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The Experiencing of Spirit

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  • DRStarman2001@aol.com
    Dr. Steiner in Ch. 8 writes:
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 1, 2002
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      Dr. Steiner in Ch. 8 writes: << ....thinking can be directly experienced
      as a
      self-contained reality. In order to explain thinking as such, those who find
      it necessary to add something to it, such as physical brain-processes or
      unconscious spiritual processes lying behind the conscious thinking which is
      being observed, underestimate what can be seen when thinking is observed
      without prejudice. During his observation of thinking, the observer lives
      directly within a spiritual, self-sustaining activity of a living reality.
      Indeed one can say that he who wants to grasp the reality of spirit in the
      form in which it first presents itself to man, can do this in his own
      self-sustaining thinking. >>

      *******So we experience the Spirit in thinking. I don't know how much clearer
      it can be.

      Starman
    • Carol
      Yes, it is very clear, but that is not my problem- it s obtaining the experience, or knowing when I am having the experience. I could show those words of
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 1, 2002
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        Yes, it is very clear, but that is not my problem- it's
        obtaining the experience, or knowing when I am having the
        experience. I could show those words of Steiner's to many of
        my friends and they would say, "Hey, I spent all day thinking
        about this or that and I didn't have no spiritual experience"
        or even math teachers who would say the same thing after
        spending intense time concentrating on a math problem. I'm
        not arguing here, just describing my own personal problem.
        In fact, I don't think I can honestly say I've experienced my
        thinking directly in this way, yet the thoughts, as Steiner
        expresses them, I have taken in and they feel very strong to
        me. Strong, but meaningless if I don't let go of them and
        jump into the experience.

        Carol


        --- DRStarman2001@... wrote:
        > Dr. Steiner in Ch. 8 writes: << ....thinking can be
        > directly experienced
        > as a
        > self-contained reality. In order to explain thinking as
        > such, those who find
        > it necessary to add something to it, such as physical
        > brain-processes or
        > unconscious spiritual processes lying behind the conscious
        > thinking which is
        > being observed, underestimate what can be seen when
        > thinking is observed
        > without prejudice. During his observation of thinking, the
        > observer lives
        > directly within a spiritual, self-sustaining activity of a
        > living reality.
        > Indeed one can say that he who wants to grasp the reality
        > of spirit in the
        > form in which it first presents itself to man, can do this
        > in his own
        > self-sustaining thinking. >>
        >
        > *******So we experience the Spirit in thinking. I don't
        > know how much clearer
        > it can be.
        >
        > Starman
        >
        >


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      • DRStarman2001@aol.com
        In a message dated 1/2/2002 1:00:23 AM, softabyss@yahoo.com writes:
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 2, 2002
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          In a message dated 1/2/2002 1:00:23 AM, softabyss@... writes:

          << Yes, it is very clear, but that is not my problem- it's
          obtaining the experience, or knowing when I am having the
          experience. I could show those words of Steiner's to many of
          my friends and they would say, "Hey, I spent all day thinking
          about this or that and I didn't have no spiritual experience"
          or even math teachers who would say the same thing after
          spending intense time concentrating on a math problem. I'm
          not arguing here, just describing my own personal problem.
          In fact, I don't think I can honestly say I've experienced my
          thinking directly in this way, yet the thoughts, as Steiner
          expresses them, I have taken in and they feel very strong to
          me. Strong, but meaningless if I don't let go of them and
          jump into the experience.

          Carol >>

          *******But there's no "other experience" to seek for. Steiner's philosophical
          works were all written to argue that when we think in concepts it is the
          human spirit that is acting and that we are experiencing directly.
          He makes this exact same point again in the first chapter of Theosophy,
          which we'll be taking up next on the RudolfSteiner101 list (and not at this
          quick pace over just12 days!).

          Starman
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