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Re: [steiner] Michaelmas verses

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  • JP@Mison.com
    ... From: DoctorStarman@aol.com To: steiner@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 12:25 AM Subject: Re: [steiner] Michaelmas verses Himmel und
    Message 1 of 19 , Sep 18, 2003
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      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 12:25 AM
      Subject: Re: [steiner] Michaelmas verses

      "Himmel und Erde mussen vergehn
      Aber die musici, aber die musici, aber die musici, bleiben bestehn."
      -Starman

       
      Some translations:  
       
      All things must perish from under the sky,
      Music alone shall live .  .  . never to die.
       
      Tout doit sur terre mourir un jour,
      Mais la musique .  .  . vive toujours. 
       
      Does anyone know the source of the words, translations, or music for this wonderful round? 
      Is this Mozart?
    • Jp
      ... From: DRStarman2001@aol.com [mailto:DRStarman2001@aol.com] Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 12:00 AM To: steiner@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re: [steiner]
      Message 2 of 19 , Sep 18, 2003
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        -----Original Message-----
        From: DRStarman2001@... [mailto:DRStarman2001@...]
        Sent:
        Thursday, September 18, 2003 12:00 AM
        To: steiner@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [steiner] Michaelmas verses

         


        JP@... writes:



        ******It was originally a French round used in the Waldorf schools and my copy says it was translated into English by them, whoever they may be. I got it from the Waldorf Institute years ago. It's in the key of C and the first note is B.
        -Starman
        http://www.DrStarman.net

         

        I would love to see a French version, if anyone has one. 

        The German words are so fine – and so wedded to the music -- I think that those may be the original. 

        I imagine it’s by a modern, even anthroposophical, composer. 

         

        It may look like it’s in C, but if you listen to it, it doesn’t have a major key sound at all. 

        It’s actually in one of the old Greek/medieval modes – Dorian, I think.   

         

                                               -- Joe P.

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Jp [mailto:jp@...]
        Sent
        :
        Wednesday, September 17, 2003 10:41 PM
        To: 'steiner@yahoogroups.com'
        Subject: RE: [steiner] Michaelmas verses

         

        Thanks for these poems & the song.

         

        Can Dr. Starman or anyone help me with the source of the round he sent? 

         

        I learned it with German words, and I’ve always wondered who wrote the haunting, beautifully woven words and music: 

         

        Denkend das dunkle durchdringen,

        Wirkend in wärme weben,

        Liebend das Licht erleben. 

         

        I’ve tried a translation of this like: 

         

        Thinking through darkness delving,

        Working in warmth we’re weaving,

        Loving the light we live. 

         

        The last word in the German, ‘erleben,’ really means ‘experience;’  but as it has the word ‘live’ within it, it seems to speak of a living experience, or an experience that is lived. 

        A more literal translation would be: 

         

        Thinking, penetrate the darkness. 

        Working, weave in warmth,

        Loving, experience the light.   

         

        Can anyone help me read the text in the manuscript? 

        I think I see the words to the song, but I could use help with the notes above and below: 

        Do these say “French (?) round for three voices”

        and

        “The text of the round was translated by Inge with the help of Peter”?

        Does anyone know the French?  or how to ask Inge and Peter about this? 

         

                          -- Joseph Proskauer

      • michael horowitz
        JP@Mison.com wrote:----- Original Message ----- From: DoctorStarman@aol.com To: steiner@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 12:25 AM Subject:
        Message 3 of 19 , Sep 18, 2003
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          JP@... wrote:
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 12:25 AM
          Subject: Re: [steiner] Michaelmas verses

          "Himmel und Erde mussen vergehn
          Aber die musici, aber die musici, aber die musici, bleiben bestehn."
          -Starman

           
          Some translations:  
           
          All things must perish from under the sky,
          Music alone shall live .  .  . never to die.
           
          Tout doit sur terre mourir un jour,
          Mais la musique .  .  . vive toujours. 
           
          Does anyone know the source of the words, translations, or music for this wonderful round? 
          Is this Mozart?  
          This sounds like an elliptical paraphrase of Dryden's Ode on St. Cecelia's Day
           
          Mike Horowitz


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        • Jp
          ... From: DoctorStarman@aol.com Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 12:25 AM Subject: Re: [steiner] Michaelmas verses Himmel und Erde mussen vergehn Aber die
          Message 4 of 19 , Sep 18, 2003
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            ----- Original Message -----

            Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 12:25 AM

            Subject: Re: [steiner] Michaelmas verses

             

            "Himmel und Erde mussen vergehn
            Aber die musici, aber die musici, aber die musici, bleiben bestehn."
            -Starman

             

            From: JP@...

             

            Some translations:  

             

            All things must perish from under the sky,

            Music alone shall live .  .  . never to die.

             

            Tout doit sur terre mourir un jour,

            Mais la musique .  .  . vive toujours. 

             

            Does anyone know the source of the words, translations, or music for this wonderful round? 

            Is this Mozart?  

             

             

            From: michael horowitz [mailto:mdhdo@...]

            Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 2:07 PM

            This sounds like an elliptical paraphrase of Dryden's Ode on St. Cecelia's Day

             

            Mike Horowitz

             

            Thank you, Mike. 

             

            I found “A Song for St. Cecilia's Day, 1687” on the web. 

            (Some excerpts copied below.) 

             

            Does anyone have any other information on our two Michaelmas rounds (or any of the unattributed poems)? 

             

                               - Joe P.

             

             

            From  A Song for St. Cecilia's Day, 1687”

             

             

            FROM harmony, from heavenly harmony,

                  This universal frame began:

              When nature underneath a heap

                  Of jarring atoms lay,

                And could not heave her head,

            The tuneful voice was heard from high,

                'Arise, ye more than dead!'

            Then cold, and hot, and moist, and dry,

              In order to their stations leap,

                 And Music's power obey.

            From harmony, from heavenly harmony,

               This universal frame began:

               From harmony to harmony

            Through all the compass of the notes it ran,

            The diapason closing full in Man. 

             

             

            What passion cannot Music raise and quell?

                When Jubal struck the chorded shell,

              His listening brethren stood around,

                And, wondering, on their faces fell

              To worship that celestial sound:

            Less than a God they thought there could not dwell

                Within the hollow of that shell,

                That spoke so sweetly, and so well.

            What passion cannot Music raise and quell?

             

             

            After this verse praising the invention of musical instruments (see Genesis 4:21), there are verses praising trumpet & drum, flute & lute, violins, lyre, and Cecilia’s bringing of the organ: 

             

              Orpheus could lead the savage race;

             

              And trees unrooted left their place,

             

                Sequacious of the lyre;

              

            But bright Cecilia rais'd the wonder higher:

             

            When to her organ vocal breath was given,

             

              An angel heard, and straight appear'd

             

                Mistaking Earth for Heaven. 

             

             

             

            Finally, the “Grand Chorus” which Mike must’ve had in mind:    

             

            As from the power of sacred lays

              The spheres began to move,

            And sung the great Creator's praise

              To all the Blest above;

            So when the last and dreadful hour

            This crumbling pageant shall devour,

            The trumpet shall be heard on high,

            The dead shall live, the living die,

            And Music shall untune the sky!

             

          • DRStarman2001@aol.com
            ... Music alone shall live Music alone shall live. . . never to die. ... [Unable to display image]
            Message 5 of 19 , Sep 21, 2003
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              "Himmel und Erde mussen vergehn
              Aber die musici, aber die musici, aber die musici, bleiben bestehn."
              -Starman


              *******My copy (below) just says it's an old German canon or round, "Die musici"

               
              All things shall perish from under the sky,
              Music alone shall live 

              Music alone shall live 
              Music alone shall live.  .  . never to die.


              Does anyone know the source of the words, translations, or music for this wonderful round? 
              Is this Mozart?  

            • Jp
              At a Michaelmas celebration last night, we recited the first verse posted to this group (copy below). From: eurythmy [mailto:eurythmy@tinyworld.co.uk] Sent:
              Message 6 of 19 , Oct 2, 2003
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                At a Michaelmas celebration last night, we recited the first verse posted to this group (copy below).  

                 

                From: eurythmy [mailto:eurythmy@...]
                Sent
                :
                Wednesday, September 17, 2003 4:24 PM
                Subject: [steiner] Michaelmas verses

                 

                Thou Michael the victorious,

                I make my circuit under thy shield.

                Thou Michael, of the white steed

                And of the bright, brilliant blade !

                Conqueror of the dragon,

                Be thou at my back.

                Thou ranger of the heavens !

                Thou warrior of the King of all

                Thou Michael the victorious

                My pride and my guide !

                Thou Michael the victorious

                The glory of mine Eye.   

                 

                 

                I found myself considering the open Square of Pegasus as a shield – and the Northern Cross as a bright blade, with Mars’ circuit under them. 

                 

                The more I watch the sky these days, the more I wonder:  how does this planet relate to “Michael the victorious / My pride and my guide! .  .  . The glory of mine Eye. ?    

                 

                I’m most interested in others’ experience of the stars this season. 

                 

                *                     *             *        *        *             *                     *

                 

                Updated description of the night sky for October:   

                 

                (The story thus far: 

                Mars' closest approach to earth in 60,000 years was Wednesday morning August 27th, at 5:51am EST.  Six hours later, it was exactly opposite the sun -- sun, earth, and Mars forming a straight line.  The next day, Mars reached perihelion -- its closest approach to the sun.  While all this occurred, Mars was the only planet in the evening sky:  Moon, Mercury, Venus, and Jupiter were all close to the Sun in the constellation of the Lion, and Saturn wasn’t far away.  Mars was in the middle of its great loop:  throughout August, as seen from Earth, it had been moving backward from night to night amidst the stars as it drew closer.  Then, through September, Mars gradually moved away from Earth, while its retrograde motion slowed;  on September 29th, Michaelmas, it stood still.  Now it’s heading onward again through the Water-Bearer.  September 29th also marked the beginning of summer in Mars’ southern hemisphere, and winter in the north;  Mars’ south polar cap, visible in a telescope, has already begun to shrink.) 

                 

                There’s still time for observing Mars ‘up close,’ but watch it grow less bright as it curves away from earth. 

                 

                Like the stars around it, Mars has been rising a little earlier each evening.  By the time the sun sets (now around 6:30 – also becoming a little earlier each night), it should already be visible above the southeastern horizon (though it may take time for it to get above buildings, trees, or haze).  You won’t miss it (though you might mistake it for a plane, or visa versa);  it’s the brightest thing in the sky.  Until 8pm or so, it’s in the southeast;  9-midnight in the south;  early morning in the southwest.  It’s setting about 3:30 am – ¾ of an hour earlier by the end of October.    

                 

                During early evening, with Mars in the southeast, Antares, the orange "Rival of Mars," is low in the southwest (and much fainter);  Mars is now about twice as high as its rival at the end of twilight.  (Tonight, the crescent Moon is just to Antares’ east.  As the moon waxes this week, its brightness may make Mars’ rival difficult to see.)  How do their colors compare?  (When Mars is distant and no brighter than Antares, their colors appear more alike.)  

                 

                Trailing Mars across the sky is the bright star Fomalhaut.  As Dr. Starman pointed out, “It's hard .  .  . not to notice the bright star just about directly underneath (or to the south of) Mars. It's the 'Southern Fish'--- not one of the fishes of Pisces, but another Fish in the 'southern ocean', the stream of water pouring from the Water-Bearer's jar.  .  .  . [It] is Fomalhaut, the Eye of the Fish (or the coin in the fish's mouth, from the New Testament).  [I believe ‘Fomalhaut’ means ‘Mouth of the Fish’ in Arabic.]  It's one of the 4 'Royal Stars' along with Regulus the Heart of the Lion in Leo opposite, Antares the Heart of the Scorpion and Aldebaran, the Eye of the Bull of Taurus [now rising about 10pm].”  These three are in ‘fixed’ constellations of the Zodiac;  Fomalhaut is below Aquarius, the fourth fixed constellation in this Zodiacal cross.  These four stars are each prominent in a different season of the year, and they once marked the position of the Sun at the solstices and equinoxes.  From ancient times, they have been associated with powerful forces – including archangels.  (Which would you associate with Michael?) * 

                 

                In the early night hours, high overhead (northwest of Mars), is the Northern Cross (Cygnus, the swan).   The Great Square of Pegasus is rising in the east.  From about 8:30 pm til 10:30, these two forms straddle the zenith to east and west.  On a hazy LI night, there are few stars visible anywhere near Mars but these (and Fomalhaut).  They make a striking pair – the peripheral and centrifugal aspects of four-squareness – and they present a striking contrast with the bright shining planet below them. 

                 

                It’s interesting that the other visible planets gathered opposite Mars in the Zodiac as it made its grand approach.  It’s as if they cleared the night sky for the grand dance of Mars (like a basketball team clearing the lane for the ‘star’ to do his stuff).  Now, the pre-dawn sky features three more planets:   Saturn rises before midnight in the Twins, and is high overhead by 6am.  Jupiter rises around 4:20am, followed a little over an hour later by Mercury (who will soon fade back into the light of sunrise).  (Again, these rise a little earlier each night, along with the stars around them.  Saturn offers great telescope viewing – its rings are near maximum tilt.)   

                 

                During the week following Michaelmas, the Moon will be moving away from Antares in Scorpio, through Sagittarius and Scorpio, toward Mars.  When will they pass each other?  For a fuller astronomical experience, try to notice how the Moon and Mars move against the stars around them from night to night, and from week to week.  (Several movements are happening at once.) 

                 

                                                                                              -- Joseph Proskauer

                 

                 



              • DRStarman2001@aol.com
                ... ******In fact, the Moon will pass directly in front of Mars ---- occult (hide) it----on the morning of Mon. Oct. 6th. Unfortunately that will not be
                Message 7 of 19 , Oct 2, 2003
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                  JP@... writes:
                  >>During the week following Michaelmas, the Moon will be moving away from Antares in Scorpio, through Sagittarius and Scorpio, toward Mars.  When will they pass each other?  For a fuller astronomical experience, try to notice how the Moon and Mars move against the stars around them from night to night, and from week to week. 

                  ******In fact, the Moon will pass directly in front of Mars ----"occult" (hide) it----on the morning of Mon. Oct. 6th.
                      Unfortunately that will not be visible from North America, but you'll see the Moon quite close to Mars Sunday night from here, and the next night it will have passed from being to the right of Mars to being on its left.
                  -starman
                  http://www.DrStarman.net
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