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[steiner] Anthroposophy and Dreams

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  • Seth Miller
    Hello all - I am not a new member to this list, but I am mostly a lurker due to time restrictions (teaching and in grad school). I am presently researching
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 15, 2006
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      Hello all - I am not a new member to this list, but I am mostly a lurker due to time restrictions (teaching and in grad school).  I am presently researching what anthroposophy has to say about dreams... and there is surprisingly little for a subject so closely tied with subjects very well represented in the literature (transformation of consciousness, different states of consciousness, sleep, etc.).
       
      When I compare what little understanding I have of the anthroposophical view of dreams with the variety of more modern dream-theories (Freud, Jung, Perls, Boss, Hall, LaBerge, Grof, etc...), I am struck by what (at a surface level) appears like a very weak or superficial approach to the actual dream content.  This is perhaps in part due to the repetitive examples that Steiner uses when speaking of dream content, such as white picket fences referring to rows of teeth, or slithering snakes referring to the intestines. 
       
      When I examine Steiner's view of dreams in relation to his more general ideas of the transformation of consciousness, he seems to be working in an arena that essentially all of the other above named theorists/practitioners are unable to clearly access.  But in terms of the ability of the other theorists (in their various ways) to deal with the symbolism and relationship of the dream content to the psychological states of the dreamer, Steiner seems to pale in comparison.  Is this just because this aspect is of much less importance for the wider view that Steiner is taking, and/or that he didn't have time to go into these details in the 'middle realm'?
       
      I was wondering if others on this list could give me some insight into the above questions, and into the anthroposophical view of dreams in general.
       
      Thanks!
       
      -Seth Miller


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    • thepathofthesunflower
      ... lurker due to time restrictions (teaching and in grad school). I am presently researching what anthroposophy has to say about dreams... and there is
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 17, 2006
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        --- In steiner@yahoogroups.com, Seth Miller <cadoc1@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello all - I am not a new member to this list, but I am mostly a
        lurker due to time restrictions (teaching and in grad school). I am
        presently researching what anthroposophy has to say about dreams...
        and there is surprisingly little for a subject so closely tied with
        subjects very well represented in the literature (transformation of
        consciousness, different states of consciousness, sleep, etc.).
        >
        > When I compare what little understanding I have of the
        anthroposophical view of dreams with the variety of more modern dream-
        theories (Freud, Jung, Perls, Boss, Hall, LaBerge, Grof, etc...), I
        am struck by what (at a surface level) appears like a very weak or
        superficial approach to the actual dream content. This is perhaps in
        part due to the repetitive examples that Steiner uses when speaking
        of dream content, such as white picket fences referring to rows of
        teeth, or slithering snakes referring to the intestines.
        >
        > When I examine Steiner's view of dreams in relation to his more
        general ideas of the transformation of consciousness, he seems to be
        working in an arena that essentially all of the other above named
        theorists/practitioners are unable to clearly access. But in terms
        of the ability of the other theorists (in their various ways) to deal
        with the symbolism and relationship of the dream content to the
        psychological states of the dreamer, Steiner seems to pale in
        comparison. Is this just because this aspect is of much less
        importance for the wider view that Steiner is taking, and/or that he
        didn't have time to go into these details in the 'middle realm'?
        >
        > I was wondering if others on this list could give me some insight
        into the above questions, and into the anthroposophical view of
        dreams in general.
        >
        > Thanks!
        >
        > -Seth Miller
        >
        >
        >
        >
        ______________________________________________________________________
        ______________
        > Sponsored Link
        >
        > Mortgage rates near 39yr lows.
        > $310k for $999/mo. Calculate new payment!
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        >
        Hi Seth

        My understanding of dreams has come from Dr Steiner, he did grasp
        this subject very well in my opinion. The symbolism in dreams are
        personal to each one and i think the main training of thought from Dr
        Steiner is for one to understand the process or mechanics of dreaming
        in order to work out what the pictures represented mean to oneself.

        It is a vast subject with many different states of dreaming
        involved. I paste a link to Sr Steiner's work on dreaming; if you
        haven't read these works yet.

        http://www.google.com/custom?
        domains=rsarchive.org&q=dreams&sitesearch=rsarchive.org&sa=Search&clie
        nt=pub-6820709641987870&forid=1&channel=7663793394&ie=ISO-8859-
        1&oe=ISO-8859-1&safe=active&cof=GALT%3A%23333333%3BGL%3A1%3BDIV%3A%
        2337352E%3BVLC%3A000000%3BAH%3Acenter%3BBGC%3AFFFFF8%3BLBGC%3ACCCCC0%
        3BALC%3A000000%3BLC%3A000000%3BT%3A44423A%3BGFNT%3A666660%3BGIMP%
        3A333330%3BLH%3A50%3BLW%3A360%3BL%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwn.rsarchive.org%
        2Ficons%2FGoogle%2FRSArc_logoG.gif%3BS%3Ahttp%3A%2F%
        2Fwww.rsarchive.org%2F%3BFORID%3A1%3B&hl=en

        I'll be re-reading this as well and look forward to your comments.

        Regards
        Caryn
      • Nina
        Dear Seth, Where are you for grad school? Did Jungian term paper, Beyond Borders:Exploring the Dream Process With Edgar Cayce (no Steiner due to my limited
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 17, 2006
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          Dear Seth,
          Where are you for grad school?
          Did Jungian term paper,"Beyond Borders:Exploring the Dream Process
          With Edgar Cayce"(no Steiner due to my limited knowledge base)
          Would recommend "JUNG $ STEINER: The Birth of a New Psychology" by
          Gerhard Wehr... not alot about dreams but what said is great. Sorry
          not familiar with other titles. NINA
        • Durward Starman
          ******* I think Steiner de-emphasized dreams because many Theosophists were a bit obsessed with them, and because your dreams that you have before you set out
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 17, 2006
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            ******* I think Steiner de-emphasized dreams because many Theosophists were
            a bit obsessed with them, and because your dreams that you have before you
            set out on the spiritual path are jumbled nonsense compared to what they
            become once you are walking that path. He seems dismissive of them in his
            early writings and lectures for beginners, but read the last chapters of
            Knowledge of the Higher Worlds & Its Attainment: he takes quite a different
            attitude towards them for people who have been doing the exercises that
            transform your astral experience each night.

            Starman

            www.DrStarman.com


            >From: Seth Miller <cadoc1@...>
            >Reply-To: steiner@yahoogroups.com
            >To: steiner@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [steiner] Anthroposophy and Dreams
            >Date: Wed, 15 Nov 2006 21:48:23 -0800 (PST)
            >
            >Hello all - I am not a new member to this list, but I am mostly a lurker
            >due to time restrictions (teaching and in grad school). I am presently
            >researching what anthroposophy has to say about dreams... and there is
            >surprisingly little for a subject so closely tied with subjects very well
            >represented in the literature (transformation of consciousness, different
            >states of consciousness, sleep, etc.).
            >
            >When I compare what little understanding I have of the anthroposophical
            >view of dreams with the variety of more modern dream-theories (Freud, Jung,
            >Perls, Boss, Hall, LaBerge, Grof, etc...), I am struck by what (at a
            >surface level) appears like a very weak or superficial approach to the
            >actual dream content. This is perhaps in part due to the repetitive
            >examples that Steiner uses when speaking of dream content, such as white
            >picket fences referring to rows of teeth, or slithering snakes referring to
            >the intestines.
            >
            >When I examine Steiner's view of dreams in relation to his more general
            >ideas of the transformation of consciousness, he seems to be working in an
            >arena that essentially all of the other above named theorists/practitioners
            >are unable to clearly access. But in terms of the ability of the other
            >theorists (in their various ways) to deal with the symbolism and
            >relationship of the dream content to the psychological states of the
            >dreamer, Steiner seems to pale in comparison. Is this just because this
            >aspect is of much less importance for the wider view that Steiner is
            >taking, and/or that he didn't have time to go into these details in the
            >'middle realm'?
            >
            >I was wondering if others on this list could give me some insight into the
            >above questions, and into the anthroposophical view of dreams in general.
            >
            >Thanks!
            >
            >-Seth Miller

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