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The Chipmunk

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  • Mathew Morrell
    My neighbor, bless her heart, is an avid bird lover. Every day she throws millet, sunflower seeds, corn, directly on the bricks covering her patio and on the
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 30, 2006
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      My neighbor, bless her heart, is an avid bird lover. Every day she
      throws millet, sunflower seeds, corn, directly on the bricks covering
      her patio and on the bare ground next to her front porch. My small,
      cheap condominium butts up straight against hers. So I too get to
      enjoy the plethora of birds chirping all day all over our building
      throughout the year.

      I used to feed the birds, as well, but from feeders---and herein is
      where the problem begins. The pounds of bird feed that my neighbor
      is throwing on the ground is attracting birds, but it is also
      attracting vermin that feed off the ground. Consequently we have a
      rat and mice population where none existed before. Being an animal
      lover, I was all right with that, at first. A mouse here and there
      doesn't bother me.

      It's when the problem escalates into an infestation that I get
      angry. A few days ago I bought a pellet gun at Wal Mart, and had
      every intention in the world of popping the rats that wobbled across
      my patio on their way to the feed trough next door. But as I
      observed my patio, waiting with my pellet gun in hand, I started to
      notice that nature was already at work on the problem. The
      neighborhood chipmunks were fighting the rats! driving them out of
      their boroughs, nipping their buts, in an attempt to defend their
      territory.

      I realized then that nature hates infestations. Infestations of
      anything---rats, insects, even monkeys---is contrary to the balance
      of nature. Infestations are destructive, parasitic manifestations
      that nature attacks through the Life Impulse. Where the life impulse
      is weak, nature does not have time to operate in fear. Its fear must
      turn to action, or else the infestation grows exponentially until it
      destroys the ecosystem.

      Nations are like ecosystems in the sense that they are strongest when
      infestation controls, the "chipmunks" and the "cats" of society, are
      allowed to protect their territory from invasion.


      Mathew Morrell
      www.kcpost.net
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