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  • Mathew Morrell
    Classical Greek culture can be viewed as a cult of the body, as evidenced by the countless number of statues and plastic arts discovered in the region, almost
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 4, 2004
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      Classical Greek culture can be viewed as a cult of the body, as
      evidenced by the countless number of statues and plastic arts
      discovered in the region, almost all of which show the likeness of
      the human form. That the human form was something of grand
      significanse in Classical Greece is obvious in every expression-form
      that they possessed metaphysically, ethically, artistically and
      politically, even mathmatically. The stiff, evenly balanced poses
      of the early Archaic statuary had completely vanished to be replaced
      by statues of increasing artistic expressivness. Rational and point-
      formed, "the body as become" stood at the center of endless space
      wheather lounging, standing, sitting, lying down, always emmiting an
      air of beauty and elegance but all too often no interior radiance.
      The "body as become" was idealized and even worshipped to the point
      of minimalizing Mind and Spirit, and hence the disporportionately
      small head formations distinctive to the dying Late Culture. The
      Euclidean world-principle is visibly evident in the anatomical
      accuracy of their plastic arts, whereas the Classical is evident in
      their nakeness; for any clothing would have been a barrier for the
      Ideal.

      After Classical man came the Hellenistic era. More and more statues
      started to break out into the surrounding space as expressiveness
      begun to dominate. In the Hellenistic era, strong revolutionary
      currents takeover so that relief sculptures can barely be contained
      within their friezes. Arms are no longer attached to walls. They
      reach out, clutch, embrace, or slay like "Athena Attacking the
      Giants" on the altar at Pergamon or "Laocoon and His Sons" by
      Hegasandros. The Hellenistic artist pushed space to its ultimate
      limit until it could be pushed no further.
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