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Re: [steiner] Crude

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  • John Massengale
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/08/30/AR2005083001 655_pf.html washingtonpost.com In for a Crude Awakening By Mark Hertsgaard, a
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 31, 2005
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      Re: [steiner] Crude http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/08/30/AR2005083001655_pf.html

      washingtonpost.com
      In for a Crude Awakening

      By Mark Hertsgaard,
      a fellow of the Nation Institute and the author of five books, including "Earth Odyssey: Around the World In Search of Our Environmental Future"
      Wednesday, August 31, 2005; C03

      TWILIGHT IN THE DESERT

      The Coming Saudi Oil Shock and the World Economy

      By Matthew R. Simmons

      Wiley. 422 pp. $24.95

      THE LONG EMERGENCY

      Surviving the Converging Catastrophes of the Twenty-First Century

      By James Howard Kunstler

      Atlantic Monthly. 307 pp. $23

      It used to be that only environmentalists and paranoids warned about the world running out of oil and the future it could bring: crashing economies, resource wars, social breakdown, agony at the pump. Not anymore -- and certainly not this summer, with the average national price of a gallon of gasoline somewhere around $2.60 in late August, up 73 cents from last year, and with Hurricane Katrina's aftereffects bound to push prices still higher. A growing number of industry insiders believe that the era of cheap, abundant oil is ending and that governments, corporate elites and ordinary people are utterly unprepared for the challenges ahead.

      Matthew R. Simmons is an investment banker with 30 years of experience advising the industry's major players, including briefing President Bush and Vice President Cheney. How long abundant oil will last, Simmons has asserted, is "the world's biggest serious question." The answers he provides in "Twilight in the Desert" are nothing less than alarming -- all the more so because of his pro-industry sympathies and the prodigious research and fair-minded reasoning he brings to his task.

      Simmons and other petro-pessimists do not suggest that Earth will surrender its last drop of oil anytime soon. Rather, they contend that we are approaching, or beyond, "peak oil" -- the point where half of a given amount of oil has been pumped out and half still remains. That may not sound bad, but history shows that, on a regional basis, that second half is much costlier and less certain to extract; the United States and other post-peak regions have all experienced steep production declines.

      In a world where oil demand sets new records every year, the arrival of peak oil promises to bring more frequent and debilitating shortages, higher and more volatile prices, and a host of other nasty consequences. Think back to the oil shocks and gas lines of the 1970s; then imagine those shocks continuing not for months but decades. That's life in the peak-oil future, Simmons argues, when the suburban lifestyle millions of Americans take for granted will become unsustainable.

      Conventional wisdom, of course, says that the magic of the market will solve the problem: Higher prices will call forth more supply. In particular, Saudi Arabia is assumed to hold virtually inexhaustible reserves -- enough, the Saudis say, to continue the current production rates (8 to 9 million barrels per day) for another 90 years. Simmons demolishes these rosy assumptions.

      He begins by pointing out that there are virtually no independently verifiable data to support the Saudis' claims; essentially, outsiders have been taking their word for it. In a remarkable feat of investigation, Simmons has pieced together his own portrait of the productivity of Saudi oil fields by combing through more than 200 technical papers that engineers from Aramco, the Saudi national oil company, have published over the last 40 years in the journal of the Society of Petroleum Engineers. These papers, Simmons notes, were vetted in advance by Saudi authorities, who presumably assumed that candor was acceptable within such an obscure context.

      The resulting book is a page-turner, in both the positive and negative senses of the term. Like a Tom Clancy novel, "Twilight in the Desert" contains vast stretches of impenetrable technical writing that many readers will skip over. The drama that unfolds along the way, however, will keep them reading to the end. Simmons has assembled a devastatingly convincing case that Saudi Arabia is at or beyond peak. As he points out, Saudi production relies on a few gigantic oil fields; after decades of high production, these fields are exhibiting the normal signs of advanced aging (particularly the need for injections of enormous flows of water to force the remaining oil to the surface); and no new major fields have been found, despite intensive searching. It is therefore unrealistic to expect the Saudi oil miracle to continue even "for another decade or two."

      Simmons doesn't predict exactly when Saudi oil production will decline. But he clearly fears that the world is heading for a crash and implores leaders in government and elsewhere to fast-track the development of a new energy foundation. In fact, he is so worried that, despite being a long-standing Republican, he raises the idea of redistributing revenues of future oil production from corporate to public treasuries to finance the transition. (Note to Simmons: Tell President Bush, please.)

      But it's already too late for such measures, James Howard Kunstler argues in "The Long Emergency." America's dependence on oil is too pervasive to undo quickly, he warns; besides, none of the alternatives (except perhaps nuclear energy) can provide the concentrated amounts of energy required to run our high-tech society, especially when billions of Chinese and other formerly impoverished people are eager to join the party.

      We face the end not only of cheap oil but of cheap fossil fuels in general, asserts Kunstler, a novelist and critic best known for his lacerating attacks on the social and environmental costs of suburbia. Even if we do decide to chart a new course, it is "a dangerous fantasy" to believe that "a smooth, seamless transition from fossil fuels to their putative replacements -- hydrogen, solar power, whatever -- lies just a few years ahead." At best, the shift will take decades. What's more, deploying new energy sources, even green ones, still requires a platform of fossil fuel: To manufacture wind turbines or solar panels takes lots of metal and electricity. In the meantime, we'll have our hands full dealing with another unwelcome consequence of fossil-fuel dependence: the soaring temperatures, rising sea levels and mega-droughts brought by global climate change (a complication all but unmentioned by Simmons).

      Kunstler takes a curmudgeon's delight in ticking off the many extravagances humanity will have to do without in the years ahead. Say goodbye to suburbia, air travel, industrial agriculture (with its reliance on fossil fuels, from planting to harvesting to shipping) and globalization; after all, without fuel, "the cost of transport will no longer be negligible." The future won't be all gloomy, though: "Life will become intensely and increasingly local," he writes, as humans relocate to "towns and small cities surrounded by intensively cultivated agricultural hinterlands."

      Not long ago, a Jeremiah like Kunstler would have been dismissed as a kook. Even now, his unrelenting pessimism about the viability of alternative energy sources and the resourcefulness of the human animal will strike many as extreme. But his book is, alas, as brilliant as it is baleful, and given the revelations of Simmons's detective work, we disregard it at our peril.

      Together, these two books cast a particularly harsh light on the current energy debate in Washington, where lawmakers fulminate against exorbitant gasoline prices and pledge an end to U.S. dependence on foreign oil. If the peak-oil prophets are right, $3 for a gallon of gas will soon sound cheap, and the real imperative is to end our dependence on oil altogether.

      © 2005 The Washington Post Company
    • Hithcalen
      Nuclear seems to be the answer to oil problem. As said Steiner, the more spiritualized the world will be the more nucrear energy production there will be. ...
      Message 2 of 14 , Sep 5, 2005
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        Nuclear seems to be the answer to oil problem. As said Steiner, the more spiritualized the world will be the more nucrear energy production there will be.


        Click here to donate to the Hurricane Katrina relief effort.
      • Mathew Morrell
        ... more spiritualized the world will be the more nucrear energy production there will be. ... Thanks for replying to the subject. I m interested in the topic
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 5, 2005
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          --- In steiner@yahoogroups.com, Hithcalen <hithcalen@y...> wrote:
          > Nuclear seems to be the answer to oil problem. As said Steiner, the
          more spiritualized the world will be the more nucrear energy production
          there will be.
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          Thanks for replying to the subject. I'm interested in the topic of
          nuclear energy, but am curious as to how Steiner could have
          referenced "nuclear energy production" when nuclear energy wasn't
          discovered until the 1930s. His statement was spiritual in nature,
          wasn't it? Or are you telling me he was speaking about the production
          of nuclear energy in terms of energy production (nuclear power plants
          that unleash atomic energy)?

          That would be incredible.
        • DoctorStarman@aol.com
          ... *******Yes, I d sure like to see THAT one. Reminds me of the fellow in Australia who claimed Steiner verified Edgar Cayce s earth changes predictions when
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 5, 2005
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            Hithcalen <hithcalen@y...> wrote:
            >Nuclear seems to be the answer to oil problem. As said Steiner, the
            more spiritualized the world will be the more nucrear energy production
            there will be.
            >
            >   
            >---------------------------------
            Thanks for replying to the subject.  I'm interested in the topic of
            nuclear energy, but am curious as to how Steiner could have
            referenced "nuclear energy production" when nuclear energy wasn't
            discovered until the 1930s.


            *******Yes, I'd sure like to see THAT one. Reminds me of the fellow in Australia who claimed Steiner verified Edgar Cayce's earth changes predictions when Cayce didn't even start making them till after Steiner's death.

            -Starman
            www.DrStarman.com
          • Hithcalen
            I interpret St. in this way. He said, if I remember it well, that the force that will be discover in the near future will be a force of destruction (in
            Message 5 of 14 , Sep 6, 2005
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              I interpret St. in this way. He said, if I remember it well, that the force that will be discover in the near future will be a force of destruction (in relation with etheric) and the more this force will be use the more spirituelized the world will be, cause this force aims to destruct the planet and then to accelerate the the spiritual rising...[I did not find back the the exact quote]
               
              (should be in the science course about UNDER-ETHERIC wolrd, or in the Strader machine GA)

              DoctorStarman@... wrote:

              Hithcalen <hithcalen@y...> wrote:
              >Nuclear seems to be the answer to oil problem. As said Steiner, the
              more spiritualized the world will be the more nucrear energy production
              there will be.
              >
              >   
              >---------------------------------
              Thanks for replying to the subject.  I'm interested in the topic of
              nuclear energy, but am curious as to how Steiner could have
              referenced "nuclear energy production" when nuclear energy wasn't
              discovered until the 1930s.


              *******Yes, I'd sure like to see THAT one. Reminds me of the fellow in Australia who claimed Steiner verified Edgar Cayce's earth changes predictions when Cayce didn't even start making them till after Steiner's death.

              -Starman
              www.DrStarman.com


              Click here to donate to the Hurricane Katrina relief effort.

            • John Massengale
              Is there somewhere online where I can read about what Steiner said about Ahriman¹s actions during our time? Thanks, John Katrina / Ahriman Is there somewhere
              Message 6 of 14 , Sep 6, 2005
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                Katrina / Ahriman Is there somewhere online where I can read about what Steiner said about Ahriman’s actions during our time?

                Thanks,

                John
              • John Massengale
                Did Steiner ever talk about Tesla? Thanks, John
                Message 7 of 14 , Sep 6, 2005
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                  Tesla Did Steiner ever talk about Tesla?

                  Thanks,

                  John
                • Hithcalen
                  By TESLA you mean electromagnetic fields ? If so , yes he seek about that as an under etheric World, or even deeper under-spiritual worlds. Just look at the
                  Message 8 of 14 , Sep 6, 2005
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                    By  TESLA you mean electromagnetic fields ?
                    If so , yes he seek about that as an under etheric World, or even deeper under-spiritual worlds.
                    Just look at the Strader Machine conférence. He also speaks of the structure of Nature (in the initiate point of w) within the volume : "Limits to the knowledge of nature".(I don't know the exact titel in english)

                    Did Steiner ever talk about Tesla?

                    Thanks,

                    John

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                  • Sue
                    Dear John, There are alot of lectures and books at http://wn.rsarchive.org .... you will find much about Ahriman and Lucifer. When you know the nature of
                    Message 9 of 14 , Sep 6, 2005
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                      Dear John,

                      There are alot of lectures and books at
                      http://wn.rsarchive.org .... you will find much about
                      Ahriman and Lucifer. When you know the nature of these
                      beings, you can see them working in our daily lives in
                      the most unsuspecting ways. I hope this helps.

                      Peace and love... Sue.





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                    • LilOleMissy
                      John, to the best of my knowledge, for what it s worth, I don t recall ever encountering Nicole Tesla s name in any of Steiner s lectures, although he,
                      Message 10 of 14 , Sep 6, 2005
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                        John, to the best of my knowledge, for what it's worth, I don't recall ever encountering Nicole Tesla's name in any of Steiner's lectures, although he, Steiner, spoke about electricity very much and from very many perspectives, including The Double. Please don't take my poor recollections as final, though. Tesla's influence turned out to be incredibly enormous, and one wonders what he destroyed as being too dangerous for mankind to have recourse to, or what "mechanism" was available to him to withstand some of his experiments! Years ago I took advantage of visiting Tesla's work in the, if I remember correctly, Lakawanda Power Station over the Niagara River. Old even at that time, it was a marvel of advanced electrical engineering and potential from a materialistic standpoint.  

                        As a sidenote to Sue: Your wise heartfelt words of wisdom regarding art are indeed welcomed enormously as are all your warm comments! Yes, I live in the US near Monterey, California and studied Carl Steggmann's "The Other America" years ago. At the time, he was also heavily involved in deeply spiritual and beautiful watercolors, a display of which I was given the opportunity to view in private [no one else chanced by the studio at the time :)  ]  Carl was, unless I err here, a CC Priest and very deeply loved as was Mrs. Steggmenn, both of whom had much to do with the creation of R.S. College in Fair Oaks, California, which is a section, so to say, of Sacramento, 200 miles NNE of me.  

                        Now it's off to duties I haven't found a way to squeak out of! ACK!

                        Blessings,

                        Sheila

                        On Sep 6, 2005, at 8:25 AM, John Massengale wrote:

                        Did Steiner ever talk about Tesla?

                        Thanks,

                        John

                      • Pierre Gringoire
                        Tesla Did Steiner ever talk about Tesla? I m not sure whether Steiner spoke about Tesla directly. He did however speak about a form of energy which has been
                        Message 11 of 14 , Sep 6, 2005
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                          Tesla
                          > Did Steiner ever talk about Tesla?

                              I'm not sure whether Steiner spoke about Tesla directly.  He did however speak about a form of energy which has been associated with Tesla's name.  This form of energy is sometimes referred to as 'Vril', after the name given to it by Edward Bulwer-Lytton.  Bulwer-Lytton's novel of the same name appeared in 1871, and was, I believe, the first public mention of this form of power.  The novel is a bit flat, but includes indications of both the capability of the power and the means by which is can be made manifest.  In the novel, 'Vril' powers generators and automatons by means of energy coming from members of a developed race of beings.

                              Although the idea was presented in novel form, there were many, including Steiner, who regarded it as no mere fantasy.  Blavatsky was aware of 'Vril', and mentions it in 'Isis Unveiled'.  C. G. Harrison also spoke about it in 'The Transcendental Universe', although with great reservation.  His view was that the release of this force would be a curse rather than a blessing for mankind.  It would constitute, he said:

                              "...placing in the hands of the rich a power which would enable them to dispense with nine-tenths of the labour which at present ministers to their wants, and, at the same time, provide them with the means of instantly crushing any hostile demonstration on the part of the unemployed majority, who would then be entirely at their mercy.  Such a power in the hands of a few individuals would inaugurate a state of things too appalling to contemplate." (p82)

                              There is little doubt he was referring to the same power outlined in Bulwer-Lytton's novel.  This is not nuclear power, but one based on an understanding of the etheric.  There are some who think that John Worrell Keely was a pioneer of this form of power.  Others claim that Tesla was also experimenting with it.  Much of Tesla's work was based on the energy that can be gleaned from oscillations (neon lighting, for example).  Tesla is also credited with inventing robots.  He was aware of the Bulwer-Lytton novel but denied he had been inspired by it.  Some think Tesla's work went far beyond this, with disastrous results (see ' Tunguska').

                              Steiner spoke about this form of energy in the series of lectures entitled 'The Challenge of the Times', in connection with certain secret societies and their influence in the West:

                              "Every knowing member of these secret circles is aware that, solely by means of certain capacities that are still latent but evolving in man, and with the help of the law of harmonious oscillations, machines and mechanical constructions and other things can be set in motion.  A small indication is to be found in what I connected with the person Strader in my Mystery Dramas" (p93).  He then goes on to reiterate C. G. Harrison's remarks (almost word for word) about the misuse of such knowledge.

                              This brings us to the main point of concern; the relationship between humanity and technology.  Technology is amoral.  A knife can be used equally by a surgeon and a murderer; fire can kill germs as well as human beings.  The great 'progress' in the West is based on technological prowess alone, not on moral superiority.  What is more, technological development has diverted attention away from the need for moral development.  Anyone who doubts this only has to look at the complete breakdown of order that occurred in New Orleans this past week.

                              There are reports (see Marc Seifer's biography) that, when Tesla died, the FBI siezed all the scientific papers in Tesla's possession.  Whether Tesla had really discovered 'Vril' power or had simply developed a number of weapons based on his developed knowledge of electricity is open to question.  His understanding of electricity and its potential was indeed considerable.  There is much discussion about 'HAARP', its purpose, and its connection with Tesla.

                        • DoctorStarman@aol.com
                          In a message dated 8/31/2005 11:44:03 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Why is everybody always ready to cry The sky is falling? Lack of faith in ourselves? In ...
                          Message 12 of 14 , Sep 17, 2005
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                            In a message dated 8/31/2005 11:44:03 AM Eastern Daylight Time, john@... writes:

                            It used to be that only environmentalists and paranoids warned about the world running out of oil and the future it could bring: crashing economies, resource wars, social breakdown, agony at the pump. Not anymore -- and certainly not this summer, with the average national price of a gallon of gasoline somewhere around $2.60 in late August, up 73 cents from last year, and with Hurricane Katrina's aftereffects bound to push prices still higher...




                            *******Here in Virginia Beach, gas prices are already back down to under $2.60 a gallon. So much for a hurricane causing a long-term gas price rise.


                               I just came back from Norway where they have their own North Sea oil, yet they pay the equivalent of $6.00 a gallon and their economy is humming.


                               Why is everybody always ready to cry The sky is falling? Lack of faith in ourselves? In
                            our fellow men? In God?

                            -Starman

                            www.DrStarman.com
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