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Slightly Odd Q

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  • Staci Hapdock
    Something really small that s been niggling at me. In SCE: Breakdowns, right near the start of Pattie s story, she gets to her teacher s place where tea has
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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      Something really small that's been niggling at me. In SCE: Breakdowns, right near the start of Pattie's story, she gets to her teacher's place where tea has been made. I don't know much about tea preparation, so I'm not sure if it's a typo, or a way of preparing it I don't know, but it mentions them 'seeping' the tea. As I said, not a big deal, just something that caught my attention.




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    • Keith R.A. DeCandido
      ... Yup, that s a term for it. Keith R.A. DeCandido keith@decandido.net DeCandido.net | AlbeShiloh.com www.livejournal.com/~kradical Don t you know there
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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        >Something really small that's been niggling at me. In SCE: Breakdowns,
        >right near the start of Pattie's story, she gets to her teacher's place
        >where tea has been made. I don't know much about tea preparation, so I'm
        >not sure if it's a typo, or a way of preparing it I don't know, but it
        >mentions them 'seeping' the tea. As I said, not a big deal, just
        >something that caught my attention.

        Yup, that's a term for it.




        Keith R.A. DeCandido
        keith@...
        DeCandido.net | AlbeShiloh.com
        www.livejournal.com/~kradical

        "Don't you know there ain't no devil, there's just God when he's drunk."
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      • Staci Hapdock
        What s the difference between seeping and steeping it? ... Yup, that s a term for it. Keith R.A. DeCandido keith@decandido.net DeCandido.net | AlbeShiloh.com
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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          What's the difference between seeping and steeping it?


          "Keith R.A. DeCandido" <krad@...> wrote:

          >Something really small that's been niggling at me. In SCE: Breakdowns,
          >right near the start of Pattie's story, she gets to her teacher's place
          >where tea has been made. I don't know much about tea preparation, so I'm
          >not sure if it's a typo, or a way of preparing it I don't know, but it
          >mentions them 'seeping' the tea. As I said, not a big deal, just
          >something that caught my attention.

          Yup, that's a term for it.




          Keith R.A. DeCandido
          keith@...
          DeCandido.net | AlbeShiloh.com
          www.livejournal.com/~kradical

          "Don't you know there ain't no devil, there's just God when he's drunk."
          ---Tom Waits, "Heartattack and Vine"








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        • April Payne
          That probably should have read steeping the tea. Usually after you pour in the boiling water you let the tea sit for about two to five minutes before
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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            That probably should have read 'steeping' the tea. Usually after you pour in the boiling water you let the tea sit for about two to five minutes before pouring the first cup. This enables the tea to infuse the water, called steeping. If you pour it too soon the tea is too weak, not fully brewed as it were.

            Hope this helps.

            april,
            whose British heritage demands she drink a lot of tea! :P

            Staci Hapdock <spaci1701@...> wrote:

            Something really small that's been niggling at me. In SCE: Breakdowns, right near the start of Pattie's story, she gets to her teacher's place where tea has been made. I don't know much about tea preparation, so I'm not sure if it's a typo, or a way of preparing it I don't know, but it mentions them 'seeping' the tea. As I said, not a big deal, just something that caught my attention.




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          • Frances
            I though seeping was when you let the teabag sit in the cup of water and steeping was when you held the teabag string and bobbed it up and down in the water. I
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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              I though seeping was when you let the teabag sit in the cup of water and steeping was when you held the teabag string and bobbed it up and down in the water. I could be wrong.--- On Fri 07/01, April Payne < april_anastasia@... > wrote:
              From: April Payne [mailto: april_anastasia@...]To: startrekbooks@yahoogroups.comDate: Fri, 1 Jul 2005 09:38:39 -0700 (PDT)Subject: Re: [Star Trek Books] Slightly Odd QThat probably should have read 'steeping' the tea. Usually after you pour in the boiling water you let the tea sit for about two to five minutes before pouring the first cup. This enables the tea to infuse the water, called steeping. If you pour it too soon the tea is too weak, not fully brewed as it were.Hope this helps.april,Staci Hapdock wrote:them 'seeping' the tea.


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            • don hallenbeck
              When I do tea in a cup, I leave the bag right in till I m almost done then take it out. Tea, Earl Grey, 70*C, please. Don H. Frances
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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                When I do tea in a cup, I leave the bag right in till I'm almost done then take it out.
                Tea, Earl Grey, 70*C, please.
                Don H.

                Frances <fmcoleman@...> wrote:
                I though seeping was when you let the teabag sit in the cup of water and steeping was when you held the teabag string and bobbed it up and down in the water. I could be wrong.--- On Fri 07/01, April Payne < april_anastasia@... > wrote:
                From: April Payne [mailto: april_anastasia@...]To: startrekbooks@yahoogroups.comDate: Fri, 1 Jul 2005 09:38:39 -0700 (PDT)Subject: Re: [Star Trek Books] Slightly Odd QThat probably should have read 'steeping' the tea. Usually after you pour in the boiling water you let the tea sit for about two to five minutes before pouring the first cup. This enables the tea to infuse the water, called steeping. If you pour it too soon the tea is too weak, not fully brewed as it were.Hope this helps.april,Staci Hapdock wrote:them 'seeping' the tea.


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              • April Payne
                wrote:I though seeping was when you let the teabag sit in the cup of water and steeping was when you held the teabag string
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 1, 2005
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                  <<<<Frances <fmcoleman@...> wrote:I though seeping was when you let the teabag sit in the cup of water and steeping was when you held the teabag string and bobbed it up and down in the water. I could be wrong.>>>>


                  Just looked up both terms in the dictionary:

                  seep -- to leak, drip or flow out slowly through small openings or pores: ooze. noun 1. a place where water, oil, etc. oozes from the ground to form a pool 2 seepage

                  steep2 --- vt. 1 to soak in liquid, so as to soften, clean, extract the essence of, etc. 2 to immerse, saturate, absorb, or imbue *[steeped in folklore]* ---vi steeped, as tea leaves
                  noun 1 a steeping or being steeped 2 liquid in which something is steeped. --- syn. soak

                  Hope that helps to further clarify it. I have to admit that in all my fifty years I've never heard the process of extracting flavor from a teabag or bulk tea as "seeping". I think that term was used in error. Or at least, it seems rather obscure, at best. Others may know better than me.




                  april


                  "I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days attack me at once!"



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