, an image, a feeling, or what not.
      Then deeper than that is our characterological make-up which inclines us to
      favorably respond to one image or another, our "temperament."

      Starman
    • Carol
      ... Dr. Starman, here I go looking for examples again (In Steiner s next incarnation he ll have to rewrite the book for dummies and gives lots of examples
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 1, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Dr. Starman wrote:
        >
        > *******So in willing any action, there is the thing we take
        > as the momentary
        > motive for doing it, which can be an idea, an image, a
        > feeling, or what not.
        > Then deeper than that is our characterological make-up
        > which inclines us to
        > favorably respond to one image or another, our
        > "temperament."
        >


        Dr. Starman, here I go looking for examples again (In
        Steiner's next incarnation he'll have to rewrite the book
        'for dummies' and gives lots of examples for people like me)

        So, Dr. Starman, or anybody else willing, I'm sure you know
        all about the daily will exercise in which we pick an
        arbitrary action and do it day after day. Could you take me
        slow motion through one of these (say, bending down and
        touching the floor three times everyday at noon)using the
        concepts of 'representation', 'motive', 'characterlogical
        disposition'...? Thanks...

        Carol


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Send your FREE holiday greetings online!
        http://greetings.yahoo.com
      • Carol
        Do you think it is fair to say that we can not intuit representations, only concepts, so that representations are always the RESULTS of intuitions? Carol
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 1, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Do you think it is fair to say that we can not intuit
          representations, only concepts, so that representations are
          always the RESULTS of intuitions?

          Carol




          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Send your FREE holiday greetings online!
          http://greetings.yahoo.com
        • DRStarman2001@aol.com
          ... momentary ... not. ... Dr. Starman, here I go looking for examples again (In Steiner s next incarnation he ll have to rewrite the book for dummies and
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 2, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            Dr. Starman wrote:
            > *******So in willing any action, there is the thing we take as the
            momentary
            > motive for doing it, which can be an idea, an image, a feeling, or what
            not.
            > Then deeper than that is our characterological make-up which inclines us to
            > favorably respond to one image or another, our "temperament."


            Dr. Starman, here I go looking for examples again (In Steiner's next
            incarnation he'll have to rewrite the book 'for dummies' and gives lots of
            examples for people like me) So, Dr. Starman, or anybody else willing, I'm
            sure you know all about the daily will exercise in which we pick an arbitrary
            action and do it day after day. Could you take me slow motion through one of
            these (say, bending down and touching the floor three times everyday at
            noon)using the concepts of 'representation', 'motive', 'characterlogical
            disposition'...? Thanks...
            Carol >>

            *******Hey, 'Anthroposophy For Dummies' isn't a bad idea at all. We're
            supposed to stay humble, and from my experience we all could do with reading
            such a book! (But there already is an anthroposophy for dummies in the
            lectures to the workmen.)

            Well, if you make a picture to yourself of doing an exercise---say,
            meditating at noon or exercising with a dumbbell at 3 or whatever---that's
            the mental image or representation you're making: which you make your MOTIVE
            when you take that image as a reason to ACT.
            What type of action you'll choose will be influenced by your
            disposition---so if you're an active person you'll more likely choose an
            exercise like your example, or lifting weights in mine; while if your
            temperament inclines you more to passivity then you might more easily choose
            meditating as something to do.
            Also the phlegmatic temperament willl find it easier to do something at
            the same time each day, where it will be harder for, for instance, the
            sanguines.

            Starman
          • DRStarman2001@aol.com
            In a message dated 1/2/2002 1:21:24 AM, softabyss@yahoo.com writes:
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 2, 2002
            • 0 Attachment
              In a message dated 1/2/2002 1:21:24 AM, softabyss@... writes:

              << Do you think it is fair to say that we can not intuit
              representations, only concepts, so that representations are
              always the RESULTS of intuitions?

              Carol >>

              *******I'd say absolutely. We draw concepts from the ideal world by
              'intuition', Steiner writes. 'Representations' or mental images we make by
              connecting these concepts we've drawn by intuition TO perceptions the body
              gives us. A representation or 'thought-image' (as opposed to actual
              thinking) is, better put, the RESULT of a concept being connected to a
              perception (or many perceptions). It's a middle entity between concept and
              perception.

              Starman
            • Carol
              Well, I see that there is a new book out called Rudolf Steiner for Beginners ... And thanks for the examples; they helped me make some clearer distinctions.
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 2, 2002
              • 0 Attachment
                Well, I see that there is a new book out called "Rudolf
                Steiner for Beginners"...

                And thanks for the examples; they helped me make some clearer
                distinctions.

                Carol
                >
                > *******Hey, 'Anthroposophy For Dummies' isn't a bad idea at
                > all. We're
                > supposed to stay humble, and from my experience we all
                > could do with reading
                > such a book! (But there already is an anthroposophy for
                > dummies in the
                > lectures to the workmen.)
                >
                > Well, if you make a picture to yourself of doing an
                > exercise---say,
                > meditating at noon or exercising with a dumbbell at 3 or
                > whatever---that's
                > the mental image or representation you're making: which you
                > make your MOTIVE
                > when you take that image as a reason to ACT.
                > What type of action you'll choose will be influenced by
                > your
                > disposition---so if you're an active person you'll more
                > likely choose an
                > exercise like your example, or lifting weights in mine;
                > while if your
                > temperament inclines you more to passivity then you might
                > more easily choose
                > meditating as something to do.
                > Also the phlegmatic temperament willl find it easier to
                > do something at
                > the same time each day, where it will be harder for, for
                > instance, the
                > sanguines.
                >
                > Starman
                >


                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Send your FREE holiday greetings online!
                http://greetings.yahoo.com
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.