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William C. Daldy and Toroa

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  • dhic001@ec.auckland.ac.nz
    Dear All, Made a visit in the company of a friend,(actually one of the crane operators of the floating steam crane Hikitia) to the William C. Daldy today. The
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 2, 2001
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      Dear All,
      Made a visit in the company of a friend,(actually one of the crane
      operators of the floating steam crane Hikitia) to the William C. Daldy
      today. The William C. Daldy is the 1936 ex Auckland Harbour Board
      steam tug. She is currently laid up for the winter period at Devonport
      Wharf on the northern side of Auckland Harbour. Major work has been
      being done on her starboard decks. The steel deck had corroded away
      under the teak decking, and this has had to be totally replaced. The
      work has gone on well, and the new steel is in place, and most of the
      new planking. The forward boiler is being prepared for survey, and
      some tubes may need to be replaced soon. Next year will see more hull
      plate repairs, this time in the vicinity of the engine room, the
      general service pumps need ing to remoevd for this. The funnel has
      been rebuilt, and is currently surrounded by a large casing, so the
      ship is not attractive to look at, the appearance os a square funnel
      in place of her lovely riveted one is not a pretty sight. The society
      have a need website, which while still under construction, is very
      good. The site address is http://www.daldy.com please pay a visit.

      Also visited the old double ended steam ferry Toroa, which is laid up
      at Stanley Bay Wharf, Devonport. She is looking very sorry for her
      self, but the good news is that she will soon be coming out of the
      water for restoration. Toroa suffers from an unusual problem for New
      Zealand built vessels in that ahe has rusted frames. Most New Zealand
      built vessels were fully wooden vessels, but Toroa is of comnposite
      construction with steel frames and wooden planks, not a good
      combination at the best of times, least of all in a 76 year old vessle
      that has been out of servie for 21 years, and has been under water at
      least once. Her restoration is going to be long, difficult and
      expensive, but provided the necessary enthusiasm and money is there,
      she may one day grace Auckland Harbour again. She is the last wooden
      double ended steam ferry in the world, and retains her original triple
      expansion engine and scotch boiler.

      Any news from anywhere else around the world?
      Thanks, Daniel Hicks
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