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  • Mathew Morrell
    Oct 7, 2005
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      1.  Not many astronomers in Steiner's day believed that the Moon was once adjoined with the Earth; in the early 1900s, astronomers generally felt that the Moon was captured by Earth's gravitational field.  Where as, in the modern age, the majority of astronomers would now agree with Steiner's outrageous vision.  For the Earth to have captured a moon from the Early Universe would have been very possible indeed, but not very probable.  Extraordinary circumstances must prevail in order to capture any astronomical object, let alone set that object within a bound orbit.  Scientific analysis of the moon's overall composition further substantiate the Moon-Earth hypothesis; tests prove that the Moon's composition is very similar (in astronomical terms) to the Earth's outer layers; the Moon has no magnetic core, but the Earth does.  The Moon pulled away from the Earth while the two were still very young, hot, accreting spheres of loosely bound material.  Tremendous spiritual Powers were involved in this separation; for it did not occur mechanically.  The creation of an inhabitable Earth was the work of divine intelligences willing Earth into existence, using infinitely subtle forces to gently extract necessary elements from the Earth's outer core:  capitalizing on the gigantic magnetic field emitted by the slowly rotating Mass. 

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      2.  A poem, untitled.

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      The Old Earth is silently sleeping,

                  the void alight with her glow.

      Her globe a circle of gems blinking

      yellows, greens and golds.  

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      3.  People should consider reading Colin Wilson's "Spider World," if they have any free time this weekend and want to curl up with a good book; this science fiction series is especially appropriate after our discussions in the past week concerning "spiders." "Spider World" takes place in the far future, after a world catastrophe almost totally eradicates the human population.  The few humans that are left on the earth are kept as slaves, not by fellow human, but by a population of giant spiders which rule the earth through their awesome mind powers.  The spiders seem unconquerable until the hero of the story, Niall, discovers a way of thinking that is unaffected by spider's icy intelligence.  What he learns is essentially "thought-free" thinking---thinking devoid of abstraction.

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      Mathew Morrell

      www.kcpost.net 

       
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